The Sigh of Haruhi Suzumiya (Haruhi Suzumiya Series #2)

The Sigh of Haruhi Suzumiya (Haruhi Suzumiya Series #2)

by Nagaru Tanigawa

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Overview

It's the end of the world as we know it - or is it?

Gorgeous, confident, and demanding, Haruhi Suzumiya is the leader of the SOS Brigade, a club comprised of her high school's most extraordinary students. So when Haruhi is bored, it's up to the SOS Brigade do something about it. In this sequel to the clever and uniquely witty The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, the SOS Brigade goes along with Haruhi's scheme to make a movie for the school's upcoming festival. But when filming begins, strange things start to happen, and Haruhi-who has no idea she's a goddess with the ability to destroy the world-starts to show her devastating powers.

Could the end be near? Or is it just another day at high school? You never know when Haruhi is involved!

Join the frenzy and the fun with this second book in the phenomenal bestselling series that took the world by storm with over 4.5 million copies sold.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316038799
Publisher: Yen Press
Publication date: 10/07/2009
Series: Haruhi Suzumiya Series , #2
Pages: 208
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 15 - 17 Years

About the Author

Nagaru Tanigawa is a Japanese author best known for The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya for which he won the grand prize at the eighth annual Sneaker Awards.

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The Sigh of Haruhi Suzumiya 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like to know if u want members for ur clan i would gladly like join my names griffinstar or call me susakura if u like im hoping to join ur clan
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But the boks r good 2
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I must say that I really love this edition, if you want to collect Haruhi's books, I must recommend the hardcover first edition. The cover is the original one from Japanese version and the illustrations are the originals so it isa great collection itemfor Haruhi's fans. However, I must say that this is not Tanigawa's best work, still it is a good short novel, but it pales compared with the first or the fourth novel. Still it is a fun story and I recommend to get this book.
psylence More than 1 year ago
There are certainly aspects of this book that I really like. The characters remain as delightfully quirky and unique as ever. The philosophical and scientific discussions are well-written enough to be understood by the laymen, the opening scene is enjoyable, and I always seemed to get a kick out of the different songs Haruhi is observed humming as she leaves for the day. However, the general plot of the SOS Brigade making a movie while trying to covertly suppress Haruhi's world-altering powers failed to thrill me. In short, this book is little more than the sum of its individual parts. If you didn't like the first one, this one won't change your mind about the series.
Spoinks More than 1 year ago
From the sensational 'Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya' comes the second novel 'The Sigh of Haruhi Suzumiya.' The story is brilliant, having a fleshed out plot and interesting characters, even adding some great comedy. The writing is fantastic too, flawlessly describing the events happening throughout the story. I highly recommend this book.
keristars on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In the afterword to Sigh, Tanigawa says that he didn't expect to write a series based on his first novel, The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya. And yet, Melancholy was extremely popular, and the short story he'd been asked to write as a preview was also popular, and so along came Sigh. That Tanigawa didn't plan to make a continuation of the first novel shows a bit, though that might be because it's been a while since I read it.Sigh doesn't have quite the charm that Melancholy does, and none of the characters are as likable as before. The plot is a bit rough, especially in the middle. But it was still an enjoyable enough book.This second book takes place around October, six months after the events of the first book and a month or two after the events in the short stories in the third book. In Sigh, Haruhi has decided that she wants to make a movie as the SOS-Brigade's contribution to the school festival. So, naturally, that's what happens, because the other four members tend to go out of their way to do whatever Haruhi wants. Haruhi here has turned into someone who doesn't seem to have any consideration for others. She treats Asahina, Nagato, Koizumi, and narrator Kyon as though they're living dolls for her to control - especially poor Asahina. At least she seems to have some respect for Kyon and lets him argue with her (which occasionally will change her mind). It's a bit bewildering why Kyon continues to do as she orders, but then he claims that he's protecting Asahina from Haruhi (he does a poor job of it).Asahina in this book is a cry-baby who won't stand up for herself; Nagato is more silent and statue-like than ever (though her traipsing around in witch's hat and black cape displays some element of humor, perhaps); and Koizumi just tries to do the least amount of work possible (which means foisting everything on Kyon). Kyon is whiny the whole time, about how Haruhi is bullying Asahina, how Haruhi won't let him rest, how Koizumi and Nagato aren't helpful at all, yet somehow I got the impression that he was actually having fun, except for his complaining.There were some rather interesting things that were revealed in the book: the three factions that Asahina, Nagato, and Koizumi represent each dissed the others to Kyon, and Koizumi said a few things that made himself sound less than trustworthy - it will be interesting to see how his role in the story develops and whether he becomes less of an exposition fountain (which Kyon even comments on in this book). Also, ignoring Kyon's whining, Haruhi's actions are interesting to watch, as you see her try to figure out what to do with friends (she's never had friends before), and as she slowly starts to realize that she needs to be considerate of them (though even at the end of the book, she doesn't seem to have fully understood the idea).So Sigh wasn't really as good as Melancholy, but it was enjoyable enough to read, despite the frustrating characters, especially considering its short length. At about 200 pages with illustrations and a largish typeface, it's more or less novella length and reads quickly.
timothyl33 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As fun as Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya was, The Sigh of Harushi Suzumiya seems to fall short of the feeling of fun and excitement that was prevalent in the first book. In some ways that's not surprising since (from my understanding), Tanigawa never originally anticipated in creating a sequel, and this book in some ways feels a bit light in content and plump in filler. After all, how can one top a (potentially) world ending cataclysmic event that occurred in Melancholy?Compared to that, the 'crisis' that is prevalent throughout this book seems somewhat anti-climactic and in some ways petty. For the most part, this book is basically about the ego of Haruhi. Although it was present in the previous book, it was only visible in palatable doses, while here, we're treated to the whole enchilada. In addition, about five percent of the book is of Koizumi's (for better lack of word) technobabble, as he talks one theory of 'reality vs fiction' after another.Frustratingly, most of this would have been bearable if not for the odd translation decisions made by the translator throughout this book. For a book that's set in Japan, most of the cultural references were replaced with an American equivalent. While that is certainly understandable to give the non-Japanese speaking reader a certain context to understand, it leaves me somewhat puzzled as to why then, certain terms themselves are left untranslated? Unless, one is familiar with Japanese or has a dictionary handy, I doubt anybody would know what 'hikkikomori' or 'tokusatsu' means. Personally, I'd have been find if the translator left the name of a Japanese band in the script, if it meant translating the rest into English. At least with the bands, I would still understand the context.Overall, it's a decent book, but mainly for fans of the series who would be reading this just to barrel through to the next book in the series.
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Yay
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