The Shop on Blossom Street (Blossom Street Series #1)

The Shop on Blossom Street (Blossom Street Series #1)

by Debbie Macomber

Paperback(First Time Trade)

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Overview

Four lives knit together...

There's a little yarn store in Seattle called A Good Yarn. It's owned by Lydia Hoffman, and it represents her dream of a new beginning, a life free from cancer. A life that offers a chance at love...

Lydia teaches knitting to beginners, and the first class is How to Make a Baby Blanket. Three women join. Jacqueline Donovan disapproves of the woman married to her only son, but knitting a baby blanket would be a gesture of reconciliation.

For Carol Girard, the baby blanket brings a message of hope as she and her husband make a final attempt to conceive.

And tough-looking Alix Townsend (that's Alix with an i) is learning to knit her blanket for a court-ordered community service project.

These four very different women, brought together by the age-old craft of knitting, make unexpected discoveries-about themselves and each other. Discoveries that lead to friendship and acceptance, to laughter and dreams. Discoveries only women can share...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780778315674
Publisher: MIRA Books
Publication date: 04/30/2013
Series: A Blossom Street Novel , #1
Edition description: First Time Trade
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 74,811
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Debbie Macomber, with more than 100 million copies of her books sold worldwide, is one of today's most popular authors. The #1 New York Times bestselling author is best known for her ability to create compelling characters and bring their stories to life in her books. Debbie is a regular resident on numerous bestseller lists, including the New York Times (70 times and counting), USA TODAY (currently 67 times) and Publishers Weekly (47 times). Visit her at www.DebbieMacomber.com.

Hometown:

Port Orchard, Washington

Date of Birth:

October 22, 1948

Place of Birth:

Yakima, Washington

Education:

Graduated from high school in 1966; attended community college

Read an Excerpt

"The yarn forms the stitches, the knitting forges the friendships, the craft links the generations."

—Karen Alfke, "Unpattern" designer and knitting instructor

LYDIA HOFFMAN

The first time I saw the empty store on Blossom Street I thought of my father. It reminded me so much of the bicycle shop he had when I was a kid. Even the large display windows, shaded by a colorful striped awning, were the same. Outside my dad's shop, there were flower boxes full of red blossoms—impatiens—that spilled over beneath the large windows. That was Mom's contribution: impatiens in the spring and summer, chrysanthemums in the fall and shiny green mistletoe at Christmas. I plan to have flowers, too.

Dad's business grew steadily and he moved into increasingly larger premises, but I always loved his first store best.

I must have astounded the rental agent who was showing me the property. She'd barely unlocked the front door when I announced, "I'll take it."

She turned to face me, her expression blank as if she wasn't sure she'd heard me correctly. "Wouldn't you like to see the place? You do realize there's a small apartment above the shop that comes with it, don't you?"

"Yes, you mentioned that earlier." The apartment worked perfectly for me. My cat, Whiskers, and I were in need of a home.

"You would like to see the place before you sign the papers, wouldn't you?" she persisted.

I smiled and nodded. But it wasn't really necessary; instinctively I knew this was the ideal location for my yarn shop. And for me.

The one drawback was that this Seattle neighborhood was undergoing extensive renovations and, because of the construction mess, Blossom Street was closed at one end, with only local traffic allowed. The brick building across the street, which had once been a three-story bank, was being transformed into high-end condos. Several other buildings, including an old warehouse, were also in the process of becoming condos. The architect had somehow managed to maintain the traditional feel of the original places, and that delighted me. Construction would continue for months, but it did mean that my rent was reasonable, at least for now.

I knew the first six months would be difficult. They are for any small business. The constant construction might create more obstacles than there otherwise would have been; nevertheless, I loved the space. It was everything I wanted.

Early Friday morning, a week after viewing the property, I signed my name, Lydia Hoffman, to the two-year lease. I was handed the keys and a copy of the rental agreement. I moved into my new home that very day as excited as I can remember being about anything. I felt as if I was just starting my life and in more ways than I care to count, I actually was.

I opened A Good Yarn on the last Tuesday in April. I felt a sense of pride and anticipation as I stood in the middle of my store, surveying the colors that surrounded me. I could only imagine what my sister would say when she learned I'd gone through with this. I hadn't asked her advice because I already knew what Margaret's response would be. She isn't—to put it mildly—the encouraging type.

I'd found a carpenter who'd built some cubicles for me, three rows of them, painted a pristine white. Most of the yarn had arrived on Friday and I'd spent the weekend sorting it by weight and color and arranging it neatly in the cubicles. I'd bought a secondhand cash register, refin-ished the counter and set up racks of knitting supplies. I was ready for business.

This should have been a happy moment for me but instead, I found myself struggling to hold back tears. Dad would've been so pleased if he could have seen what I'd done. He'd been my support and my source of strength, my guiding light. I was so shocked when he died.

You see, I'd always assumed I would die before my father.

Most people find talk of death unsettling, but I've lived with the threat of it for so long, it doesn't have that effect on me.The possibility of death has been my reality forthe last fourteen years, and I'm as comfortable talking about it as I am the weather.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

Macomber is an adept storyteller.... Many will be entertained by this well-paced story about four women finding happiness and fulfillment through their growing friendship." -Publishers Weekly

"Four women brought together by their interest in knitting makes for an interesting read by bestselling novelist Debbie Macomber. . . . The Shop on Blossom Street shows the author's understanding of the heart of a woman." -The Sunday Oklahoman

"Macomber is a master storyteller; any one of these characters could have been a stereotype in less talented hands. Instead, these women and their stories are completely absorbing." -RT Book Reviews

"Debbie Macomber tells women's stories in a way no one else does." -BookPage

Customer Reviews