The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

by Naomi Klein
4.1 42

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Overview

The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism by Naomi Klein

The bestselling author of No Logo shows how the global "free market" has exploited crises and shock for three decades, from Chile to Iraq

In her groundbreaking reporting over the past few years, Naomi Klein introduced the term "disaster capitalism." Whether covering Baghdad after the U.S. occupation, Sri Lanka in the wake of the tsunami, or New Orleans post-Katrina, she witnessed something remarkably similar. People still reeling from catastrophe were being hit again, this time with economic "shock treatment," losing their land and homes to rapid-fire corporate makeovers.

The Shock Doctrine retells the story of the most dominant ideology of our time, Milton Friedman's free market economic revolution. In contrast to the popular myth of this movement's peaceful global victory, Klein shows how it has exploited moments of shock and extreme violence in order to implement its economic policies in so many parts of the world from Latin America and Eastern Europe to South Africa, Russia, and Iraq.

At the core of disaster capitalism is the use of cataclysmic events to advance radical privatization combined with the privatization of the disaster response itself. Klein argues that by capitalizing on crises, created by nature or war, the disaster capitalism complex now exists as a booming new economy, and is the violent culmination of a radical economic project that has been incubating for fifty years.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781429919487
Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 04/01/2010
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 576
Sales rank: 99,991
File size: 788 KB

About the Author

Naomi Klein is the award-winning author of the acclaimed international bestseller No Logo, which The Literary Review of Canada named one of the hundred most important Canadian books ever published. She is also the author of the essay collection Fences and Windows. With Avi Lewis, she co-created the documentary film The Take, which was an Official Selection of the Venice Biennale and won the Best Documentary Jury Prize at the American Film Institute's Film Festival in Los Angeles. She is a contributing editor for Harper's, a reporter for Rolling Stone, and writes a regular, internationally syndicated column. She has won the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism. She is a former Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics and holds an honorary Doctor of Civil Laws from the University of King's College, Nova Scotia. Born in Montreal, she now lives in Toronto.


Naomi Klein is the award-winning author of the acclaimed international bestsellers No Logo and The Shock Doctrine, both of which have been translated into more than 25 languages with over a million copies in print. The Shock Doctrine was a New York Times Critics’ Pick of the year, and The Literary Review of Canada named No Logo one of the hundred most important Canadian books ever published. She is also the author of the essay collection Fences and Windows. With Avi Lewis, she co-created the documentary film The Take, which was an Official Selection of the Venice Biennale and won the Best Documentary Jury Prize at the American Film Institute’s Film Festival in Los Angeles.  She is a contributing editor for Harper’s, a reporter for Rolling Stone, and writes a regular, internationally syndicated column. She has won the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism. She is a former Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics and holds an honorary Doctor of Civil Laws from the University of King’s College, Nova Scotia. Born in Montreal, she now lives in Toronto.

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The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 42 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Should be required reading for anyone who is concerned about the USA and the monopolies that are now firmly in control of our government. The illusion of free choice is an illusion that must be disrupted. A truly free market should protect all but as we constantly see, only the rights and wishes of the 1% are protected. Reagan (with Friedman's help), and every president since, have sold out the American people to the highest bidders.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was really great and in debth with detail. When buying this book another book "Life After Foreclosure" by Dean Wegner came up and together I feel both books have taught me so much about the nation we live in.
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Every now and then a liberal economist will write about some evil of globalization, some manner in which Western financiers stole something of value from a poorer nation by imposing a depression on it, and will hedge against the obvious conclusion with "But they didn't mean to, it's just an unfortunate byproduct of their ideology." But she goes beyond making the accusation and provides tons of proof that the "they're evil" approach explains random, seemingly unrelated events better than the "they're stupid" explanation. Klein takes the reader through events in countries all over the globe, explaining how economic pain was used to drive through reforms that the countries themselves didn't want - reforms that the richer countries had often already rejected - in an attempt to get their hands on the long-term wealth of the country in question. Sure, you can still try to believe that all this looting, occurring for decades and performed by hundreds of people in disparate locations, happened just by chance, but that would be ignoring the most obvious explanation. The title comes from the strategy for changing Russia from a communist to a free market economy, which resulted in billions of dollars being taken out of Russia and put in Swiss bank accounts, a loss of 1/3 of GDP, and a massive increase in poverty. Even the IMF has admitted to mistakes in its advice to Russia, but if they're admitting to that much, how bad were things from the inside? It's a long book but you don't have to be familiar with economics or global 20th century history to get the point. In fact, its biggest strength is that its willing to explain everything for newcomers to these discussions.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the most important book of the 20th century. Klein's researchis impeccable, and though some of her conclusions aren't necessarily where I mighthave thought to go, it doesn't change the fact that she proves the overall thesis of the book. This is a horrifying look into the twisted results of glorifying greed, the people who benefir from it and the people qho ultimately pay for it. I am, of course, over simplifying things, but this is the kind of book that is changing the way people look at the world and waking them up fro ma long slumber.
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