The Sherlockian

The Sherlockian

by Graham Moore
3.9 131

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The Sherlockian 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 131 reviews.
TheCrowdedLeaf More than 1 year ago
Graham Moore's debut novel has all the ingredients to be a delicious mystery. it opens with Arthur Conan Doyle and his dear friend Bram Stoker as Arthur debates the pros and cons of killing off his famed character, Sherlock Holmes. Filled with a bitter hatred for his character because all of London believes Holmes to be real, and Arthur to be his literary agent, he sets about to destroy Sherlock and falls into a real life Holmes mystery along the way when murdered young women start appearing across his path. In the present, newly inducted Sherlockian Harold White celebrates his membership into the exclusive Holmes fan club, the Baker Street Irregulars. On the morning of the most important Irregular meeting in history, the presentation of the missing diary of Arthur Conan Doyle, Harold is pulled into his own Sherlock novel when the man who found the diary is murdered and the diary goes missing. Alternating between these two mysteries, The Sherlockian flows along quite nicely in the beginning. The plots are intriguing and, like a good mystery, keep you turning the page. But about a third of the way in a shift in the writing can be felt, a twist in the flow. No longer was I reading a mystery whose words carried the story. Suddenly I could feel the presence of the author, his hand in the way things were turning out, his decisions in making a clue appear here or there. It caused me to step back from the book and view it as a piece of the author's work, not a natural thing of its own. I know a good book because the writing works for itself, the characters carry me along, not the author. When I can sense an author at work, I am removed and the book feels clumsy and even contrived. Sadly, The Sherlockian became that for me. The writing was still decent, but Harold became an annoying, weak character instead of a charming Holmes enthusiast, and Arthur Conan Doyle became a silly, bumbling detective instead of the writer of great mysteries. Overall I became underwhelmed by The Sherlockian about half-way through. I persisted out of curiosity to see how Moore would solve the mystery of the diary, but in hindsight, I've already forgotten what kept me turning the page, and I only finished reading last night.
NovelChatter More than 1 year ago
The Sherlockian opens in 1893 during the "Great Hiatus," which to all non-Sherlockians is the period of time when Arthur Conan Doyle had "killed off" the legendary dearstalker-wearing sleuth Sherlock Holmes and the fans were deprived of any new Holmes mysteries. Conan Doyle has made quick work of the great Sherlock by sending him over the falls, and he was presumed dead for several years. Any soap opera watcher knows that unless the body is found, there's no dead character. And so it was with Holmes when Conan Doyle slyly resurrected Holmes to the thrill of his fans worldwide. We then fast forward to 2010 New York, to the bastion of all-things-literary, The Algonquin Hotel. It's there that the most ardent of Doyle/Sherlock fans, The Baker Street Irregulars, are holding their private induction meeting to welcome their new member Harold White. All of the members were excited with news Alex Cale had finally located the long lost diary of Conan Doyle. Alex had arrived at the Algonquin on "a dark and stormy night", announcing to Harold that he was being followed and feared for his life. A well founded fear, as it happens. In The Sherlockian, author Graham Moore sets two clearly defined stages, telling two stories, both using Sherlock Holmes as a main character. While in the past, Doyle is aided by his real life friend, Dracula author Bram Stoker, as they try to solve a mystery surrounding the deaths of young women by using the techniques that Conan Doyle employed while scripting Holmes. A very clever and fun aspect of the story that first time author Moore uses brilliantly. Moore easily slips us back and forth between the end of the 19th century with Conan Doyle and then forward into 2010 with Harold and his "Watson" freelance reporter, Sarah Lindsey as they search for the long lost Conan Doyle diary. Being a mystery lover, I enjoyed the plotting and twists that Moore brings to the story. The Sherlockian is a work of historical fiction, and many of the situations and happenings in the book are events in Conan Doyle's life. Moore writes an enjoyable book, encompassing the telling of two gripping tales within the single book. The Sherlockian is the kind of book that I read quickly, rapidly turning the page in anticipation, only to realize I had almost finished the book and slow down to enjoy the end. I enjoyed this so much I'd pay hard-earned money to buy and give as a gift. I look forward to what comes next from Mr. Moore. Source: I received this book from the publisher at my request and in no way did this affect my review.
Booklover87 More than 1 year ago
I love Sherlock Holmes stories and picked this up last week thinking it would be fun to read and I was not disappointed. It was very entertaining because of the parallel story lines of a modern day Sherlockian and Arthur Conan Doyle after he decided to kill Holmes. Anyone who's a fan of mysteries and/or Sherlock Holmes will enjoy this new novel from a promising new author.
Ronrose More than 1 year ago
The world's love affair with Sherlock Holmes and his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, continues unabated. With more motion pictures and television shows devoted to Holmes, we can only assume that even more readers will be drawn to the original stories as well as the myriad of offshoots penned by writers paying homage to the legend and his creator. The Sherlockian, by Graham Moore, is an excellent addition to the Holmes collection. Moore gives us a very detailed portrait of Arthur Conan Doyle at a crucial time in the writer's life. Doyle feels he is being overshadowed by his own creation. He kills off his hero, but is still daily faced with reminders of Holmes' presence. In order to prove his superiority, Doyle becomes involved in solving the mystery of a slain girl. As a counterpoint, Moore intersperses a storyline set in the present wherein a Sherlockian devotee, Harold, is totally involved in the legend and lore of Sherlock Holmes. He becomes involved in the search for a missing diary which Conan Doyle supposedly penned between the time he killed off Holmes and the detective's eventual resurrection. The past and present are artfully counterbalanced to present a blend of action and romance that takes the reader deep into Conan Doyle's life to delve into the last remaining mystery of a master of mystery. Provided for review by the well read folks at Twelve Books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read for fans of mystery books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is addictive, I had a hard time putting it down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's my first mystery other than the original Sherlock series, definitely lived up to the standards. I would recommend this for everyone other than a few curse words, so not for the kids. Very suspenseful!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Goes back and forth a bit but worth it
Serenity123 More than 1 year ago
I could not put this book down... i even took it to work and read it there while on my breaks... Graham Moore creates a story that will have you trying to figure out everything that happens just like Holmes does. Its a great story that leaves you one step behind the hero and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle! A must read for all sherlock holmes fans!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If youknow a Sherlock fan, i recommend this book!
Lisa Wilken More than 1 year ago
This book was fantastic. It had a great pace and scintillating imagery. It was not hard to follow, even if you have not read any Sherlock Holmes stories. If you had, you find yourself trying to deduce along with the characters and solve the mystery with them. The interesting format the author uses by alternating each chapter from the point of view of Arthur Conan Doyle to Harold, the protagonist, is entertaining and keeps you from being able to stop reading. The end of each chapter is cliffhanger enough that you simply must continue reading. You find yourself immersed and trying to make the same deductions and conclusions you would if you were reading a S.H. novel or short story. Of course, this is simply my opinion, but I can't wait to reread it, now with the omniscient perspective. ....all this and the author was only twenty eight. Wonderful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am about three-quarters of the way done with The Sherlockian, and so far, I absolutely love it! It was one of the first books I bought for my Nook, and I can't put my Nook down! It's absolutely amazing! The concept is so creative, and the characters capture you from the beginning. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves a good mystery, or just a good book in general!
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
What ever mystery hunter would love that is a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes would be to solve a mystery of their own! Well in fact that is just what newcomer, Harold White, discovers as he attends his first official meeting of the Backstreet Irregulars, a private membership of those individuals who have an deep interest in all things involving Sherlock Holmes. The holy grail of all the members is the elusive diary of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle which has been missing for years. Only when a member by the name of Alex Cale announces he has discovered it, does the mystery truly begin. When Alex is found murdered, Harold White takes it upon himself to solve the mystery much like his nemesis, Sherlock Holmes would have. In the novel, The Sherlockian by Graham Moore, the reader is immersed from the first page into two different time periods, one dealing with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle the famous author of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries and a modern day mystery involving solving the murder of Alex Cale who purportedly had the original diary of Mr. Doyle's in his possession. For those of you that love following clues, and unraveling the unknown mysteries in a great novel by fireside, this one is a must for you. I received this wonderful book compliments of Hachette Book Groups for my honest review and uncovered a 5 out of 5 stars! This book is available in hardcover, audio and eBook formats.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In the 2010 annual Baker Street Irregular convention, newby "Irregular" Harold investigates the murder of renowned Sherlock Holmes scholar Alex Cale. The homicide occurred just after Cale boasted he found the lost volume of Conan Doyle's diary. The valuable entry was not found in the hotel room where Cale was killed. In 1893, Arthur Conan Doyle is bone weary of Holmes as he has no life seemingly without the famous literary sleuth. However, he never anticipated the uproar and anger when he solved his dilemma at Reichenbach Falls. In 1900 he has a bigger concern to deal with since someone sent him a letter bomb perhaps because of what he did to his "alter-ego". He turns to his friend Bram Stoker, who understands what it means to write a novel with a character that takes on a life of its own, to help him ferret out who wants Doyle as dead as Holmes. This is a superb Sherlockian thriller with the focuses on why Doyle killed and later resurrected his hero. Readers see the same questions analyzed through the characters in the present day and over a century ago. The parallel subplots are rotated, which can be a bit overwhelming. The murder subplots though well conceived while enhancing the tale take a back seat to the overarching historiographical theme. Graham Moore proves modern day intelligent people unintended and unwittingly bring their imprint to Doyle and Holmes. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous 5 months ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fun book!
BeesKneesBookishKorner More than 1 year ago
It took me 15 days to read this book. It wasn’t bad, it just didn’t have a flow that kept me from putting the book down. Moore wrote this book from the perspective of Harold, a Sherlock enthusiast/scholar/fan/ and from Arthur Conan Doyle’s perspective; alternating chapters from 1900 to 2010. Just when I started getting into the story, the chapter would end and I would have to switch times and characters. Oftentimes, I would forget where the one time had left off and would have to go back two chapters to refresh my memory. Considering the story that Moore was trying to tell here, I can’t imagine another way that he could have written it and maybe other readers have an easier time staying with the flow of a book like this than I did. Harold’s story involved trying to solve the murder of a fellow Sherlockian and recover a missing volume of Conan Doyle’s diary. Harold is by no means a detective, but he figures that he would have as much of a chance as anyone else at solving the murder with all of his Holmes knowledge. Arthur Conan Doyle’s part of the story is Moore’s speculation as to what is in the missing diary. Since nobody knows what’s actually in the missing diary, Moore’s story is as good a guess as any. This book is almost a retelling of the events that actually occurred surrounding Conan Doyle’s diary and Moore does an excellent job of it. I considered dnf’ing this book a couple different times, mostly because I was frustrated with myself and not the book. However, considering how much I enjoyed Moore’s The Last Days of Night I was convinced that it would be worth it to finish the book, so I did, and it was. I liked the ending and Moore’s author’s notes made the entire journey worthwhile. I think that somebody with Harold’s enthusiasm for all things Sherlock Holmes would have enjoyed this book more than I did and they wouldn’t have struggled with it quite the same way that I did either. That being said, I would recommend this book to people who like to read books about books and authors, historical fiction, and those who imagine themselves to be sleuths.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One type of story sold and unless he wanted to go broke he had to keep on writing some managed by writing under several different pen names one english author had about ten a popular author might try another genre and actually do well with it under a new name. just common sense.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This would not have been a book I would have normally picked to read but was the monthly read for a book club. I was pleasantly surprised and actually really enjoyed the book. It was a very quick and easy read. I would recommend for someone looking for a good read.
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