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The Secret Sharer
     

The Secret Sharer

3.5 4
by Joseph Conrad
 

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pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. On my right hand there were lines of fishing stakes resembling a mysterious system of half-submerged bamboo fences, incomprehensible in its division of the domain of tropical fishes, and crazy of aspect as if abandoned forever by some nomad tribe of fishermen now gone to the

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pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. On my right hand there were lines of fishing stakes resembling a mysterious system of half-submerged bamboo fences, incomprehensible in its division of the domain of tropical fishes, and crazy of aspect as if abandoned forever by some nomad tribe of fishermen now gone to the other end of the ocean; for there was no sign of human habitation as far as the eye could reach. To the left a group of barren islets, suggesting

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9782819924012
Publisher:
pubOne.info
Publication date:
12/03/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
87 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) grew up amid political unrest in Russian-occupied Poland. After twenty years at sea with the French and British merchant navies, he settled in England in 1894. Over the next three decades he revolutionized the English novel with books such as Typhoon, Nostromo, The Secret Agent, and especially Heart of Darkness, his best-known and most influential work.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 3, 1857
Date of Death:
August 3, 1924
Place of Birth:
Berdiczew, Podolia, Russia
Place of Death:
Bishopsbourne, Kent, England
Education:
Tutored in Switzerland. Self-taught in classical literature. Attended maritime school in Marseilles, France

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The Secret Sharer (Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism Series) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
JWhitewater More than 1 year ago
Conrad is one of the best English storytellers ever, and this is no exception
Filomena Ayala More than 1 year ago
Blank book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One reading of 'The Secret Sharer' will absolutely not do justice to the story being told. For, far more important (and to some, myself, for one, interesting) than the literal story of a young captain who comes in contact with and harbors a fugitive sailor is the psychological aspect which may not be noticed on just the first reading. The Captain (who's only been on the ship for a short while) is faced with the conflict of his youthful passiveness and taking command as a leader. This inner struggle gives way to the birth (or rather, emergence) of his counterpart, Leggatt (in Freudian terms, the representative of the Id.) Throughout the story we see as the Captain struggles with hiding Leggatt from the eyes of anyone, to 'protect him' from being caught and facing punishment. Also noticeable is the decay of the Captains' mental state, to the point where even he questions his sanity. Left up to the reader to discern is the actuality of Leggatts' presence. However, the evidence piles high for the argument of his being an imagined being. The Captain (whose name, interestingly is never revealed) subconsciously 'creates' Leggatt as an outlet for his worries about his nature itself. Leggatt is the 'physical' manifestation of his Id, which he does not fully understand, but as we see is quite submissive to, almost in an admiring way. The division of his mind leads to his mental instability which gets progressively worse over time. I'm not going to spoil the ending, but the conclusion leaves him a different man from when we were first introduced. The book is rich with themes, of course there's the psychological, (with the Id, Ego, Superego & the Captains hallucinations) but there's also the themes of isolation, land vs. sea, stepping up to a role and thus maturing and the philosophical question of whether or not there is a right or wrong. I really enjoyed it. PS. Read it with Fight Club in mind and you might see a few similarities.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book was okay, i guess, but for a book that's aobut 60 pages long, it took forever!!!! it was good at times, but joseph conrad seemed to go on and on about the surrounds and i wanted to get back to the story. I really liked, however, how he wrote as if the captain and stow-away were twins. i also didn't like how he assumed that we knew everything about ships and all the slang that they used on ships. o well.