The Secret Sister

The Secret Sister

by Elizabeth Lowell
4.0 7

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Secret Sister 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This a re-issue of The Secret Sisters written by Anne Maxwell in 1993 - another of Elizabeth Lowell's identities. Like all of Lowell's books, it is a good read. I am disappointed that no mention was made of the re-issue status - I just bought and read a book that I had already bought and read - just did not realize it until I got into the book - who can remember a 12 year old title!
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kuhlcat More than 1 year ago
Have you ever read a book about which you are indifferent? This book falls under that category. I loved "Moving Target", and lent it to my best friend to read, who also enjoyed it. So when she picked up "The Secret Sister", she handed it to me to read, saying that she really enjoyed it. The storyline was very unique and intriguing. If there's anything I love about Elizabeth Lowell's books, it's that I learn something. In "Moving Target", it's all about medieval manuscripts, and in "The Secret Sister", the reader learns about the Anasazi and their culture. We're taken on a journey through Western America as Christy searches for her lost sister. Kokopelli, potsherds, kivas, cliff dwellings...The author describes them fluidly and vividly. But (you knew there was a "but" coming...) she describes them a bit too much. This seems to come up quite a bit in my posts; the over verbosity of authors. Readers aren't dumb. We get it. You don't need to go on and on about a tree, or in this case, a potsherd. Get to the point already. She could have saved a bit of paper if she was short and sweet. One love scene went on for at least 4 pages. Yes, Christy's in the throes of ecstasy. Move on. Ms Lowell also used the same phrases and ideas more than once. In the very first chapter, Christy decides to break up with her boring boyfriend Nick. So I established in my head that she was broken up. But then, a few chapters later, Christy decides again to break up with Nick, and the author uses almost exactly the same wording she had already used. There were also a few back-and-forths between Christy and Cain that were repeated, and I remember thinking to myself, didn't we already go through this? The search for Christy's sister Jo-Jo kept me excited for the story despite the issues I mention above. The good balances with the bad, which is why I'm indifferent. It's an ok book. Probably not one I'll read again (like "Moving Target", which I've read more than once), but it won't turn me away from Elizabeth Lowell, either. Maybe her next one will be more impressive.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Maybe it was the love of the characters, or the Anazazi Civilazation that kept me from setting the book down. I read on average 5 books a week, and this was certainly this weeks favorite. I have only read two other books by Lowell, however, this certainly will not be my last.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I began to get impatient with this book before I was halfway through. The focus was narrow without being interesting and neither of the two main characters jumped off the pages like her characters often do. I finished this book out of sheer determination because the plotline wasn't what kept me interested.