Second Suns: Two Doctors and Their Amazing Quest to Restore Sight and Save Lives

Second Suns: Two Doctors and Their Amazing Quest to Restore Sight and Save Lives

by David Oliver Relin
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Second Suns: Two Doctors and Their Amazing Quest to Restore Sight and Save Lives 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A very interesting book. It's not the type I normally read, but I gave it a chance and am glad I did. The story moves quickly and is incredibly interesting. The contrast of operating in make-shift operating rooms versus the high tech operating rooms in the U.S. is enthralling.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Second Suns is a remarkable book about two doctors (one from the U.S. and one from Nepal) who restore sight to the impoverished. The beauty is in the detail of the stories. Highly recommended.
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
Sec­ond Suns: Two Doc­tors and Their Amaz­ing Quest to Restore Sight and Save Lives by David Oliver Relin is a non-fiction account of two oph­thal­mol­o­gists who are work­ing to alle­vi­ate blind­ness in third world coun­tries. Mr. Relin was the author of a sim­i­lar book, Three Cups of Tea, and trag­i­cally com­mit­ted sui­cide after the book’s valid­ity was dis­cred­ited (the rea­sons for the sui­cide are unclear). The book is an easy to read nar­ra­tive of two doc­tors from two com­pletely sep­a­rate lives who work together by per­form­ing cataract surgery in the Himalayas. Dr. San­duk Ruit is a Nepali doc­tor who pio­neered the small-incision cataract surgery using inex­pen­sive (not cheap) lenses. Geof­frey Tabin is an Amer­i­can liv­ing on the edge of what is con­sid­ered accept­able in soci­ety. Tabin, at first, left Har­vard to go moun­tain climb­ing but jointed force with Dr. Ruit. The author doesn’t present the two doc­tors as flaw­less heroes, but as flawed human beings who are doing an extra­or­di­nary ser­vice to make a dif­fer­ence in a remote part of the world. The doc­tors founded the Himalayan Cataract Project (HCP) which is still work­ing to this day to “erad­i­cate pre­ventable and cur­able blind­ness through high-quality oph­thalmic care, edu­ca­tion and the estab­lish­ment of a world-class eye care infrastructure”. While read­ing the amaz­ing story of the two doc­tors, the author also delves into the cul­ture, reli­gion, moun­tain climb­ing and land­scapes of the Himalayas. The book is well writ­ten, fast paced, inspir­ing and enjoy­able touch­ing on an impor­tant sub­ject which should be the topic of con­ver­sa­tion in many places, but sadly isn’t. Dis­claimer: I got this book for free.
readerx More than 1 year ago
I have met Geoff Tabin while on a climbing trip. He's an amazing person.