Shooting War

Shooting War

by Anthony Lappe
4.0 2
ISBN-10:
0446581305
ISBN-13:
2900446581300
Pub. Date:
09/09/2008
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
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Overview

Shooting War

The global war on terror is raging out of control. The president is popping Prozac. And the #1 selling videogame in 2011 America is the terrorist-simulator Infidel Massacre: Los Angeles. On the streets of gentrified Brooklyn, videoblogger Jimmy Burns' latest anti-corporate rant is cut short by a terrorist bombing of a Starbucks...but his live feed isn't. When his dramatic footage is uploaded by Global News ("Your home for 24-hour terror coverage") and rebroadcast across the planet, the obscure blogger is transformed into an overnight media sensation. The next thing he knows he's on a Black Hawk helicopter inbound for Baghdad, working for the same mainstream media monster he once loathed. Burns soon finds that everyone from his ratings-ravenous network overlords to Special Ops troops with messianic complexes to a charismatic band of tech-savvy jihadists all want to make him their pawn.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900446581300
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
Publication date: 09/09/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 192
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

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Shooting War 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
nevermindjosh More than 1 year ago
This graphic novel takes many of the ideas and concepts surrounding the abundance of new media, blogs, podcasts, etc., and drops them in the middle of Iraq where they uncover a vast conspiracy. I don't want to ramble on too much, so I'll just say it's a nice commentary on the decreasing integrity and increasing corporate ownership in journalism, and how slackers hope to cash in and somehow still maintain their hip anti-consumerism stances. The problem is the weak story, the poor dialogue, and a barely believable, almost successful conspiracy. I liked the art and the graphics, and loved the concept, but over-all, the story just wasn't that great or well executed.