Scored

Scored

by Lauren McLaughlin

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

Set in the future when teenagers are monitored via camera and their recorded actions and confessions plugged into a computer program that determines their ability to succeed. All kids given a "score" that determines their future potential. This score can get kids into colleges, grant scholarships, or destroy all hope for the above. Scored's reluctant heroine is Imani, a girl whose high score is brought down when her best friend's score plummets. Where do you draw the line between doing what feels morally right and what can mean your future? Friendship, romance, loyalty, family, human connection and human value: all are questioned in this fresh and compelling dystopian novel set in the scarily forseeable future.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780375867910
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Publication date: 10/23/2012
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 240
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

LAUREN McLAUGHLIN grew up in the small town of Wenham, Massachusetts. After college and a brief stint in graduate school, she spent 10 unglamorous years writing and producing movies before abandoning her screen ambitions to write fiction full-time. Though she fondly remembers much of her time in Massachusetts—the marina, the beach, various teenage escapades—she cannot, for the life of her, remember her SAT scores, her GPA, or any of the numbers that once summed her up.

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Scored 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So normally I don't read books like this but when my friend gave it to me, I figured why not? I fell in love with this book!:) Dystopian books tend not to be most teenagers favorites but I think anyone could enjoy this book! I hope they write another one it was so good! I highly recommend it, and it is great to get you in the mood to read books like 1984, a great classic!:)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved it
FeatheredQuillBookReviews More than 1 year ago
Somerton is a poor town; jobs have been lost since the second Great Depression when the Ponzi schemes and stock market crash left people homeless and helpless. In Somerton, however, they have found a new way of living life - they are what other people call a 'trial city.' Almost everywhere you turn in Somerton, there are small black balls (eyes) hanging from every street corner, café and in every classroom. These eyes were placed there by the Score Corporation, and they are there to watch, judge and keep score of all the students in the town. The score is received is based on many things - intelligence, social abilities, and how the subject can adapt to 'fit in' and do well in their future endeavors. The eyes don't actually 'hear' words, they are set up to read lips, study facial expressions, body movements, emotions, etc. to make sure that you're the "right" kind of person. For someone who has a high enough score, they will receive a free scholarship so that they can go on to college - the only way to do it because the parents are far too poor to further their child's education. If you are an "underscored" student, you will basically have the option of working in a mini-mart.or worse. All 'high scorers' sit together at lunch, hang out together, and stay in their "socially correct" group. If they are seen talking with someone who is underscored THEY lose points and the chance at getting the scholarships. In Somerton live two girls who have been best friends since they were little, and they made a pact that they would never give up their friendship no matter what happened with their scores. Imani is in the '90's' and has maintained her high score for a long time, but her best friend, Cady, has a very low score - and as she grows older and makes bad decisions, the score gets even lower. One day, the day of the month when the Score Charts go up so that all the students can see what their current score is, everyone starts to act very odd around Imani. It seems that almost overnight her score fell from a 92 into the basement. Why? Because the 'eye in the sky' saw her talking to Cady, and her friend then went out and began to date someone with an even lower score. Simply because Imani was 'spotted' as her friend, all her hard work has been erased. She is now shunned by the 90's group - with no hope of ever receiving her scholarship. Until.A teacher with tenure decides to offer a bright light at the end of the 'underscored' tunnel. There IS a scholarship, but in order to apply, a paper must be written that may just get Imani in even more trouble. There are significant questions that this book brings to the surface regarding 'social groups' and the way people are 'placed' into certain sectors of the world based on their actions, skin color, language, etc. Is this simply a new dystopian world that is a mirror image of the Nazi-regime? Or, is it actually exactly the path our country is currently headed down? One of the most amazing lines in this book is when the writer talks about loyalty as being a trait that people USED to think highly of - but no more. The writing is stupendous, the characters are flawless, and Miss McLaughlin has certainly made George Orwell very, very proud. Quill Says: There's nothing left to say but.READ THIS!
frellingtralk on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a very thoughtful book. Like most good science fiction, it begins with a concept. What would happen to our society if the "American Dream" died and was replaced by a ubiquitous surveillance and pattern recognition software driven meritocracy? What if participatory virtues were replaced with compliance to a greater than human intelligence nanny? McLaughlin's fascinating book explores this near future scenario through the eyes of Imani LeMonde. Imani is an intelligent high school senior who dreams of saving her Massachusetts coastal home town from its seemingly inevitable ecological and economic collapse. The college degree that would make this possible would be out of reach for her family if not for her town's participation in a pilot program from the Score Corps. Imani's plans are derailed very early in the book, setting up the conflict that helps the author explore her premise. Scored is written for young adults, and the fairly standard coming of age story that is at the heart of the drama will appeal (mostly)to younger readers. Imani and other core characters are likable and well-developed, so while the story line is predicable, it is still pleasant, and I found myself rooting for Imani in her research and ethical struggles. Where this book really shines is in its role as thought experiment, and to a lesser extent as a love letter to critical reasoning. I sincerely hope that McLaughlin writes sequels to this story, possibly for a slightly older audience. The world is very interesting, and I for one really want to know what happens next. Highly recommended for inquisitive teens, teachers, librarians and anyone concerned about income inequality.
skstiles612 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As a teacher, I¿m always trying to get my students to work hard. We all know that the state test scores determine so much for a student. It looks like someone finally wondered what it would be like if we went to the extreme and came up with this awesome book. Imagine a world where you are continuously watched and judged. Imani is a teenager who has bought into the whole ScoreCorp garbage. Why? She has a high score. Everything affects your scores, who you are friends with, who you date, who you work with or help in school. There is no privacy. Step out of line and you could ruin your whole life. Of course, isn¿t it funny that ScoreCorp is the one in control? Only the rich can afford to go to college. If you want a chance then your parents must agree to have you scored. Imani¿s score drops. She is paired with Diego to complete a project. Diego doesn¿t have a score because his family is filthy rich. This pairing up opens Imani¿s eyes to many things that are going on around her.I have to say this would be a wonderful book to read together in class. The debates that could occur would be great. I could see picking an issue from the book and using Socratic circles to discuss those issues. I guess I see it this way because I am a teacher and we see so much pressure put on teachers and students about test scores. I think this is a book that parents, teachers and students will enjoy.I hope there is more from this author on this topic. If not I look forward to reading more of her work.
RtB on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Valeriebook provided by Deb Shapiro & CompanyCover notes/Warnings: Mature language/references Review: What if your life was scored, not just your intellect? What if it was scored all the time, wherever you went, dependent on who you hung out with? These are the dilemmas facing Imani. Since she was eight years old, she¿s been scored - and always highly. The eyes are everywhere, tracking her every move, facial expression, decision. The higher your score, the more advantages you have for college and a better job. Everyone knows their personal score as it¿s posted every month. But, her best friend¿s score is dropping, really dropping. Dropping to the point that Imani shouldn¿t see her, talk with her, or even acknowledge she exists...but, they made a pact. As her friend¿s life spirals out-of-control, Imani¿s score is drastically lowered and she is confronted with the challenge to write a paper opposing her personal views on scoring, as well as figuring out how to bring her score back up. Thinking that offering to spy on the ¿unscored¿ students at her school will help her personal score go up, she begins collaborating with a boy named Diego. The result of collaborating is not what she expects and as she tries to find out more and more about the corporation responsible for the scoring system, she feels more isolated than ever. Her parent¿s generation didn¿t have to deal with scoring, except for SAT¿s, GPA, and other intellectual test scores. They have no clue what it¿s like to have your LIFE scored. Her own brother starts to shun her, her best friend is practically out of her life, and she can¿t understand her new group of scored ¿friends.¿ A stunning dystopian novel that will cause a definite reaction as you realize how closely the book mirrors our current system in place. The implication that, in the future, a life can be scored for society¿s betterment is indeed chilling...or is it already here? Favorite Quote: ¿Imani¿s parents had read the brochure and signed the consent back when she was eight years old. They understood the reasons for the score. They understood the opportunities it afforded, but they didn¿t ¿ and couldn¿t ¿ understand what it was like.¿ page 37
julie10reads on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In the not-so-distant future, teenaged Imani must struggle within a world where a monotholithic corporation assigns young people a score that will determine the rest of their lives. Summary from book.After the ¿Second Depression¿, the chasm between the ¿haves¿ and the ¿have nots¿ widens. Education equals salvation yet opportunities are scarce. Score Corp, a software company, designs a program to assess a young person¿s ¿fitness¿ for higher education and therefore, for a better quality of life. Ubiquitous spherical cameras called eyeballs send video feed back to the corporation which is analyzed and ¿scored¿ for each person. A high score means a university scholarship. Score Corp has designated 5 key elements of fitness that will earn high scores:peer group, impulse control,congruity, diligence and rapport. There is no fraternizing between score levels:that breaks the ¿peer group¿ rule and will result in loss of points.Scored reflects the struggle and anxiety of today¿s youth who risk heavy debt to afford a university education that they hope will secure their future.Scored is not limited to any one group however. I found telling parallels with organized religion,the most devastating meritocracy. The eyeballs¿ scrutiny is surely comparable to an all-seeing God who keeps score for eternity!Ms McLaughlin endows her two teenaged protagonists with intelligence and fortitude. In this time of heroic teen series, it¿s unusual to have the main characters think their way out of jeopardy. 7.5 out of 10 for an engaging concept. Good book club choice!
pooled_ink More than 1 year ago
pooled ink Reviews: A quick read, a dark but intriguing concept, SCORED will cause you to shake your head, bare your teeth, and glare with defiance at the numbers that define your existence. Particularly relatable to juniors and seniors in high school (because college applications, ACT, SAT, etcetera), this story launches us into a future where every student is scored on everything at all times. Did you do your homework? Did you stop at that stop sign? Did you trip someone in the hallway? Are you friends with a trouble-maker? Did you eat your vegetables? They way you think, perform, behave, and react is all constantly monitored by cameras everywhere and each morning when you arrive at school you can check your score. You might be best friends with the other kids in the 80s for years but the day you rise or fall from your score bracket is the day you change lunch tables and change friends. But that’s just the way it is. That’s how you get a good job, how you become eligible for college. Everyone is a number, a score. That’s just the way it works. Sound familiar? *Every high school and college student raises their hand* Yeah, I thought so. Read my FULL review here: https://pooledink.com/2016/05/08/scored/
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cover notes/Warnings: Mature language/references Review: What if your life was scored, not just your intellect? What if it was scored all the time, wherever you went, dependent on who you hung out with? These are the dilemmas facing Imani. Since she was eight years old, she’s been scored – and always highly. The eyes are everywhere, tracking her every move, facial expression, decision. The higher your score, the more advantages you have for college and a better job. Everyone knows their personal score as it’s posted every month. But, her best friend’s score is dropping, really dropping. Dropping to the point that Imani shouldn’t see her, talk with her, or even acknowledge she exists…but, they made a pact. As her friend’s life spirals out-of-control, Imani’s score is drastically lowered and she is confronted with the challenge to write a paper opposing her personal views on scoring, as well as figuring out how to bring her score back up. Thinking that offering to spy on the “unscored” students at her school will help her personal score go up, she begins collaborating with a boy named Diego. The result of collaborating is not what she expects and as she tries to find out more and more about the corporation responsible for the scoring system, she feels more isolated than ever. Her parent’s generation didn’t have to deal with scoring, except for SAT’s, GPA, and other intellectual test scores. They have no clue what it’s like to have your LIFE scored. Her own brother starts to shun her, her best friend is practically out of her life, and she can’t understand her new group of scored “friends.” A stunning dystopian novel that will cause a definite reaction as you realize how closely the book mirrors our current system in place. The implication that, in the future, a life can be scored for society’s betterment is indeed chilling…or is it already here? Reviewed by Valerie. Book provided by Deb Shapiro & Company. Review Originally Posted @ Romancing the Book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
skstiles612 More than 1 year ago
As a teacher, I¿m always trying to get my students to work hard. We all know that the state test scores determine so much for a student. It looks like someone finally wondered what it would be like if we went to the extreme and came up with this awesome book. Imagine a world where you are continuously watched and judged. Imani is a teenager who has bought into the whole ScoreCorp garbage. Why? She has a high score. Everything affects your scores, who you are friends with, who you date, who you work with or help in school. There is no privacy. Step out of line and you could ruin your whole life. Of course, isn¿t it funny that ScoreCorp is the one in control? Only the rich can afford to go to college. If you want a chance then your parents must agree to have you scored. Imani¿s score drops. She is paired with Diego to complete a project. Diego doesn¿t have a score because his family is filthy rich. This pairing up opens Imani¿s eyes to many things that are going on around her. I have to say this would be a wonderful book to read together in class. The debates that could occur would be great. I could see picking an issue from the book and using Socratic circles to discuss those issues. I guess I see it this way because I am a teacher and we see so much pressure put on teachers and students about test scores. I think this is a book that parents, teachers and students will enjoy. I hope there is more from this author on this topic. If not I look forward to reading more of her work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago