The Severe and Persistent Mental Illness Progress Notes Planner (Practice Planners Series)

The Severe and Persistent Mental Illness Progress Notes Planner (Practice Planners Series)

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Overview

The Severe and Persistent Mental Illness Progress Notes Planner (Practice Planners Series) by David J. Berghuis, Arthur E. Jongsma Jr., Arthur E. Jongsma

This timesaving resource features:

• Progress notes components for 25 behaviorally based presenting problems that correlate with The Severe and Persistent Mental Illness Treatment Planner

• Over 1,000 prewritten progress notes describing client presentation and interventions implemented

• Prewritten progress notes that can be quickly adapted to fit a particular client need or treatment situation

The Severe and Persistent Mental Illness Progress Notes Planner contains complete prewritten session and patient presentation descriptions for each behavioral problem in The Severe and Persistent Mental Illness Treatment Planner. The prewritten progress notes can be easily and quickly adapted to fit a particular client need or treatment situation.

• Saves you hours of time-consuming paperwork, yet offers the freedom to develop customized progress notes

• Organized around 25 main presenting problems that range from antisocial behavior and eating disorders to anxiety, substance abuse, gambling, and others

• Features over 1,000 prewritten progress notes (summarizing patient presentation, themes of session, and treatment delivered)

• Provides an array of treatment approaches that correspond with the behavioral problems and DSM-IV(TM) diagnostic categories in The Severe and Persistent Mental Illness Treatment Planner

• Offers sample progress notes that conform to the requirements of most third-party payers and accrediting agencies, including the JCAHO and the NCQA

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780471219866
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 11/25/2002
Series: PracticePlanners Series , #133
Pages: 382
Product dimensions: 8.56(w) x 10.98(h) x 1.09(d)

About the Author

ARTHUR E. JONGSMA, Jr., PhD, is Series Editor for the bestselling PracticePlanners. He is also the founder and Director of Psychological Consultants, a group private practice in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
DAVID J. BERGHUIS, MA, LLP, is in private practice and has worked in community mental health for over eleven years. He is the coauthor of The Severe and Persistent Mental Illness Treatment Planner.

Read an Excerpt

ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING (ADLs)

CLIENT PRESENTATION

1. Substandard Grooming and Hygiene (1)

A. The client came to the session poorly groomed.

B. The client displayed poor grooming, as evidenced by strong body odor, disheveled hair, or dirty clothing.

C. Others have noted that the client displays substandard grooming and hygiene.

D. The client has begun to show an increased focus on his/her hygiene and grooming.

E. The clients hygiene and grooming have been appropriate, with clean clothing and no strong body odor.

2. Failure to Use Basic Hygiene Techniques (2)

A. The client gave evidence of a failure to use basic hygiene techniques, such as bathing, brushing his/her teeth, or washing his/her clothes.

B. When questioned about his/her basic hygiene techniques, the client reported that he/she rarely bathes, brushes his/her teeth, or washes his/her clothes.

C. The client has begun to bathe, brush his/her teeth, and dress himself/herself in clean clothes on a regular basis.

D. The client displayed increased personal care through the use of basic hygiene techniques.

3. Medical Problems (3)

A. The clients poor hygiene has caused specific medical problems.

B. The client is experiencing dental difficulties due to his/her poor hygiene.

C. Due to the clients poor personal hygiene, he/she is experiencing medical problems that put others at risk.

D. As the client has improved his/her personal hygiene, his/her medical problems have decreased.

4. Poor Diet (4)

A. Due to the clients inability to cook meals properly, he/she hasexperienced deficiencies in his/her diet.

B. The client makes poor food selections, which has caused deficiencies in his/her diet.

C. The client has displayed an increased understanding of and willingness to use a healthier diet.

D. As the clients diet has improved, his/her overall level of physical functioning has improved.

5. Impaired Reality Testing (5)

A. The clients impaired reality testing and bizarre behaviors cause problems with his/her performance of activities of daily living (ADLs).

B. The clients decreased reality testing causes him/her to have a decreased motivation to perform ADLs.

C. As the client has become more reality focused, his/her completion of ADLs has increased.

6. Social Skills Deficits (6)

A. The client displayed poor social interaction skills.

B. The client displayed poor eye contact, insufficient interpersonal attending, and awkward social responses.

C. As the clients severe and persistent mental illness symptoms have stabilized, his/her interaction skills have increased.

D. The client now displays more appropriate eye contact, interpersonal attending skills, and social responses.

7. Others Excuse Poor ADLs (7)

A. The client described a history of others excusing his/her poor performance on ADLs.

B. The clients family and friends rarely confront him/her on his/her poor performance on ADLs, as they believe this to be an inevitable component of his/her mental illness.

C. Friends and family members have become more direct with the client about giving feedback regarding his/her performance on ADLs.

D. The clients performance on ADLs has increased, as others have expected increased responsibility from him/her.

8. Inadequate Knowledge Regarding ADLs (8)

A. The client displayed an inadequate level of knowledge or functioning in basic skills around the home.

B. The client indicated that he/she has little experience in doing basic ADLs around the home (e.g., cleaning floors, washing dishes, disposing of garbage, keeping fresh food available).

C. As the client has gained specific knowledge about how to perform basic duties around the home, his/her ADLs have become more appropriate.

9. Losses Due to Poor Hygiene (9)

A. The client described that he/she has experienced loss of relationship, employment, or other social opportunities due to his/her poor hygiene and inadequate attention to grooming.

B. The clients family, friends, and employer have all indicated a decreased desire to be involved with him/her due to his/her poor hygiene and inadequate attention to grooming.

C. As the clients hygiene and grooming have improved, he/she has experienced improvement in relationships, employer acceptance, and other social opportunities.

INTERVENTIONS IMPLEMENTED

1. Assign Inventory of ADLs (1)

A. The client was asked to prepare an inventory of positive and negative functioning regarding his/her ADLs.

B. The client prepared his/her inventory of positive and negative functioning regarding ADLs, and this was reviewed within the session.

C. The client was given positive feedback regarding his/her accurate inventory of positive and negative functioning regarding ADLs.

D. The client has prepared his/her inventory of positive and negative functioning regarding ADLs but needed additional feedback to develop an accurate assessment.

E. The client has not prepared an inventory of positive and negative functioning regarding ADLs and was redirected to do so.

2. Assign Obtaining Feedback (2)

A. The client was asked to identify a trusted individual from whom he/she can obtain helpful feedback regarding daily hygiene and grooming.

B. The client has received helpful feedback regarding his/her daily hygiene and grooming, and this was reviewed within the session.

C. The client has declined to seek or use any feedback regarding his/her daily hygiene and grooming and was redirected to complete this assignment.

3. Refer to a Dietician (3)

A. The client was referred to a dietician for an assessment regarding basic nutritional knowledge and skills, usual diet, and nutritional deficiencies.

B. The client reported that he/she has met with the dietician, and the results of his/her assessment were reviewed.

C. The client displayed an understanding of his/her nutritional functioning as the assessment was reviewed.

D. The client displayed a lack of understanding about the information contained in the nutritional assessment and was provided with additional feedback in this area.

E. The client has not followed through on his/her referral to a dietician and was redirected to do so.

4. Review Rejection (4)

A. The client was asked to identify painful experiences in which rejection was experienced due to the lack of performance of basic ADLs.

B. The client was provided with empathy as he/she identified painful experiences in which rejection was experienced due to the lack of performance of basic ADLs.

C. The clients broken relationships, loss of employment, and other painful experiences were reviewed within the session.

D. The client could not identify painful experiences related to poor performance of basic ADLs and was asked to continue to focus in these areas.

5. Teach Possible Positive Outcomes (5)

A. The client was assisted in visualizing the possible positive changes that could occur from his/her increased attention to appearance and other daily living skills.

B. The client was supported and reinforced as he/she identified positive results that would occur due to his/her increased attention to appearance and other daily living skills.

C. The client struggled to identify positive results that could occur from his/her giving increased attention to appearance and other daily living skills and was provided with additional feedback about these areas.

6. Review Medical Risks (6)

A. Specific medical risks associated with poor hygiene and nutrition or lack of attention to other ADLs were reviewed.

B. Medical risks (e.g., dental problems, risk of infection, lice, and other health problems) were identified and discussed.

C. The client was assisted in developing an understanding about the medical risks associated with poor nutrition and hygiene or lack of attention to other ADLs.

D. The client agreed that he/she is at a higher medical risk due to poor nutrition and hygiene or lack of attention to other ADLs and was focused on remediation efforts.

E. The client rejected the identified concerns regarding medical risks.

7. Facilitate Expressing Emotions (7)

A. The client was assisted in expressing his/her emotions related to impaired performance in ADLs.

B. The client was assisted in identifying specific emotions regarding impaired performance in ADLs (e.g., embarrassment, depression, and low self-esteem).

C. Empathy was provided to the client as he/she expressed his/her emotions regarding impaired performance in ADLs.

D. The client was reluctant to admit to any negative emotions regarding impaired performance of ADLs and was provided with feedback about likely emotions that he/she may experience.

8. Identify Secondary Gain (8)

A. The possible secondary gain associated with decreased ADL functioning was reviewed.

B. The client identified specific secondary gains that he/she has attained for decreased functioning in ADLs (e.g., less involvement in potentially difficult social situations), and these were reviewed within the session.

C. The client denied any pattern of secondary gain related to decreased functioning in his/her ADLs and was provided with hypothetical examples of the secondary gains.

9. Identify Needed ADLs (9)

A. The client was assisted in identifying those ADLs that are desired but are not present in his/her current repertoire.

B. The client received feedback regarding his/her description of ADLs that he/she wished to increase.

C. The client was unable to identify specific ADLs that he/she wishes to increase and was encouraged to review this area.

10. Prioritize ADLs (10)

A. The client was asked to prioritize on which ADLs he/she would like to focus in order to improve his/her functioning.

B. The client was given feedback about his/her choice of ADLs to focus on implementing.

C. The client was informed about the specific skills that he/she will need to learn in order to implement the use of individual ADLs.

D. The client struggled to prioritize which ADLs he/she wishes to use and was redirected to do so.

11. Refer for Psychological Testing (11)

A. The client was referred for an assessment of cognitive abilities and deficits.

B. Objective psychological testing was administered to the client to assess his/her cognitive strengths and weaknesses.

C. The client cooperated with the psychological testing, and he/she received feedback about the results.

D. The psychological testing confirmed the presence of specific cognitive abilities and deficits.

E. The client was not compliant with taking the psychological evaluation and was encouraged to participate completely.

12. Recommend Remediating Programs (12)

A. The client was referred to remediating programs that are focused on removing deficits for performing ADLs, including skill-building groups, token economies, or behavior-shaping programs.

B. The client was assisted in remediating his/her deficits for performing ADLs through the use of skill-building groups, token economies, and behavior-shaping programs.

C. As specific programs have assisted the client in removing deficits for performing ADLs, his/her ADLs have gradually increased.

13. Educate about Mental Illness (13)

A. The client was educated about the expected or common symptoms of his/her mental illness, which may negatively impact basic ADL functioning.

B. As his/her symptoms of mental illness were discussed, the client displayed an understanding of how these symptoms may affect his/her ADL functioning.

C. The client struggled to identify how symptoms of his/her mental illness may negatively impact basic ADL functioning and was given additional feedback in this area.

14. Interpret Psychiatric Decompensation (14)

A. The clients poor performance on ADLs was interpreted as an indicator of psychiatric decompensation.

B. The clients pattern of poor ADLs and psychiatric decompensation was shared with the client, caregivers, and medical staff.

C. The client acknowledged his/her poor performance on ADLs as prodromals of his/her psychiatric decompensation, and this was supported during the session.

D. The client, caregivers, and medical staff concurred regarding the clients general psychiatric decompensation.

E. The client denied psychiatric decompensation, despite being told that his/her poor performance on ADLs is an indication of psychiatric decompensation.

15. Refer to a Physician (15)

A. The client was referred to a physician for an evaluation for a prescription of psychotropic medications.

B. The client was reinforced for following through on a referral to a physician for an assessment for a prescription of psychotropic medications, but none were prescribed.

C. The client has been prescribed psychotropic medications.

D. The client declined evaluation by a physician for a prescription of psychotropic medications and was redirected to cooperate with this referral.

16. Educate about Psychotropic Medications (16)

A. The client was taught about the indications for and the expected benefits of psychotropic medications.

B. As the clients psychotropic medications were reviewed, he/she displayed an understanding about the indications for and expected benefits of the medications.

C. The client displayed a lack of understanding of the indications for and expected benefits of psychotropic medications and was provided with additional information and feedback regarding his/her medications.

17. Monitor Medications (17)

A. The client was monitored for compliance with his/her psychotropic medication regimen.

B. The client was provided with positive feedback about his/her regular use of psychotropic medications.

C. The client was monitored for the effectiveness and side effects of his/her prescribed medications.

D. Concerns about the effectiveness and side effects of the clients medications were communicated to the physician.

E. Although the client was monitored for side effects from the medications, he/she reported no concerns in this area.

18. Organize Medications (18)

A. The client was provided with a pillbox for organizing and coordinating each dose of his/her medications.

B. The client was taught about the proper use of the medication compliance packaging/ reminder system.

C. The client was tested on his/her understanding of the use of the medication compliance packaging/reminder system.

D. The client was provided with positive feedback about his/her regular use of the pillbox to organize his/her medications.

E. The client has not used the pillbox to organize his/her medications and was redirected to do so.

19. Coordinate Medication Compliance Oversight (19)

A. Family members and/or caregivers were instructed on how to regularly dispense and/or monitor the clients medication compliance.

B. Family members and/or caregivers indicated an understanding of how to monitor the clients medication compliance.

C. The clients medication compliance was reviewed, and family members and/or caregivers indicated that he/she is regularly medication compliant.

D. Family members and/or caregivers indicated that the client is not medication compliant, and this was reviewed with the client.

20. Review Side Effects of Medications (20)

A. The possible side effects of the clients medications were reviewed with him/her.

B. The client identified significant medication side effects, and these were reported to the medical staff.

C. Possible side effects of the clients medications were reviewed, but he/she denied experiencing any side effects.

21. Arrange for a Physical Examination (21)

A. A full physical examination was arranged for the client, and the physician was encouraged to prescribe remediation programs to aid the client in performing ADLs.

B. A physician examined the client, and specific negative medical effects of low functioning on ADLs were identified.

C. The physician has identified specific recommendations to help remediate the effects of the clients poor ADL skills.

D. The physician has not identified any physical effects related to the clients poor performance on ADLs.

E. Specific ADL remediation behaviors were reviewed with the client.

22. Refer to a Dentist (22)

A. The client was referred to a dentist to determine dental treatment needs.

B. Specific dental treatment needs were identified, and ongoing dental treatment was coordinated.

C. No specific dental treatment needs were identified, but a routine follow-up appointment was made.

D. The client has not followed through on the referral for dental services and was redirected to do so.

23. Provide Educational Material (23)

A. The client was provided with educational material to help him/her learn basic personal hygiene skills.

B. The client was referred to specific portions of books and videos on the topic of personal hygiene.

C. The client was referred to written material such as The Complete Guide to Better Dental Care (Taintor and Taintor) or The New Wellness Encyclopedia (Editors of University of California-Berkeley).

D. The client has surveyed the educational material, and important points were reviewed within the session.

E. The client has not reviewed the educational material and was requested to do so.

24. Refer for One-to-One Training (24)

A. The client was referred to the agency medical staff for one-to-one training in basic hygiene needs and techniques.

B. The client has reviewed specific hygiene needs and techniques with the agency medical staff and was supported for this.

C. The client has not yet met with agency medical staff for one-to-one training in basic hygiene needs and techniques and was redirected to do so.

25. Refer to a Psychoeducational Group (25)

A. The client was referred to a psychoeducational group focused on teaching personal hygiene skills.

B. The psychoeducational group was used to help the client learn to give and receive feedback about hygiene skill implementation.

C. The client has attended a psychoeducational group and received feedback about hygiene skill implementation, which was processed within the session.

D. The client was verbally reinforced for using the group feedback about hygiene skill implementation.

E. The client has not attended the psychoeducational group for hygiene skill implementation and was redirected to do so.

26. Encourage Scheduled Hygiene Performance (26)

A. The client was encouraged to perform basic hygiene skills on a regular schedule (e.g., the same time and in the same order each day).

B. The client was reinforced for his/her pattern of performing basic hygiene skills on a regular schedule.

C. The client has not performed his/her personal hygiene skills on a scheduled basis and was redirected to do so.

27. Refer to Behavioral Treatment (27)

A. The client was referred to a behavioral treatment specialist to develop and implement a program to monitor and reward the regular use of ADL techniques.

B. An individualized behavioral treatment plan has been developed to monitor and reward the clients regular use of ADL techniques.

C. As the client has increased his/her regular use of ADL techniques, he/she has earned rewards within the behavioral treatment plan.

D. The clients increased completion of ADLs through the use of a behavioral treatment plan was reviewed.

E. The client has resisted compliance with a behavioral treatment plan to monitor and reward the regular use of his/her ADL techniques and was redirected to do so.

28. Teach Self-Monitoring (28)

A. The client was assisted in developing a self-monitoring program for performing his/her ADLs.

B. The client was supported in his/her use of a checkoff chart for performing his/her ADLs.

C. The client was provided with positive feedback and encouragement regarding his/her use of a self-monitoring program for performing ADLs.

D. The client has not implemented or used a self-monitoring program for performing ADLs and was encouraged to do so.

29. Provide Feedback (29)

A. The client was provided with feedback about progress in his/her use of selfmonitoring to improve personal hygiene.

B. The client appeared to react positively to the feedback that was given regarding his/her progress in the use of self-monitoring to improve performance of ADLs.

C. The client accepted the negative feedback that was given regarding his/her lack of use of self-monitoring to improve personal hygiene.

30. Review Community Resources (30)

A. A list of community resources was reviewed with the client to assist him/her in improving his/her personal appearance (e.g., laundromat/dry cleaner, hair salon/barber).

B. As community resources were reviewed, the client displayed an understanding and commitment to use appropriate community resources.

C. The client has not used community resources to improve his/her personal appearance and was provided with additional encouragement to do so.

31. Arrange for a Tour of Community Resources (31)

A. Arrangements were made for the client to tour community facilities for cleaning and pressing clothes, cutting and styling hair, or purchasing soap and deodorant.

B. As the community resources were reviewed, the client showed an increased understanding of how these resources can be used to improve performance of ADLs.

C. The client continued to display a lack of understanding about the use of community facilities to assist in performing ADLs, and this information was reiterated.

32. Assess for Substance Abuse (32)

A. The client was assessed for substance abuse that may exacerbate poor performance in ADLs.

B. The client was identified as having a concomitant substance abuse problem.

C. Upon review, the client does not display evidence of a substance abuse problem.

33. Refer for Substance Abuse Treatment (33)

A. The client was referred to a 12-step recovery program (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous).

B. The client was referred to a substance abuse treatment program.

C. The client has been admitted to a substance abuse treatment program and was supported for this follow-through.

D. The client has refused the referral to a substance abuse treatment program, and this refusal was processed.

34. Integrate Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment (34)

A. The clients mental health and substance abuse treatment services were coordinated in an integrated fashion.

B. The clients substance abuse treatment providers have been provided with increased information about the clients mental health diagnosis and treatment.

C. The clients mental health treatment providers have been provided with increased information about the clients substance abuse diagnosis and treatment.

35. Facilitate Training from Support System (35)

A. The clients family members, friends, and caregivers were facilitated to assist in training the client in basic housekeeping skills.

B. Family members, friends, and caregivers were requested to monitor and report on the clients progress regarding basic housekeeping skills.

C. Family members, friends, and caregivers were reinforced for regularly providing training to the client on basic housekeeping skills and reporting on his/her progress.

D. Family members, friends, and caregivers do not regularly provide options for the client to learn basic housekeeping skills and were redirected to do so.

36. Teach Housekeeping Skills (36)

A. The client was taught about basic housekeeping skills through references to books on this subject.

B. As the client has been taught basic housekeeping skills, he/she has displayed an increased understanding of these needs and techniques.

C. The client continues to display a lack of understanding of basic housekeeping skills, and this information was presented again in a different fashion.

37. Provide Cleaning Feedback (37)

A. The client was given feedback about the care of his/her personal area, apartment, or home.

B. The client appeared to be reinforced by the positive feedback that he/she has received about his/her personal area, apartment, or home.

C. The client was given negative feedback, which prompted him/her to pledge to improve his/her personal area, apartment, or home.

38. Encourage Family Members and/or Caregivers to Assign Chores (38)

A. The clients family members and/or caregivers were encouraged to provide regular assignment to the client of basic chores around the home.

B. Family members and/or caregivers were reinforced for having provided regular assignment of basic chores around the home.

C. Family members and/or caregivers have not provided regular assignment of basic chores around the home and were redirected to do so.

39. Teach Cooking Techniques (39)

A. The client was taught some basic cooking techniques.

B. Cookbooks were used to teach the client basic cooking techniques.

C. As the client has been taught about basic cooking techniques, he/she has displayed an increased understanding of food preparation.

D. The client displayed a lack of understanding of food preparation procedures and was provided with additional remedial information in this area.

40. Refer/Conduct a Dietary Group (40)

A. The client was referred to a psychoeducational group focused on teaching cooking skills and dietary needs.

B. The client displayed an increased understanding of dietary needs and cooking skills as a result of involvement in the psychoeducational group.

C. The client has not attended the psychoeducational group focused on teaching cooking skills and dietary needs and was redirected to do so.

41. Monitor Dietary Recommendations (41)

A. The client was monitored for follow-through regarding a dieticians recommendations for changes in his/her eating practices.

B. The client was provided with positive feedback for consistently following through on the recommended changes to his/her cooking and eating practices.

C. The client was provided with negative feedback regarding his/her failure to use the dieticians recommendations, which prompted his/her pledge to improve in this area.

42. Facilitate a Community Education Class (42)

A. The clients enrollment in a community education cooking class or seminar was facilitated.

B. The client was supported for his/her regular attendance to a community education cooking class or seminar.

C. The client has not regularly attended the community education class or seminar, and his/her irregular attendance was processed to resolution.

43. Refer to an Activity Therapist (43)

A. The client was referred to an activity therapist for recommendations regarding physical fitness activities that are available in the community.

B. The client was referred to community physical fitness resources (e.g., health clubs and other recreational programs).

C. The client has been actively participating in community physical fitness programs and was reinforced for this.

D. The client has declined involvement in community physical fitness programs and was redirected to do so.

44. Assist in Setting Exercise Goals (44)

A. The client was assisted in setting specific exercise goals.

B. The clients participation in exercise and physical fitness activities was monitored.

C. The client reported regular participation in exercise and physical fitness activities and was reinforced for this.

D. The client reported very limited participation in exercise and physical fitness activities and was encouraged to increase his/her participation.

45. Provide Physical Fitness Educational Material (45)

A. Educational material regarding physical fitness was provided to the client.

B. The client displayed an increased understanding of physical fitness as a result of reviewing physical fitness educational material.

C. The client has not read the physical fitness educational material and was redirected to do so.

46. Coordinate a Health Club Membership (46)

A. The clients membership at a local health club or YMCA/YWCA was facilitated.

B. The client has joined a local health club or YMCA/YWCA fitness program and was reinforced for doing so.

C. The client has not used local resources for fitness programs and was redirected to do so.

47. Review for Safety Hazards (47)

A. The clients living situation was inspected for potential safety hazards.

B. The client has identified potential safety hazards and these were reviewed.

C. The client was assisted in remediating his/her potential safety hazards in his/her home.

D. The client has not remediated his/her potential home safety hazards and was redirected to do so.

48. Assist in Advocating Resolution of Safety Hazards (48)

A. The client was assisted with requests to the appropriate parties (landlord, home providers, or family members) to remediate home safety hazards.

B. The client was supported in his/her advocacy to remediate home safety hazards, insect infestations, and other concerns that would confound ADLs.

C. The client has not appropriately advocated for himself/herself regarding seeking resolution of home safety hazards, and he/she was given additional direction in this area.

49. Assist in Prioritizing Safety Concerns (49)

A. The client was assisted in prioritizing safety concerns that he/she has identified around his/her home.

B. The client was assisted in developing and implementing plans to make the home a safer environment.

C. The client has been able, with continued support, to increase safety factors around his/her home.

D. The client has not prioritized, developed, or implemented plans to make his/her home a safer environment and was redirected to do so.

50. Facilitate Involvement in Programs for Safety Equipment (50)

A. Arrangements were made for the client to become involved in programs that assist him/her in procuring safety equipment (e.g., free smoke or carbon monoxide detectors).

B. The client was provided with support for his/her pursuit of programs that assist with procuring safety equipment.

C. The client has not used programs to assist himself/herself with procuring needed safety equipment and was directed to follow up on this.

51. Teach about High-Risk Sexual Behaviors (51)

A. The client was taught about high-risk sexual behaviors.

B. The client was referred to a free condom program to decrease the risk in his/her sexual behaviors.

C. The clients understanding of his/her high-risk sexual behaviors and how to remediate these concerns was reviewed.

D. The client has implemented precautions to decrease his/her risk of sexually transmitted disease and was provided with positive feedback for these changes.

E. The client does not appear to understand or use appropriate precautions regarding his/her high-risk sexual behaviors and was reeducated about these issues.

52. Teach Remediation of High-Risk Drug Use Behaviors (52)

A. The client was taught about the serious risk that is involved with sharing needles for drug abuse.

B. The client was referred to a needle exchange program.

C. The client was referred to a substance abuse treatment program.

D. The client reported a decreased pattern of high-risk drug abuse behaviors and was provided with positive reinforcement for this change.

E. The client has not used techniques to decrease his/her high-risk drug abuse behaviors and was redirected to do so.

53. Identify Prodromal Symptoms (53)

A. The clients behaviors were interpreted to him/her as possible signs of psychosis, mania, or other severe and persistent mental illness.

B. The clients prodromal symptoms were identified as concerns that could increase the potential for harm to self or others and decrease his/her ability to care for his/her own basic needs.

C. The client was provided with positive feedback for his/her ability to accept concerns related to his/her prodromal symptoms.

D. The client did not identify his/her prodromal symptoms and was given additional feedback regarding the need for treatment.

54. Assist in Developing Intervention Plans (54)

A. The client was assisted in developing intervention plans to avoid injury, poisoning, or other self-care problems during periods of mania, psychosis, or other decompensation.

B. The client reiterated specific procedures to obtain assistance when decompensating, including calling a treatment hotline, contacting a therapist or physician, or going to the hospital emergency department, and was supported for his/her plan.

C. The client displayed an understanding of his/her crisis intervention plan and was provided with positive feedback and reminders in this area.

D. The client has not developed a crisis intervention plan and was provided with more direct information in this area.

55. Assess the Need for Alternative Care (55)

A. The clients needs regarding alternative care were assessed.

B. The client was recommended for transfer to an alternative setting to provide respite to his/her caregivers.

C. Arrangements were made for the client to receive respite care in order to reduce the stress level of his/her caregivers.

D. The client would not accept transfer to an alternative care setting; therefore, other stress reduction measures must be sought for the caregivers.

56. Provide Caregiver Training (56)

A. The clients caregivers were provided with training regarding his/her pertinent diagnostic symptoms.

B. The clients caregivers were provided with training regarding techniques to reduce their personal stress level.

C. As the clients caregivers have learned techniques for stress management and how to respond to his/her pertinent diagnostic symptoms, the caregivers mood has improved.

57. Refer the Caregivers to a Provider Group (57)

A. The clients caregivers were referred to a stress management or support group that is specifically designed for providers of care for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness.

B. The clients caregivers were reinforced for attending the stress management and support groups.

C. The clients caregivers have not used the stress management or support groups and were redirected to do so.

Table of Contents

Series Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

Activities of Daily Living (ADL).

Aging.

Anger Management.

Anxiety.

Chemical Dependence.

Depression.

Employment Problems.

Family Conflicts.

Financial Needs.

Grief and Loss.

Health Issues.

Homelessness.

Independent Activities of Daily Living (IADL).

Intimate Relationship Conflicts.

Legal Concerns.

Mania/Hypomania.

Medication Management.

Paranoia.

Parenting.

Psychosis.

Recreation.

Self-Determination.

Sexuality Concerns.

Social Skills.

Suicidal Ideation.

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