She Makes It Look Easy: A Novel

She Makes It Look Easy: A Novel

by Marybeth Whalen
3.8 18

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Overview

She Makes It Look Easy: A Novel by Marybeth Whalen

Ariel Baxter has just moved into the neighborhood of her dreams. The chaos of domestic life and the loneliness of motherhood, however, moved with her. Then she meets her neighbor, Justine Miller. Justine ushers Ariel into a world of clutter-free houses, fresh-baked bread, homemade crafts, neighborhood playdates, and organization techniques designed to make marriage better and parenting manageable. Soon Ariel realizes there is hope for peace, friendship, and clean kitchen counters. But when rumors start to circulate about Justine’s real home life, Ariel must choose whether to believe the best about the friend she admires or consider the possibility that “perfection” isn’t always what it seems to be. A novel for every woman who has looked at another woman’s life and said, “I want what she has,” She Makes It Look Easy reminds us of the danger of pedestals and the beauty of authentic friendship.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781434703897
Publisher: David C Cook
Publication date: 06/01/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 462,557
File size: 523 KB

About the Author

Marybeth Whalen (www.marybethwhalen.com) is the author of the novel The Mailbox, a member of the Proverbs 31 Ministries writing team, and a nationwide speaker to women’s groups. She lives with her husband and their six children outside Charlotte, North Carolina. 

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She Makes It Look Easy 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
AuthorMaryDeMuth More than 1 year ago
I devoured this book, though it haunted me. Whalen has an uncanny ability to capture the mind of a woman and reveal how thoughts can become devastating actions. Her characters are spot-on real, so much so I wanted to yell at them! I loved that this story moved in the direction it did, as it served as a beautiful cautionary tale. Excellent writing, page turning story.
AlyciaM More than 1 year ago
Ariel Baxter has always dreamed of living in Essex Falls. The suburbian life woos her into thinking she can have the perfect life. The perfect house. The white picket fence. The adoring husband. The well-behaved children. The perfect friends. An organized life is what she desires. And Justine appears to have it all. But does she? And will Ariel fall into Justine's trap? Or will she find the courage to stand for what is truly right in life? Marybeth Whalen has written another incredible novel. I consider it to be a well-written, suspenseful-suburban-women-life read. It touches on a topic that would make most Christian women cringe but is extremely relevant in the lives of many women around us. I applaud her for the honesty of her characters and the fact that she never once sugar-coats or underplays the issue at hand. This book is a bold statement many women should not ignore.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not a $10 read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really loved how we got into the 2 main characters thoughts. The quote about how maybe we women are all like Eve in the Garden of Eden never satisfied, even when you have the husband, kids, house, really hit home. Great light read about deep issues.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
sneps More than 1 year ago
Excellent Women's Christian Fiction Book!Everyone knows someone who seems like she has it all together, is always dressed so nicely, make-up on, hair done, Bible in hand or scriptures ready to share, a clean house, baked break or cookies in the oven, and a seemingly perfect life. At least, I can think of a few people in my own life that seem that way to me. Now, that is not to say that they are probably a Justine…with skeletons in their closet and secretly unhappy. However, I have often wondered, “what’s it really like?”. If you know someone like that and feel complete opposite, then you will certainly resonate with this book. If you don’t know someone like that, or perhaps you are a Justine-strong A type personality then you will certainly enjoy this book, too. Overall, this is a story that takes us behind closed doors, where church members don’t have access, where the process to do everything perfectly isn’t always shared…only the end results-perfection! I loved this book and could relate to Ariel as she tries to keep up with the Joneses, so to speak, in a spiritual and Godly way. Her dream is to move into this posh neighborhood, Essex Falls, and she begins working as a freelance photographer to help save money for the move. Her husband, ever so frugal, really doesn’t want to move because it will mean that he will need to take another higher paying job and be away from the family more. However, Ariel soon gets her wish and moves into the neighborhood of her dreams where children play and parents have neighborhood parties. Living behind the main neighbor in charge of these soiree’s, Ariel soon begins to feel inadequate as she tries to maintain a clean home, bake bread and cookies, and manage her children, all with a gorgeous smile and crisp clothes. Justine invites her to a church meeting, where Justine discusses Godly orderliness and Ariel finds herself trying to emulate Justine at home and in the neighborhood. However, nothing is ever as it truly seems. While Justine is painting this perfect picture of a Godly household, inside, she is hurt and angry, feels empty in her marriage, and soon seeks solace in the arms of an old flame. Marybeth gets so deep into the minds and thoughts of the characters, that the scenarios and actions of each character seem so real and authentic. Both Justine and Ariel have decisions they have to make and decide where their loyalties lie, and determine the fate of their friendship and of their marriages. This is an excellent story and gives great discussion opportunities for a church reading group and book club. I loved this book and would highly recommend it to anyone that enjoys Christian fiction.-Books in the Burbs
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was my first book by the author and it totally captured my attention. I HAD to keep reading chapter after chapter. It is a Christian fiction novel but it does not have a lot of Christian "lingo" to wash away a good story. The women in the story make a lot of choices based on their characters and that is where you will see the Christian influence. One negative is that a couple of pages got stuck around page 140-152 and I had to skip to each page in order to read. I would read more books by this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I got wrapped up in this book quickly and found myself looking forward to reading more. The author did an amazing job of making me feel like I was there, in the nieghborhood. The story really makes one think of all of the gossip and petty things tbat happen in real life. This could be my neighbors. Not too overly religous, just enough to remind us that God is at work. Normally I tend to shy away from this genre. But, I am glad I took a shot!
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harstan More than 1 year ago
In Essex Falls Ariel Baxter is the mother of three rambunctious sons (eight year old Donovan, six year old Dylan, and four year old Duncan). She works hard at her family photography business while her husband's work schedule leaves them with little time between them. Her prime pet peeve is how cheap her spouse is as he saves for a monsoon. The Miller family is the next door neighbor to the Baxter brood. To Ariel they are perfect. The matriarch Justine always dresses to perfection, the husband Mark insures the lawn is mowed and nice looking; the two daughters (Cameron and Caroline) are well behaved. Also neighbors are Betsy and Tom; he is Justine's former boyfriend. Ariel ignores single mom divorcee Erica as being impaired by not having a husband-father. Instead she emulates Justine the great organizer. Intriguing, readers will relish this fine neighborhood tale as Ariel learns perfection is not quite easy to achieve especially usually at exorbitant personal costs. The ensemble cast is fully developed so that readers can compare their traits just as Ariel did when she concludes Justine makes it look easy. However, as she learns more about her perfect neighbor Ariel begins to appreciate the brown patchy grass seems greener in her yard. This is an entertaining look at images and role models as nobody's perfect. Harriet Klausner