The Sheik

The Sheik

by E. M. Hull

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781978271760
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 10/13/2017
Pages: 134
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

E. M. Hull was the pseudonym of Edith Maude Winstanley.

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The Sheik 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Unending boredom
LadyRavenRAVE1 More than 1 year ago
Not bad for a romance novel written and release in 1919. Kept my interest and even if the Sheik was a bit harsh at time Diana was still a very strong woman. I really enjoyed this book some people may not like how Diana was treated but it is a book of fiction I have seen worst on TV and in other Books.
MissBHaven on LibraryThing 20 days ago
What an exciting book this was! Romance and adventure in the desert with a sheik who wants nothing more than to....well i wont say anymore but if you want to read a good romance then this one is definitely for you.
William_O_Brien More than 1 year ago
The Sheik by E. M. Hull An intriguing story to take you away to another place. Wonderful romance work - highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A book that shocked the New York Times reviewers in its day. A hit book of the 1920s, it became a movie starring Rudolph Valentino, The Sheik set the stage for today's romance novel. This groundbreaker created a genre of scandalous tales that spellbound women and men alike.
Tom Manne More than 1 year ago
"A tale of mystery, power and forbidden love fulfilled" is 100% accurate, but it's so much more. This is one of those stories that stays with you for a long time. Wow.
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Jacqueline Nareski More than 1 year ago
Without getting into sex scenes, the story is amazing and leaves everything to your imagination. Fantastic!
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Carie More than 1 year ago
It is a love story. No sex scenes but the struggle the captive had with understanding why she falls in love is enough to look past the no sex scenes. The captor is also struggling with coming to terms with love. Again a good short love story....
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manonfetch More than 1 year ago
The magnificence of this love story is the Sheik's growth from rapist and cruel captor to remorseful, adoring mate. Diana's courage and spirit change him, steal his heart, and open his eyes to the monster he has become. Her will is crushed by the Sheik; she is terrified of him, and with good reason. She watches him whip a man almost to death the first week she is his prisoner, and break a horse so brutally that he leaves it foaming and bloody. Still, she remains courageous. Every night he rapes her; every morning she pulls together the shredded remnants of her sanity and self respect and faces the day. She escapes into the desert with no water, no food, no compass, only her wit and her horse and her determination. Her horse leads her right back to the Sheik and she runs until he shoots her horse from under her. At this point the Stockholm Syndrome and PTSD she is suffering completely overwhelm her, and she succumbs to Trauma Bonding which she mistakes for love. Have gotten her back, the Sheik now treats her kindly. It is probable that finding her running in the desert, desperate to escape him, brings to his heart and mind the story of his abused Spanish mother, who also desperately ran from her husband, facing death in the desert rather than stay with her abuser. In his kindness, Diana's Trauma Bonding turns to real love. So great is her spirit that the Sheik begins to admire her, and trusts her with a gun to protect herself when she is out riding. He has never trusted a woman like this, and it shows the depth of his burgeoning feelings for her, feelings he does not yet recognize. And when Ahmed's rival Omar sends men to capture her, she fights the men and they have to knock her out. When she awakens in Omar's tent, she makes his servants obey her by sheer strength of will. When Omar murders a woman and dumps the body at her feet, she hides her terror by laughing and lighting a cigarette. And at the end, when Ahmed has finally realized that he loves her and that he has been a monster, a beast, a brute, a rapist and an all-around bad guy, he determines that the only thing he can do to make it up to her is to get the hell out of her life. Even here Diana's strength shows - she looks honestly at the life she will lead without Ahmed and realizes that she has nothing to live for. Like her father before her, she chooses death rather than a hollow, empty life without love. It is her attempted suicide that makes the Sheik realized the depth of her feelings, and that she truly will be happier with him then without him. In this final moment, Diana does in fact conquer her conqueror - he gives up his will of sending her away 'for her own good' and bows to her will to stay. In the follow up to this book, The Sons of the Sheik, we read that Ahmed, though he remains the implacable alpha male, and is full of self-loathing at what he has done to Diana and spends the rest of his life as her adoring mate.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book will mystify you and remain with you for days after you have finished it.You will actualy feel like you had a desert adventure of your own. You will want to read it over and over again.