The Senator's Wife

The Senator's Wife

by Sue Miller
3.2 84

Hardcover

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The Senator's Wife 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 84 reviews.
Debbie-J-1970 More than 1 year ago
I found this book a quick enjoyable read and think it would be great for a book club. It brings up lots of things to discuss, such as adultery, marriage, women's lib, politics and friendship. I felt it was a story about how much a woman (Delia) truly loved her husband and what she was willing to do to spend the rest of her life with him. At times I was very annoyed at Delia and felt she wasn't really living her life, just kind of waiting for Tom to come to her. As for Meri and Nathan, I do not think their relationship was explored enough. I found myself wondering if he'd had an affair, which was certainly eluded to at one point. And why was Nathan so interested in Tom? I do not think that question was really answered. **SPOILER** The ending of the book really made me dislike Meri. Why didn't she try to make amends with Delia? She just destroyed the lives of these two people and went off to live a wonderful life with her husband and three boys. Thank you Sue Miller for a book that really makes you think about life issues long after you finish reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After Ms. Miller wrote so softly about the 2 very different women, the ending came as a slap in the face. It seemed very,very crude, compared to the rest of the story. I was very mad at the author for handling it this way. I will not recommend this book to anyone. I hestitate to buy another of her books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read several other Sue Miller books and have really enjoyed them, but The Senator's Wife was absolutely awful. While Miller's writing style is to be appreciated, the plot started nowhere and went no place worth going. I'm not sure why I kept reading except for thinking that it would at some point get better....it didn't. Don't waste your time reading this.
KRD More than 1 year ago
We read this for book club and most of us thought it was so-so, but oddly enough, we had one of our best ever book discussions. Go figure.
masher1022 More than 1 year ago
I have read all Sue Miller's book but I felt like I was plodding along.I loved the characters and how she brought them to life but I kept anticipating more movement in the story and when it got to the end I found it very anticlimatic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An interesting delve into the complex emotion called love. Many more modern women would find the Senator's Wife a difficult character to relate to as she would likely signify everything that was wrong with our more traditional times. Modern women may seek to relate to the young, recently married, career-minded neighbor. After all, these women seem as different as night and day. They seem like they would have little in common. But as you get to know these women, you find that they are very similar in their core. They are both looking for love and acceptance in the form of relationships. The ups and downs that they go through in this search is something that all women should be able to relate to, whether or not they agree with the actions that they take. Love is never simple.
babyjj89 More than 1 year ago
I was really disappointed by this book. After what many readers and reviews said about the book, I was expecting something wonderful, but instead, I found the book to be quite a bore. I'll admit it was interesting, but the book had so many quiet spots, and I felt as if it were moving too slow. It seemed as if the book was never going to end. The way Sue Miller writes is in an interesting way, but it didn't have the ability to completely captivate my attention. Throughout the entire book, I felt like a bystander - like a ghost stands by and watches everything. Never did I feel involved with any of the characters' emotions.
GracieO More than 1 year ago
The reader can understand how neighbors become involved in each others lives and we are sometimes shocked at how each character behaves. I had empathy for each person.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It may just be this is not my style of book, but it was hard to get into at first. I struggled with understanding the story, or where it was headed for the first half. Once I got past literally the first half of the book, I enjoyed it more. She could have done more with character development in the beginning. I struggled connecting with the characters. Maybe if Sue went into the past lives of the senator and his wife first, there would have been a deeper connection.
Anonymous 3 months ago
I have no idea why I kept reading. Most boring mundane book that I've ever read.
Xkoqueen More than 1 year ago
Life is not for the weak of heart. The Senator’s Wife by Sue Miller was an interesting and gripping read. The story is told from the dual perspectives of Delia, a seventy-four year old woman, and her new next door neighbor, Meri, a young, recently married woman. The story is also told in multiple time periods. The time period changes are identified and easy to follow. The Senator’s Wife is a story about relationships, love, loss, longing, desires, and human nature. It’s about the uncertainty with which one’s adult life starts and the surety that comes from experience in one’s second-half—what is expected of you, what you can expect, and most importantly, what you can endure. Delia and her philandering husband, Tom, have stayed married but live apart. Meri and her husband, Nathan, live together but are sometimes uncomfortable with the adjustments in their new relationship. There are so many relationship nuances and parallels that come up in both couples’ lives. This is also about the friendship between Delia and Meri. It is a loose friendship based primarily on proximity. Meri looks to Delia for the attention and guidance that she never received from her mother. Meri is needy. She needs attention. She needs guidance. She needs the answers to life. She thinks needs to know intimate details about Delia to understand her. Delia has needs too. She needs her husband’s companionship. She needs him to be in love with her. She needs him to want her on her terms. At one point, Meri likens Delia’s situation with Jane Eyre—both Jane and Delia get their man only after tragedy has rendered them maimed. None of the characters in this book are perfect, and in their imperfection they are perfectly human. There are many unlikable aspects about each character, and some of their decisions and comments make one cringe. They are selfish, but they don’t think they are. They make choices thinking there is no victim from their behavior, however, there is no victim only if no one finds out. At one point, Delia tells Meri that as you get older you give yourself permission to forgive yourself. Meri is able to forgive her actions and move forward even knowing that she enabled Tom to finally destroy his relationship with Delia.  I find it interesting, in an odd way, that so many reviews are based on whether or not the reader likes the characters. For me, it is the quality of the writing and the richness of the storytelling that matter most. Sue Miller has provided quality writing and a unique and rich story in The Senator's Wife.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
JustMyTwoCents More than 1 year ago
This is not an "action-packed" story, but it still carries the reader along. However--SPOILER ALERT-- I was completely put off by the last two sentences in this novel. I did not understand it. To me Meri's and Tom did what they did out of a combined neediness and selfishness. This novel, to me, underlined the fine line between neediness and selfishness. Delia was needy, but not selfish. Tom and Meri were needy and selfish both, leading them to recklessness.  I was left feeling so badly for Delia, but angry at Meri for seeming over the years to -- while knowing what she did was wrong -- still identify with Tom and make him out to be a protagonist, thereby excusing what he and she did. The daughter Nancy was painted as bitter and vindictive and perhaps she was, but in the end I couldn't help but feel had she listened to her daughter, Delia could have saved herself a lot of heartache. Sad story. 
The_Book_Wheel_Blog More than 1 year ago
When I first heard about The Senator’s Wife by Sue Miller, I was so excited. As a news and politics junkie, I was delighted at the prospect of reading a political book written from the other side, especially one that focused on the family of a politician rather than the politician himself. It is my own fault for not doing enough research about this book before adding to my 2013 TBR Challenge list because, as it turns out, it isn’t about a senator at all. Sure,there is a man who was at one point in time a senator, but he’s just a placeholder for a husband who could have just as easily been an accountant or a professor. Needless to say, I was disappointed when I realized that this would not be a book about what it is like to be married to a senator. Luckily, I learned this early on and was able to readjust my expectations accordingly. Unfortunately, even after having done so, I was not thrilled about the book. I know it has amazing reviews, but I felt like all of the characters were hedging their bets and none were all-in on anything. The tiptoeing around and across the issues, rather than jumping into them, led to a shallow read that missed out on a lot of opportunities to go more into depth. None of this is to say it isn’t a good book, but it isn’t the book for me. Perhaps my initial expectations tainted my reading experience from the beginning, or maybe this just isn’t a genre that I’m as interested in as I used to. So I won’t recommend that you read (or not read) it because you might love it!
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