Shakespeare Study Programs

Shakespeare Study Programs

by Charlotte Porter, Helen A. Clarke

Paperback

$34.99

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781421943688
Publisher: IndyPublish.com
Publication date: 06/28/2005
Pages: 120
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.28(d)

Read an Excerpt


LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST Shakespeare makes us laugh in "Loves Labour's Lost" at the futility of the attempt of ascetic and academic men to shut out love and women from their schemes of life and study. His early work in putting the past history of England into dramatic form may possibly have suggested to him to put more recent history on the stage by means of this Comedy. Light as it is, the point of it is to satirize the monastic and exclusive element in current educational schemes. Fictitious as the story is, it touches upon names and incidents belonging to actual history. So familiar were these actual happenings of the day to his audience that it could especially enjoy these veiled allusions to them. The main idea of the plot of the Comedy—the"Academe," was one that had a bearing upon various similarly named educational projects of that time in England. One such scheme was drawn up about 1570, by Sir Humphrey Gilbert, Sir Walter Raleigh's half-brother, for the "education of her Majeste's Wardes and others the youths of nobility and gentlemen." This plan was, like Shakespeare's arranged for a "three yeeres terme" (I, i, 20) and at the end of "every three years" some book was to be published which would represent the fruit of the Academy's study during that period. Merely the title of this scheme—"Queen Elizabethes Achademy" may havesuggested Shakespeare's "Achademe" (I, i, 17). Of course, however, both Gilbert's and Shakespeare's adoption of the name are examples of the appropriation by educational groups of the classic academes of the Philosophers of Athens and their student followers. Another educational plan "for the bringing up in vertue and learning of the QueenesMajestis Wardes," was devised by Sir Nicholas Bacon, in 1561. Later, in the reign of James I, the establ...

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