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Self-Conscious Emotions: The Psychology of Shame, Guilt, Embarrassment, and Pride
     

Self-Conscious Emotions: The Psychology of Shame, Guilt, Embarrassment, and Pride

by June Price Tangney (Editor), Kurt W. Fischer (Editor)
 

Given their strong theoretical relevance to both individual and interpersonal adjustment and functioning, it is ironic that the "self-conscious" emotions have been among the most neglected in the research literature. In recent years, however, the study of affect has come into its own as a vigorous, respectable, and productive branch of scientific psychology, and

Overview

Given their strong theoretical relevance to both individual and interpersonal adjustment and functioning, it is ironic that the "self-conscious" emotions have been among the most neglected in the research literature. In recent years, however, the study of affect has come into its own as a vigorous, respectable, and productive branch of scientific psychology, and with this shift has come a new interest in emotions such as shame, guilt, embarrassment, and pride. This volume provides a comprehensive, in-depth review of the current theoretical and empirical literature on these emotions. It brings together contributions from leading researchers and theoreticians from the fields of developmental psychology, clinical psychology, psychiatry, and sociology, reflecting the emerging coherence in this area of study.
The introduction provides a general framework for conceptualization and research on the self-conscious emotions. The book then addresses developmental issues, including the nature of these affective experiences among children, from late infancy to middle childhood, and implications for children's psychosocial functioning. Detailed explorations of the relationship of self-conscious emotions to aspects of social behavior and the social environment and to various types of psychopathology are also presented. Chapters demonstrate how an understanding of self-conscious emotions can greatly enhance the treatment of a wide range of maladaptive patterns of behavior, including marital conflict, depression, anxiety, and antisocial behavior. The final section discusses cross-cultural continuities and discontinuities in self-conscious affect. Throughout, the book highlights the need for innovative and diverse methodologies to systematically study the nature and functions of these feelings.
The unique focus on empirical approaches makes this work an invaluable resource for the growing number of researchers interested in the study of self-conscious affect and social behavior. Demonstrating the wide-ranging implications of this research for clinical practice, the book will interest practitioners in clinical psychology, psychiatry, and developmental psychology. In addition, Self-Conscious Emotions will benefit professionals in social psychology, sociology, and anthropology, and will serve as useful text for courses in the psychology of emotion, personality and emotion, and cultural psychology.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"I have not seen a better collection of papers on shame, embarrassment, guilt, and pride. Many different perspectives are represented in eighteen well-written chapters including developmental, cross-cultural, and narrative approaches. The book reports on cutting-edge research concerning a topic of interest in social, personality, developmental, and clinical psychology. Every student of human emotions will want a copy." —Peter Salovey, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of Graduate Studies in Psychology, Yale University.

"This book is an important contribution to the growing literature on the emotions, which should be read by emotion theorists and researchers, especially those with a special interest in what the editors call the self-conscious emotions. These include shame, embarrassment, guilt, and pride. The editors correctly point out that these emotions have been, to some extent, ignored in the study of the emotions. The authors of the chapters constitute a who's-who of social scientists who have contributed substantially to our understanding of one or more of these emotions. This volume is one of the best and most up-to-date sourcebooks containing current ideas and empirical research on them." —Richard S. Lazarus, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, University of California at Berkeley

"I found the book comprehensive in that it includes the development of self conscious emotions, clinical applications, and cultural differences. There was a nice mixture of older and newer investigators. It is an important sourcebook for researchers or anyone interested in shame, guilt, pride, and embarrassment." —Arnold Buss, Ph.D., University of Texas

"This timely book brings together many of the top names in the field of emotion to examine shame, guilt, embarrassment, and pride. This endeavor helps to redress a disturbing neglect of these important emotions and their social significance. The content-rich chapters range in focus from emotional development to cultural influence, yet each contributes to our understanding of the antecedents of these critical emotional experiences and their consequences for social conduct." —Bernard Weiner, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Booknews
Provides a comprehensive review of the current theoretical and empirical literature on self-conscious emotions, with an emphasis on methodological issues. Five sections include essays on the study and development of self-conscious emotion, social behavior and psychopathology in relation to self-conscious emotion; and cross- cultural perspectives. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780898622645
Publisher:
Guilford Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
01/27/1995
Pages:
542
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

June Price Tangney, PhD is Associate Professor of Psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Since receiving her doctorate in clinical psychology from UCLA in 1985, she has conducted research on the development and implications of shame and guilt. More recently, her work has focused on the links between shame and constructive versus destructive responses to anger. Her research has been fidned by grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and her papers have appeared in numerous professional journals.
Kurt W. Fischer, PhD, is Professor of Education in the Department of Human Development and Psychology at Harvard University, where he is leading an initiative to focus on diversity in development and its implications for education. Coeditor (with Geraldine Dawson) of Human Behavior and the Developing Brain, he previously served as a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, where he organized a group on Dynamic Modeling of Growth and Development.

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