Shaman's Crossing (Soldier Son Series #1)

Shaman's Crossing (Soldier Son Series #1)

by Robin Hobb
3.9 77

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Shaman's Crossing 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 77 reviews.
Vanguard-TM More than 1 year ago
I have read some really negative reviews about this series. I was even told to skip it completely. But I rarely do as I am told and wanted to make up my own mind. The first book is good. Not great. But not as bad as I was lead to believe. The writing is good. The characters are real although they do fall short of being truly likable. I recommend reading the Farseer series first. And saving this one for last or near to last. But if you're a fan I think you might find something here to like.
kayek1 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book, even though Navarre was not my favorite character. He was trying so hard to be the perfect son and perfect soldier son that sometimes what he did was more wrong than right. He also tried so hard to fight the Speck magic that threatened not only to take his soul, but make it impossible to be the perfect son. However, it was an interesting look into a young boy to man's journey. I'm looking forward to seeing what the next book has in store for Navarre.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This series.is.a real departure for Hobb. It is really dark and wrestles with big, ugly issues around race, colonization, and ecology, If you are an Octavia Butler fan, this is for you. If you like dragons and a more conventional narrative, read her next Rainwild series instead.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This does not hold up the high standards I expected from Robin Hobb. It obsesses about the soldier son fact to the point of ad nausea. All the military information makes the book extremely slow and not in a good way. The female characters were bland and so were many of the males. The story line had little action that was interesting. Still, it was slightly gripping and was a decent book, but certainly not her best.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I finished this book about three weeks ago and Im stiil raving over it. Ive given it to a couple of big reader friends and they all rave over it as well. I couldn't find a better book. The politics in it are something else and you can almost see the sceans concerning the Tree Woman and the Dark Night. Killer good book and recomend it to any reader!
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was okay, for a fantasy beginner. It was boring though, and very hard to get into. I might be a little biased, having read Hobb's other books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A successful novel requires a well-laid background to support the premise and characterizations the author is promoting. Robin Hobb does just that in SHAMAN'S CROSSING, with intensity. Hobb's attention to writing a novel with an 'ease-of-flow grasp' of the building backdrop is meticulously nurtured for the reader's benefit. The story of Nevare Burvelle and his journey promises page-to-page consistency, propelling the reader's interest forward as the story builds and unfolds. Nevare Burvelle is the second son destined from birth to carry a sword, a 'soldier's second son', the heritage from his once-soldier father who was made a noble by the King of Gernia. Nevare's destiny is to attend the King's Cavella Academy. He prepares during his youth with tutors -- equestrian, studies of mathematics, and the like. At 16, his father gives Nevare to an enemy, a Kidona Plainsman: ruthless Dewara for instruction in survival, and temperament. Dewara leads Nevare on a very painful path both mentally and physically, with some mysticism. Nevare was warned that the Plainspeople use 'tricks'. People who do not ride the Plains of the Midlands say they are 'flat and featureless' and 'roll on endlessly'. Nevare's thoughts have the author Hobb's special touch of expression: 'I had grown up on the Midlands and knew well how deceptive their gentle rises and falls could be. Ravines and sudden crevasses smiled with hidden mouths, just waiting to devour the unwary rider. Even the gentle hollows were often deep enough to conceal mounted men or browsing deer. What the unschooled eye might interpret as scrub brush in the distance could prove to be a shoulder-high patch of sickle-berry, almost impenetrable to a man on horseback.' Nevare narrates¿ As dictated by the 'Writ' , 'I was the son of a noble. 'Of those who bend the knee only to the king, let them have sons in plenitude. The first for an heir, the second to wear the sword, the third to serve as priest, the fourth to labor for beauty's sake, the fifth to gather knowledge¿' and so on. I'd never bothered to memorize the rest of that passage. I had my place and I knew it. I was the second son¿ Nevare enters the cavalla with little knowledge of why the old aristocracy looks down on him as the son of a 'new noble', and is unprepared for the political and social maneuvering of the deeply competitive school and city, especially the 'meanness' of the old nobles' sons. Making a circle of friends within his new noble status, Nevare finds himself entangled in a web of injustice, discrimination, and foul play. And the lessons are painful¿ Hobb's writing is great swords-and-sorcery, with the feeling of modern military schooling and prejudices, and the author's world building is superb and intelligently related to the reader. The heart-thumping, sword-clashing action that Hobb creates, offers a world-class fantasy saga, a heart-rending examination of the consequences of duty and love. Thank you Robin Hobb for an outstanding performance in a wondrous genre, with great narrative sequences.
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The pages flew by as the story is good and keeps you flipping pages
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GLTurner1 More than 1 year ago
A somewhat interesting tale, but I couldn't really get into the story line or the characters that much, although I tried. Makes me miss the Farseer, Liveship, and Tawny Man trilogies even more. *sigh*
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