A Singular Woman: The Untold Story of Barack Obama's Mother

A Singular Woman: The Untold Story of Barack Obama's Mother

by Janny Scott
3.8 54

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A Singular Woman: The Untold Story of Barack Obama's Mother 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 54 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
if you are are not an admirer of the president you will get nothing from this book. but if you are it is a must read. she was an amazing woman and i am glad for the insight on her compassionate socially conscious life. what an exceptional role model for her children.
Jean Richardson More than 1 year ago
I do not understand why, but I am suprised at the number of reviews that profess hate for Ms Dunham because they dislike her son. On another site, one person stated that Republicans should have endorsed abortion in her case. We are not required to agree with the President, but these remarks about his mother are beneath comtempt. I doubt that they have the decency to be ashamed of their actions that prove that racism is alive in America.
GeGee More than 1 year ago
An interesting look into Barack Obama's Mother and some insight into his up bringing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
STanley Ann Dunhanm was a woman before her time. Her influence on her son and daughter was immense. But not only is she an interesting woman but the extended family of her parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts are interesting. She was an admirable woman and should be admired by women of today. This book is a must for people who like the president and admire him. Even if you don't like him, this book will enlighten you as to the impact she had on Mr. Obama's intellect and his approach to the world. When I read at the end of the book of how she died, I actually had tears. Her son and daughter lost a great mother. The academia lost a great intellect and the poor lost an advocate. It is sad to think that her grandchildren would not know her.
Meshugenah More than 1 year ago
Ms. Dunham led a life ahead of her time, and she did it with integrity and humor and love. Unfortunately, Janny Scott has written in such a dry, old, uninteresting style that I felt I was reading her a collection of the author's expanded notes, not yet formed into a book that reflected the life it was reporting. Interesting subject. Poor writing. Poor editing. Let's hope someone else comes along and does a better job.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Regardess of ones political affiliation or opinion of our current President, this well-researched book illuminates a person who was much more than "the white woman from Kansas". In many ways the tale of her family and life reflect the archetypal American story. Her willingness to reach beyond boundaries is shown as evolving -- not in opposition to, but in continuation of, the values, beliefs and dreams of her forbearers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have mixed reviews about this book. Didn't take full responsibility for raising her son, she became a mother of two children, yet she continued to live her life as she wanted to live it. In spite of all this her children turned out to be intellegent, highly educated, caring individuals. Look at her son. One of the greatest presidents of all time. I am glad the grandmother lived to see her grandson run for president, she must have been so proud.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As someone raised in Indonesia, I found this book very interesting and evoked many good memories of life in the Spice Islands. Janny Scott did a great job of interviewing family, friends and colleagues of Ann Duhnam.
Terry Vaught More than 1 year ago
Really an interesting read. I had trouble putting this book down. It was really a glimpse into another time and several other cultures.
catwak More than 1 year ago
I liked this, but somewhere in the middle, Ann the person was lost in the discussion of international development and microfinance, which was itself informative & new to me. I was intrigued by the ways in which the lives of Ann's parents were recapitulated in her own experience. The photographs were especially good. I'll also be permanently envious of a woman who never had to wear pantyhose until she was past 50!
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Zislaw More than 1 year ago
The can be boring at times, but that has more to do with the subject than the author, who was a very self-centered parent with her som. She raised her daughter, but not her son whom she handed off to her parents so she could pursue her "career" far away. It is a wonder that he did not become a drug dealer.
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