The Secret Scripture

The Secret Scripture

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Secret Scripture 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 50 reviews.
Frisbeesage More than 1 year ago
This is the haunting story of an elderly woman who has lived quietly in a mental hospital for many years. The resident doctor becomes interested in her case and digs up her history in an attempt to decide if she really is insane.
This book has been short listed for the Booker award and it¿s easy to see why. Lyrical prose combined with a captivating plot make for a book I couldn't put down. Above all I loved the pacing, the book starts out slowly, all about the beautiful writing, and then the plot takes over, building to a big climax.
I listened to the audio version of this. Wanda McCaddon's Irish accent really added to the atmosphere and context of the story. She does an especially impressive job with elderly Roseanne's voice versus young Roseanne's voice. I highly recommend listening to this one!
adunlea More than 1 year ago
Book Review of The Secret Scripture by Annette Dunlea This book is now available in paperback, published by Faber and Faber and its ISBN is: 0571215297. It was short listed for the man Booker Prize 2008 and won the Costa Book of The Year 2008. It is literary Irish fiction at its best. It records the past dominance of church in secular relations and the maltreatment of women in the hands of men. The story is heard in two voices the elderly Roseanne Mc Nulty a patient and Dr.Greene a psychiatrist. Roseanne is a very old woman who records her secret history in her secret journal and in vivid poetic prose. The doctor is forced to re-evaluate his patients in the asylum and see if they can be released into the community, therein lies the plot of the tale. Our purpose is to discover the reason for Roseanne's admission and in doing so we get a history of Irish life in Sligo in 1930. Dr. Greene too records his interviews with Roseanne. His voice is in a different more modern tone to hers. He is an independent impartial observer to her tale. Gentle not to upset her he teases information from her and so we are left to discover the truth for ourselves. The paradox of the imperfection of human memory as opposed to the factual written word is show here. She develops a wonderful relationship with the doctor based on empathy. He too is grieving the death of his wife and his own imperfection as being the ultimate healer. Roseanne was a beauty in her day living on the outskirts of society who has been maltreated by her community. By recording her tale she gives a voice to the woman who was institutionalized by priests and by society unjustly. In recording her annals she healed herself. She is not so much a victim as a survivor. While some were dismayed by the ending I enjoyed the novel for me it is a wonderful tale on compassionate, love, life and on human inter relations. It is story telling and dialogue at its best. What he records is important but equally so is his eloquent language. Reviewed by Annette Dunlea author of Always and Forever and The Honey Trap
Jack13152 More than 1 year ago
The most beautiful and poetic prose. A story that will not leave you soon
SheilaDeeth More than 1 year ago
The walls of an asylum might hide many secrets, but Dr. Grene’s interests are fixed on elderly Roseanne McNulty as the ancient asylum’s threatened with closure. Why was she left here? What was her crime or her insanity? And how will she cope in the outside world? Roseanne hides her secrets in a diary in Sebastian Barry’s The Secret Keeper. Meanwhile her doctor keeps secrets of his own, and both tell their lives from their own point of view, adding their own interpretations to events. When the stories start to collide and combine, their mysteries slip through the cracks and hints of deeper truths appear. Father Gaunt has written the truth he claims, but he might be as unreliable in his records as poor old Roseanne is in her written recollections. Feathers and cannon balls fall from a tower, symbols of the different paths of different points of view. And the fog of Sligo finally clears to reveal a tortured truth. The characters’ voices are beautifully and consistently portrayed in this novel. The points of view are vividly real. And the promise of hope stays alight throughout the tale. My only complaint would be that I guessed the conclusion too soon, but it couldn’t stop me reading—couldn’t tear me away from the characters. An enjoyable novel, evocative, haunting, and hopeful in spite of its dark themes, this one is highly recommended. Disclosure: My sister-in-law loaned me this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sebastian Barry's language is so full, it made me want to write some of it down and also to go back and read it again...as soon as I finished the book. I did not but only because I want to wait and savor it all one more time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a pick of my book club. It was good; not the best book I have ever read. The story itself was dark and depressing. The end contained a twist I absolutely did not see coming, which was fun. The writing itself was very good....descriptive and beautiful if somewhat rambling at times. Not a book I would have finished had it not been for the book club, but I am glad I did. It has sparked an interest in Irish history for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The writing is poetic, it is a book you absolutely cannot skim. Read every word. This is the first book I've read by this author and I will definitely read the rest of his work.
Andrew_of_Dunedin More than 1 year ago
n “Keeping the Faith”, Billy Joel advises us that “... the good ol' days weren't always good, and tomorrow ain't as bad as it seems ...” In “The Secret Scripture”, Sebastian Barry tells the story of Roseanne McNulty, an Irish girl born ahead of her time, waiting for society's impressions of a woman's place to catch up. Her reward was life in a mental institution – an institution preparing to shut down and the staff wondering what to do with their 98 year old long-term resident. Meanwhile, the psychiatrist in charge of the facility finds himself distracted by the death of his wife. “The Secret Scripture” was not my usual read. There were no crimes to solve, no car crashes, no demons … well, not unless they wore human form. Certainly nothing remotely resembling “mindless entertainment” - it was required to THINK while reading this book. I can do that on occasion and still enjoy a book. But, since I have to think for a living, I prefer my reading to be, um, less “deep”. Can't fault the author for that, however – my issue, not his!! RATING: 4 stars.
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Cant imagine how anyone couldnt like this book
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I always finish a book no matter how bad or slow - until this book. I couldn't even make it 1/2 way through it. It is horribly boring. There didn't seem any point to it.
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