ISBN-10:
0195182472
ISBN-13:
9780195182477
Pub. Date:
09/01/2005
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board of Education and the Unfulfilled Hopes for Racial Reform

Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board of Education and the Unfulfilled Hopes for Racial Reform

by Derrick Bell

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780195182477
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 09/01/2005
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 506,040
Product dimensions: 8.80(w) x 5.60(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Derrick Bell is Visiting Professor of Law at New York University Law School. As an NAACP Legal Defense Fund lawyer, he handled and supervised hundreds of school desegregation cases during the 1960s. He is the author of several books, including And We Are Not Saved. He lives in New York City.

Hometown:

New York, New York

Date of Birth:

November 6, 1930

Place of Birth:

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Education:

A.B., Duquesne University, 1952; L.L.B., University of Pittsburgh Law School, 1957

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsix
Introduction1
1.Plessy's Long Shadow11
2.Brown's Half Light14
3.Brown Reconceived: An Alternative Scenario20
4.The Racial-Sacrifice Covenants29
5.The Interest-Convergence Covenants49
6.Brown as an Anticommunist Decision59
7.The Role of Fortuity in Racial Policy-Making69
8.Racism's Economic Foundation77
9.School Litigation in the Nineteenth Century87
10.The School Desegregation Era94
11.The End of the Brown Era114
12.Brown as Landmark: An Assessment130
13.Affirmative Action and Racial Fortuity in Action138
14.Searching for Effective Schools in the Post-Brown Era160
15.Moving Beyond Racial Fortuity180
Conclusion194
Notes203
Index223

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Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board of Education and the Unfulfilled Hopes for Racial Reform 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book as my choice for an optional reading for a college class 'Philosophy of Law'. I would highly recommend it because it leaves you thinking about the history and progression of civil rights in our country. His views are out of the norm but you have to ask yourself who's norm?He poses some leading questions about racial equality and whether we could or should do more in the effort to end discrimination and prejudice.