Simple Fare: Fall and Winter

Simple Fare: Fall and Winter

by Karen Mordechai

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Overview

Simple Fare: Fall and Winter by Karen Mordechai


The second book in the seasonal cooking series by Karen Mordechai of Sunday Suppers, Simple Fare: Fall and Winter is a richly illustrated resource, focused on market-driven cooking. It consists of 65 elegant, streamlined recipes for classic dishes, including Roasted Carrots over Smoked Ricotta Toast; Turkish Poached Eggs and Yogurt; Black Rice Bowl with Hummus, Shishito Peppers, and Buttermilk Meyer Lemon Dressing; Braised Beef Ribs and Beetroot; and more. Detailed instructions for preparing alternative flavor profiles are included for most recipes, allowing readers to easily adapt based on the ingredients at hand. Accented by unforgettable photography that showcases Mordechai’s minimalist style, Simple Fare is an oversize, distinc­tively designed kitchen essential.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781419726651
Publisher: ABRAMS
Publication date: 09/19/2017
Pages: 192
Sales rank: 1,186,207
Product dimensions: 9.70(w) x 12.90(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author


Karen Mordechai is the founder of Sunday Suppers, a Brooklyn-based cooking series and blog, and the kitchen product line ILA. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Food & Wine, Saveur, Elle, Martha Stewart Living, and more. She is the author of Simple Fare: Spring and Summer and Sunday Suppers.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

Essentials

This season is about slowing down and imparting strong and complex flavors into our cooking. Ahead, you will find the building blocks for the season, including oils, sauces, and such to keep in your larder. These will become useful tools to have on hand. Use them as called for, but also take liberty to be playful and use them in an unexpected manner.

Tomato Confit

Makes about 1 quart (960 ml)

Preserving end-of-summer tomatoes in a slow-roasted confit extends the tomato's life-span just a bit longer, adding an element of umami and sweetness to toasts, pastas, risottos, etc. Make a large batch at summer's end and use it on absolutely anything.

2 pounds (910 g) vine-ripened tomatoes
Preheat the oven to 350°F (190°C).

Remove the tomatoes from the vine and halve them crosswise. Pour the olive oil into a baking dish just large enough to fit all the tomato halves snugly, making sure it coats the entire bottom of the dish and adding more if needed. Sprinkle the salt and black pepper evenly over the olive oil and add the thyme sprigs and bay leaves.

Arrange the tomato halves over the olive oil and herbs, cut sides down. They should fit without much space in between. Tuck the garlic between the tomatoes and sprinkle the sugar over the top.

Bake until the tomatoes are soft and have released their juices, about 1 hour. Remove from the oven and remove and discard the thyme sprigs and bay leaves. Let the confit cool before using or storing.

Storage – Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Garlic Confit

Makes 1 quart (960 ml)

Many of our dishes have an aromatic foundation, consisting of herbs and garlic as the building blocks of flavor. This garlic confit takes a bit of preparation, but it will keep in your refrigerator for weeks and will become an invaluable daily tool. It can be used in place of garlic in any recipe and adds smoky, roasted notes for a bit more complexity. We also love cooking with the garlic oil itself, and using it on salads, toasts, and pastas.

1 lemon
Preheat the oven to 250ºF (120ºC).

Using a vegetable peeler, remove all the yellow peel from the lemon, avoiding the bitter white pith. Drop the peels into a medium ovenproof saucepan and add the garlic and thyme. Pour the olive oil over to cover, adding more as needed to fully submerge the garlic. Cover and bake until the garlic cloves are golden and tender, about 2 hours.

Remove from the oven, uncover, and let cool. Transfer the garlic and oil to a sealed container and refrigerate until ready to use.

Storage – Refrigerate in a sealed container for up to 2 to 3 weeks.

Everything Oil

Makes 3 cups (720 ml)

As named, this oil is everything. It adds a roasted depth of flavor, garlic, and herbs to any dish — and is a great tool to have on hand.

3 lemons
Preheat the oven to 250°F (120°C).

Using a vegetable peeler, remove all the yellow peel from the lemons, avoiding the bitter white pith. Drop the peels into a small ovenproof saucepan or baking dish and add the garlic, chile (if using), bay leaves, and thyme. Pour the olive oil over, making sure all the garlic, chile, and herbs are fully submerged. Cover and bake until the garlic is softened and the oil is infused and fragrant, 1 to 1½ hours.

Remove from the oven, uncover, and allow the oil to cool completely. Transfer the oil and solids to a sealed container to store.

Storage – Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

Black Garlic Dressing

Makes about ¼ cup (60 ml)

This dressing adds a smoky, earthy element to many of our wintery salads and plates. It is equally delicious served with bread for dipping.

2 Black Garlic cloves (page 44)
Place the garlic and vinegar in a small bowl. Use a fork to mash the cloves into a paste and stir to incorporate with the vinegar. Add the olive oil in a slow and steady stream, while whisking, until well combined. Season with flaky salt to taste.

Smoked Yogurt

Makes 1 cup (240 ml)

This relatively new addition to our repertoire is a huge source of excitement for us. The discovery that a small home smoker can add a distinct and beautiful smokiness to our cooking has been revelatory. This recipe explains how to smoke yogurt, which is a base we use often in our cooking. The same process can be applied to crème fraîche, Mascarpone, and labneh. Try it — you just might do a little dance.

Hickory wood chips
Mound the hickory wood chips in the bottom of a stovetop smoker according to the manufacturer's instructions (ours calls for 1½ tablespoons chips).

Place the drip tray and smoking rack over the top. Heat the smoker over medium-high heat until the chips start really smoking, about 2 minutes.

While the smoker heats, use a toothpick to poke small holes in the bottom of a ramekin-size aluminum container. Alternatively, you can fashion your own container from a doubled-up piece of aluminum foil and poke holes in the bottom. Dollop the yogurt into the container.

Once the chips are smoking, place the container of yogurt on top of the smoking rack and close the lid to the smoker. Remove from the heat and cold smoke the yogurt for 1 hour, keeping the lid closed the whole time. (If your lid doesn't fit snugly, place something heavy, like a cast-iron skillet, on top to keep it completely sealed). After 1 hour, remove the yogurt (it will be barely colored on top), transfer to a bowl, and stir with a spoon so that the smoky flavor is evenly distributed. Serve immediately or transfer to an airtight container to store.

Storage – Refrigerate for 3 to 4 days.

Pickled Vegetables beet + turmeric

Makes 2 cups pickles

These bright pickles are beautiful, crunchy, and quite tart — as we like them. We add them to sandwiches, bowls, soups, and even breakfast. We use a variety of vegetables and even quail eggs, but feel free to explore and add your favorites. Ideas may include baby turnips, baby carrots, shallots, baby beets, radishes, etc.

Beet

2 cups assorted items to be pickled, such as baby carrots,
Halve any larger baby carrots, turnips, and beets lengthwise. Thinly slice the shallots and radishes and peel the quail eggs, if using. Put in a quartsize (960-ml) jar and set aside.

In a saucepan, combine the vinegar, sugar, salt, mustard seeds, bay leaf, beet, and 1 cup (240 ml) water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce the heat to maintain a simmer, and cook for 20 minutes to meld the flavors.

Remove from the heat and let the brine cool completely.

Pour the cooled brine over the items to be pickled and seal the jar. Transfer to the refrigerator and allow to pickle for at least 8 hours before serving.

Storage – Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

Turmeric

2 cups assorted items to be pickled, such as baby carrots, baby turnips,
Halve any larger baby carrots, turnips, and beets lengthwise. Thinly slice the shallots and radishes and peel the quail eggs, if using. Put in a quart-size (960-ml) jar and set aside.

In a saucepan, combine the vinegar, sugar, salt, mustard seeds, bay leaf, turmeric root, and 1 cup (240 ml) water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce the heat to maintain a simmer, and cook for 20 minutes to meld the flavors. Remove from the heat and let cool completely.

Pour the cooled brine over the items to be pickled and seal the jar. Transfer to the refrigerator and allow to pickle for at least 8 hours before serving.

Storage – Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

Chermoula

Makes about 2¼ cups (540 ml)

With a bit of brightness, this herb concentration is a more Eastern take on a typical salsa verde. We keep it close by to add freshness to otherwise muted meals. It goes well with fish, poultry, and vegetables. You can also mix it into salads, dressings, aiolis, and butters.

1 bunch cilantro
In a food processor, combine the herbs, vinegar, lime zest and juice, and salt. Pulse to combine. With the motor running, add the olive oil in a slow and steady stream until completely incorporated.

Transfer the chermoula to a container, press plastic wrap directly onto the surface to keep it from browning, and refrigerate.

Storage – Refrigerate for 3 to 4 days.

Dukkah

Makes about 1 cup (115 g)

This combination of seeds and spices is a perfect mix of earth-like flavors and textures. Use this on toast, yogurts, and salads.

½ cup (60 g) hazelnuts, finely chopped
In a small bowl, combine all the ingredients until thoroughly mixed.

Storage – Store in a sealed container at room temperature for 3 to 6 months.

Roasted Beef Broth

Makes about 3 quarts (2.8 L)

This nourishing and beautiful bone broth is roasted and then cooked slowly, bringing out the nutrients and flavors of the bones, marrow, and aromatics. Use this as a base for soups and stews, or for cooking grains. This broth can also be seasoned and sipped on its own to nourish and build immunity in the winter months. Note the beautiful, off-the-bone braised short rib you will be left with after all your hard work and patience. And if you decide to take this to the next level, see page 85.

2½ pounds (1.2 kg) bone-in short ribs
Preheat the oven to 450°F (230°C).

In a large roasting pan, toss the short ribs and knuckle bones with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil until coated and arrange in a single layer. Roast, turning once halfway through, for 25 minutes. Add the carrots, onions, leek, and garlic to the pan with the meat and drizzle the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil over top. Return the pan to the oven and roast, tossing the vegetables once halfway through, until starting to brown, 15 to 20 minutes. Add the tomato paste to the pan and toss with the meat and vegetables. Roast for a final 3 to 5 minutes and then remove the pan from the oven.

Using tongs, transfer the roasted bones and vegetables to a large stockpot. Carefully pour 1 quart (960 ml) water into the empty roasting pan and use a wooden spoon to scrape up all the browned bits from the bottom. Pour the water and browned bits into the pot over the meat and vegetables. Pour an additional 1 gallon (3.8 L) water into the pot so that everything is submerged. On a square piece of cheesecloth, place the thyme, parsley, bay leaves, and peppercorns. Gather the edges of the cheesecloth together to form a bundle and tie the top with kitchen twine to close. Add the bundle to the pot.

Heat until just boiling, then immediately reduce the heat to low. Cook at a very gentle simmer for 4 to 6 hours, occasionally skimming any foam or fat from the surface. When finished, the broth will be rich in color and flavor. The longer the broth simmers, the more flavorful and enriched it will be.

Remove the pot from the heat and use tongs to remove and discard the large bones and bundle of herbs. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve and reserve the short rib meat for the beef bowl on pages 84 – 85. If you find the broth to be overly fatty, you can strain it a second time through a cheesecloth to catch any excess fat. Allow to cool completely and transfer to airtight containers to store. Remove any fat that rises to the top before using.

Storage – Refrigerate for 3 to 4 days or freeze for up to 1 year.

Chicken Stock

Makes about 2 quarts (2 L)

This is the quintessential chicken stock to make as the seasons shift. Cooked slowly, the aromatics impart a simple fragrant flavor to the stock. Be sure to season it upon usage or serving. We use this in our soups and dishes to add flavor and aroma.

1 (3- to 4-pound/1.4- to 1.8-kg) whole chicken, quartered
Put all the ingredients in a large stockpot and add enough water to completely cover the ingredients, about 1 gallon (3.8 L). Heat until just boiling, then immediately reduce the heat to low. Cook at a very gentle simmer for 2 hours, occasionally skimming any foam or fat from the surface.

Carefully remove the chicken and reserve the poached meat for another use. Strain the stock through a fine-mesh sieve and allow to cool completely; discard the solids. Transfer the stock to airtight containers to store.

Storage – Refrigerate for 3 to 4 days or freeze for up to 1 year.

Guide to Cooking Legumes + Grains

Below is a guide to how we cook our basic legumes and grains. We like to keep these on hand in our refrigerator for easy meal assembly.

Legume / grain to water
black lentils
chickpeas
Forbidden Rice
jasmine / basmati rice
short-grain brown rice
farro
quinoa
black lentils

In a medium saucepan, combine the lentils and water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Once tender but still al dente, drain the lentils and transfer to a bowl to cool.

chickpeas

Place the dried chickpeas in a large bowl and cover with 6 cups (1.4 L) water. Set aside to soak overnight.

Drain the soaked chickpeas and rinse them under cold water. Place the chickpeas in a large stockpot and cover with the water for cooking; add 1 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 1 to 1½ hours, until the chickpeas are cooked to your liking. Drain.

grains

In a medium saucepan, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium-low heat. Add the grain of your choice and toast in the saucepan until lightly golden and fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the water (or stock) and a pinch of salt and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook for the time indicated by the chart. Remove from the heat, leave covered for 5 minutes, then fluff the grains before serving or using in a recipe. If you are making farro, simply drain any excess water before serving. If you are cooking more than 1 cup of a grain, use a ratio of 1 cup grain to 1 tablespoon olive oil to toast it.

(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Simple Fare Fall/Winter"
by .
Copyright © 2017 Karen Mordechai.
Excerpted by permission of Abrams Books.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Seasonality, 11,
Introduction, 12,
Usage /Market Variations, 17,
Essentials, 20,
Fermented + Grounding, 38,
Breakfast, 48,
Toasts, 66,
Bowls, 80,
Plates, 90,
Burnt, 100,
Mains, 118,
Snacks, 142,
Desserts, 156,
Cook's Notes, 173,
Basic Ingredients, 184,
Sources, 186,
Index, 187,
Acknowledgments, 192,

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