The Shroud Codex

The Shroud Codex

by Jerome R. Corsi
3.7 14

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Overview

The Shroud Codex by Jerome R. Corsi

The priest. . . . Brought back to life on an operating room table after a horrific car crash, Father Paul Bartholomew is haunted by frightening visions—especially the moments when he seems to inhabit the body of Christ at Golgotha. The skeptics. . . . Dr. Stephen Castle, a New York City psychiatrist and renowned atheist, has built an international reputation for his book arguing that religion is a figment of human imagination. Professor Marco Gabrielli, an Italian religious researcher and chemist, has made a career of debunking supposed miracles, of explaining the unexplainable. The miracle. . . . For centuries, however, the Shroud of Turin has defied scientific explanation. Is this ancient remnant that bears such a vividly detailed pictorial representation truly the burial cloth that wrapped Christ after he was taken down from the cross? Or is it the biggest fraud ever perpetrated on the Christian community? As Father Bartholomew—newly returned to his parish, the venerable St. Joseph’s Church in upper Manhattan—celebrates Mass, blood starts running down his arm. The horrified congregation watches him collapse to the ground, his vestments soaked with the blood pouring from wounds on his wrists. The phenomenon is known as stigmata, when a person appears to manifest the wounds that Christ suffered upon the cross. But in Father Bartholomew’s case there is a mysterious added dimension: he has been transformed to resemble in almost every physical aspect the Christ-like figure represented on the Shroud of Turin. Worried that Bartholomew’s case could be proved a hoax, the Vatican employs Dr. Castle and Professor Gabrielli to investigate. But for the well-known psychiatrist and the experienced man of science both, Father Bartholomew presents the most perplexing challenge either has ever faced. Dr. Castle watches in person while the priest appears to writhe in agony, blood spurting from wounds identical to those portrayed on the famous shroud, and he wonders if he too can have been sucked into some kind of shared hallucination. Meanwhile, Professor Gabrielli—confident that he can reproduce the shroud by using materials and methods available in the Middle Ages—works frantically to prove that the shroud is a medieval forgery.

But when the priest’s uncanny resemblance to the crucified Christ on the Shroud prompts the two men to investigate the famous artifact itself, each is finally forced to face mysteries that cannot be explained by sheer reason alone. It will be the most unsettling—and eventually soul-wrenching—journey of discovery they have ever undertaken.

From Jerome R. Corsi, author of the #1 New York Times bestseller The Obama Nation, comes a magnificent, thought-provoking first novel. Grounded in the same kind of in-depth, all-encompassing research that has distinguished Corsi’s nonfiction, The Shroud Codex plumbs the farthest reaches of science and the human spirit.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781476788296
Publisher: Gallery Books
Publication date: 04/12/2014
Pages: 400
Product dimensions: 4.90(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

Dr. Jerome Corsi received a Ph.D. from Harvard University in political science in 1972. He is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller The Obama Nation: Leftist Politics and the Cult of Personality and the co-author of Unfit for Command: Swift Boat Veterans Speak Out Against John Kerry, which was also a #1 New York Times bestseller. He is a regular contributor to WorldNetDaily.com.

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Shroud Codex 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Grizzly21 More than 1 year ago
This was a great read. I enjoyed the storyline and house closely referenced the different stages of the Crucifixion. I would recommend this book to others to read.
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amadeus303 More than 1 year ago
I read this book over the course of 3 days. It was a fairly easy read, and although the author doesn't end his chapters on cliffhangers, the subject matter itself kept me interested enough to continue reading. I will leave plot summary to other reviewers. I have 4 primary criticisms of this book, and it is why I only give the work 3 stars: (1) The author CLEARLY needs an editor. He frequently overuses words - many times in the same passages - that the novel reads more like a rough draft than a finished manuscript. One of the most overused words was "appreciate"... as in Castle appreciated what Father Morelli said, or Castle appreciated what Archibishop Duncan felt, etc. (2) The author sometimes confused his own characters, which again underscores the sentiment that this novel needed some serious proofreading. For example, in one passage, Father Morelli was noted as bringing Father Morelli to a location. The author intended the passage to read as Father Morelli bringing Father Bartholomew to the location. (3) There is no climax. For the non-Christian/Catholic reader that may not grasp the deeper meaning of Christ's resurrection to believers, the novel's "highest" point of conflict is perhaps even anti-climatic. There is no suspense build-up; the sequence of events follow a very predicatable path... especially to one familiar with the passion and death of Christ. I hate to even draw a comparison to a Dan Brown novel because he is often guilty of the same pitfall. However, Mr. Brown does an adequate job of detailing WHY a set of events can significantly impact his characters. (4) The resolution of the novel was very weak. While I'll try to avoid any spoilers here, much of the resolution (if one can call it that) is diluted by the very weak character development. The reader never truly feels vested in the protagonist. Most of the descriptions of Dr. Castle come off as declarations, and seem very superficial. They don't really give any insight into why Castle feels the way he does. Instead, it seems like we, as readers, are simply told that the protagonist feels this way because that's the way a psychiatrist is supposed to feel. With that said, I realize that this novel is meant to entertain... and in that right, it does accomplish this satisfactorily. Anyone who has some interest in religious phenomena (or perhaps the paranormal) will find some value in Corsi's book. Reading some of the preliminary reviews here, I feel much of the "acclaim" has been given simply because of the pro-theist / Catholic undertones of the novel. Whether a reader shares the same set of beliefs with the author or not is irrelevant. As a stand-alone piece of literature, The Shroud Codex lacks substance. Thriller fans should look elsewhere.
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