Six Weeks to Yehidah

Six Weeks to Yehidah

by Melissa Studdard

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Overview

Move over, C.S. Lewis; Melissa Studdard is here!
Annalise of the Verdant Hills is one of the most delightful protagonists to skip through the pages of literature since Dorothy landed in Oz.
Join Annalise and her two walking, talking wondersheep as they travel to ever more outlandish places and meet outrageous and enlightening folk on their journey to discover interconnectedness in a seemingly disconnected world.
Discover with them how just one person can be the start of the change we all strive for.
A book for all ages, for all time: wonderful, wacky, and bursting with truth!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780984651702
Publisher: All Things That Matter Press
Publication date: 08/28/2011
Pages: 172
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.40(d)

About the Author

Melissa Studdard is a professor, a book reviewer at-large, a contributing editor, as well as the host of a radio interview program. Her writings have appeared in dozens of magazines and journals.
She currently lives in Texas with her daughter and their four cats.
For more information, please visit www.melissastuddard.com, or www.sixweekstoyehidah.com.

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Six Weeks to Yehidah 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
lilcrickit on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Annalise is such a witty, imaginative and creative character. It was such an experience seeing the world through the eyes of a child. I admit it took me a moment to truly feel what the book was about but once I did, boy did I have clarity. This story makes you think about yourself and really evaluate who you are or better yet who you think you are. How many times do you find yourself hindering your own greatness. The story is meaningful and easy to relate to. Hagski, the crazy lady that shows up every time Annalise is about to do something, was pretty funny and when I found out what she represents, I had an Oh! moment. The narrative and plot flowed fairly well. The setting was believable and easy to visualize as Annalise went throughout her journey with her two walking and talking sheep, Mabel and Mimi. Overall, this is a very encouraging and intriguing for any age. Take a chance and read this work, filtering out any negative or distracting thoughts and really assess the message. Close out all the chaos and listen to the sound within.
MissMajicMarker on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Six weeks to Yehidah is a quick and easy read with a good message. When I first began to read this book I felt that other than for a few larger words I was reading a children's book, but once I got towards to the end I realized that was part of the beauty of it. After all, great morals are taught to us through stories we hear and read as children. I would recommend this book to anyone willing to get in touch with their inner child and let the story unfold itself in front of you. This book is not for those who live for the fast paced cliff hangers, but rather for lovers of bedtime stories, fairy tales, and people who can still enjoy the occasional Disney movie.On a side note I believe you could share this book with your child but I highly recommend you read it first.
Ani36ol on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a great novel for a debut author. I know it is listed as a Young Adult novel but I found it more along the lines of the younger side of that genre. It is a gently written story about 10 year old Annalise and her coming to realize how connected to nature we are in this amazing world. I loved the concept, filled with lots of fun characters with very few scary parts so not too many nightmares! I think this would be great if written on an even younger level, teaching younger kids our connection to nature, so easily forgotten in this day and age. Would you like to give it a try, Ms. Studdard?!
Rajapi on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Six Weeks To Yehidah weaves a spellbinding tale rich with imagistic prose and glittering landscapes. Told through the eyes of the 8 year old Annalis, the reader travels through clouds to magical lands and down into the mythical shimmering underwater city. Along the way, we meet a slew of compelling and relatable characters, charming, effervescent, frustrating and delightfully annoying. Melissa Studdard intersperses elements of music, magic, myth, native indian iconography and mystery that leaves the reader yearning for a sequel. Although, this is a children's book, like Harry Potter adults will be equally mesmerized by the trials and travails of the cheeky and courageous Annalise.
gaele More than 1 year ago
AudioBook Review: Overall:  Stars: 4 Narration:  4 Story:  4 A curious mix of children’s fantasy stories, Alice in Wonderland, Chronicles of Narnia and The Wizard of Oz, Melissa Studdard has crafted a lovely story perfect for middle-grade readers (or in this case, listeners).   Annalise is 11 and a dreamer, she loves to sing to the clouds and imagine herself in the stories her mother reads to her.  Despite her very  tender age, Annalise is grappling with the questions we all have: why are we here and what is our purpose.  And she explores the  question and gleans answers in the company of her two sheep friends, Mimi and Mabel.  Full of lessons and learning all brought gently to the forefront in a wild mix of characters and lovely prose that often is mixed with rhyme and song, Annalise is learning and exploring those parts of life that lie deep within, and aren’t always visible.  Heavily laden with lessons  that are intrinsic components of the thoughtful life; touching on themes that range from self-determination, choice, love, family and the circular nature of life and the interconnectedness of all beings.  While the concepts are deep and still can confuse and confound adults, Studdard presents the building blocks of initial thought with grace and clever imagery that will enchant younger readers as they travel along Annalise’s journey.  Narration in this story is provided by Karen Krause who deftly manages to add nuanced inflections, subtle tone and pacing changes and a smile in much of her delivery that makes the listen intriguing and entertaining. I love her voice and clear delivery, not too fast or slow with moments taken to just wonder at the lovely word pictures that Studdard has created.  Unlike any other stories I have reviewed, this story is fun and intriguing while carrying what is ultimately a life-altering decision at the end:  Annalise is a wonderfully developed character with a thoughtful and imaginative interior life, never losing that wonder and curiosity of a  child even as many of her reflections and conclusions are solidly old soul.   This book stays with you for the sheer beauty of the writing and world, and the messages within, giving both children and adults an  experience that leaves them richer for the listen.  I received an AudioBook copy of the title from the narrator for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. 
TurningThePagesBlog More than 1 year ago
This book took me completely by surprise. In fact even though I just finished this book a few hours ago I think I'm going to have to go back and re-read it because there were so many elements at work in the novel. I know one thing though that while this book is classified as a young adult novel and centers around a 10 year old little girl I think that the book could easily work as an adult novel regardless of the 10 year old heroine Annalise. In her novel Six Weeks to Yehidah Melissa Studdard created a wonderful novel in which Annalise learns, grows and explores and engages in in miraculous ways. While the novel is short at only 170 pages long it felt like a much longer novel because of all the things I got to experience along side Annalise as she herself grows as a person. For me I found that Annalise was just the sweetest character I've "met" in a long time and I couldn't help love her Melissa's story telling ability is amazing. I loved the world she created and her way of describing what was happening in the story was extremely well done and while I was reading it was as though the book itself was coming alive. Over all this was a great YA read that is written simply enough for younger readers to grasp but not so much that the older reader grows bored. I do have to warn you though that the book has a strong spiritual theme so if that isn't your cup of tea I would pass on this one. However, if you don't mind it I highly suggest getting your hands on a copy. I know my review is short but trust me on this, it's so worth the read. *I received a free copy in exchange for my free and honest review. I was not compensated in any way and all thoughts and opinions expressed therein are my own.
MarissaA More than 1 year ago
This story was an absolute delight. Annalise is a young heroine that, in ways, is independent as she goes on this unbelievable journey that no would believe, and it's quite a journey! Decisions can be hard to make and here the heroine has a big one, and that is a relatable aspect that can definitely connect with readers. What I really liked about this story, was the writing. Studdard is very descriptive, especially with settings, as at times, you will feel like you are with the characters. This is just a unique story with great pure creativity and I hope you check it out!
StephWard More than 1 year ago
'Six Weeks to Yehidah' is an unique young adult fantasy novel that follows a young girl named Annalise on her many adventures and travels throughout time and space. Along the way, she learns several valuable life lessons and also learns to be true to herself. The novel has a really interesting concept and the storyline is full of practical lessons that reader's of all ages can benefit from. Annalise is a fun and quirky main character, one that is very easy to identify with. I found this novel to be uplifting and fresh, and I think it's a wonderful coming of age story that is different from the other books in it's genre. Disclosure: I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
Disincentive More than 1 year ago
Six weeks to Yedihah is one of those books that should be considered as adult, not middle grade. I think if I read it few years earlier, I wouldn’t understand it. This book is supposed to make you think and… It does, in a funny way. Annalise is a lovely heroine. One day, she finds herself in another word, world full of adventures and questions that have to be answered. I easily became a friend of her as she grew – not in psychical way, mental one. I felt magic, I cried a lot. I thought that all her adventures were just a dream but scene when she comes back to the hospital and sees herself in coma, with her mother crying near to her bed was simply heart touching. It’s not a simple children story. Somehow writing is easy to understand and not too complicated but it’s excellent! I loved all the descriptions and songs. Six weeks to Yedihah reminded me a little about book I read long time ago, The Adventures of Jonathan Gullible: A Free Market Odyssey by Ken Schoolland. Both books are about travels. They are about different topics but they give you similar feeling. I recommend it for everyone with a child… If you read it by yourself first. You’ll love it.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Sylvia H. for Readers Favorite In the book "Six Weeks to Yehidah" by Melissa Studdard, ten year old Annalise of Verdant Hills imagines that she has fallen asleep under a tree while talking and singing to a pair of sheep. She then dreams that she is in a new land over the clouds where even the animals can speak and think for themselves. In reality, Annalise was swept away by flood waters during a violent storm in her home town. During her comatose state in the hospital, Annalise is taken on a journey of her imagination, her mind and of her soul. And while in the company of her two talking sheep who walk on their hind legs and represent her totems, Annalise discovers her true Yehidah(awareness)and is therefore guided to the path of her awakening. Mellisa Studdard's "Six Weeks to Yehidah" was a mind blowing, imaginative journey and a soul awakening wonderful read. It is a book that older children, young adults and the young at heart and of the soul will absolutely devour and enjoy. In each chapter of Melissa's book, she has written valuable learning lessons that are entwined and interwoven into her story. She, thereby, takes her readers to another level while still offering an insightful journey into the realm of the unknown, the unconscious mind and of the vivid imagination. I enjoyed "Six Weeks to Yehidah" so much that I often found myself thinking about the book, the different characters, and the overall message of the book long after the story was over. I also went to Mellissa Studdard's website to check it out, and was delighted to find the 'My Yehidah Journal', a journal that one can buy to begin one's own personal journey of discovery to Yehidah. I highly recommend the book "Six Weeks to Yehidah" to anyone who needs a little help in finding their way and their own path.
Reviews-ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Sylvia H. for Readers Favorite In the book "Six Weeks to Yehidah" by Melissa Studdard, ten year old Annalise of Verdant Hills imagines that she has fallen asleep under a tree while talking and singing to a pair of sheep. She then dreams that she is in a new land over the clouds where even the animals can speak and think for themselves. In reality, Annalise was swept away by flood waters during a violent storm in her home town. During her comatose state in the hospital, Annalise is taken on a journey of her imagination, her mind and of her soul. And while in the company of her two talking sheep who walk on their hind legs and represent her totems, Annalise discovers her true Yehidah(awareness)and is therefore guided to the path of her awakening. Mellisa Studdard's "Six Weeks to Yehidah" was a mind blowing, imaginative journey and a soul awakening wonderful read. It is a book that older children, young adults and the young at heart and of the soul will absolutely devour and enjoy. In each chapter of Melissa's book, she has written valuable learning lessons that are entwined and interwoven into her story. She, thereby, takes her readers to another level while still offering an insightful journey into the realm of the unknown, the unconscious mind and of the vivid imagination. I enjoyed "Six Weeks to Yehidah" so much that I often found myself thinking about the book, the different characters, and the overall message of the book long after the story was over. I also went to Mellissa Studdard's website to check it out, and was delighted to find the 'My Yehidah Journal', a journal that one can buy to begin one's own personal journey of discovery to Yehidah. I highly recommend the book "Six Weeks to Yehidah" to anyone who needs a little help in finding their way and their own path.
Bean76 More than 1 year ago
This fun little book is about a girl names Annalise who is truly a free spirit. Right from the beginning I was amazed at how happy and free she is with herself, as she walked out the door during a rainstorm, and took a walk with her two favorite sheep, making up a new song as she went. Annalise falls asleep under a tree and finds herself, and her sheep Mabel and Mimi, walking and talking together in the clouds. There they meet Bob, Annalise's imaginary friend of earlier days. Bob takes Annalise on many adventures through the clouds, and Annalise has to solve many difficult tasks. These tasks teach Annalise more about herself, how all living things are connected, and how to be truly enlightened through serving and loving others. This book has a very "Dorothy in Oz" feel to it, but is not an adventure written merely for the sake of an adventure. The book's premise is to teach about finding inner strength and being one with others through serving them. There are several religious elements and teachings in the story, particularly Buddhism. Some specific concepts mentioned are nirvana, rebirth or reincarnation, and the terms Namaste and Bodhisattva. The main lesson I believe Annalise learns is that she has inherent strengths, skills, and knowledge that she didn't know she had. This realization empowers her to be content with who she is and to share this empowerment with others. These concepts may go right over a young reader's head , so there is a companion journal/workbook, My Yehidah, that poses questions about the story and provides corresponding writing and drawing activities. Throughout the book, whether in her world or her dream world, Annalise was never scared about being away from home or fearful of what she might find. She never got angry or frustrated. She just sang songs, talked with her sheep and Bob, and found everything exciting and amazing. Even in the beginning of the book Annalise went outside to play during a rainstorm. She didn't care one bit she was getting wet and cold. This excessive happiness just didn't seem normal to me. I don't know any child who is constantly happy like this, and I can't say if children reading this book will relate to Annalise in this way. Even in Oz, Dorothy worried a bit here and there in her adventures - "Lions, and tigers, and bears! Oh my!" This lack of full human emotion is a bit of a detriment to the lessons the author attempts to convey. Annalise moves so easily through her process of enlightenment, but what about someone who is not so happy? What about people who are more doubtful? What about people who worry about normal things? What about the child who would rather just wake up from the dream and see her mommy? These would be some big hurdles in the story if the main character had more human cares and concerns. Overall, I liked this book very much, and I plan to read it to my own children and get their views on it. The writing style is excellent, the settings are characters are very beautiful and loving, and Mabel and Mimi are especially funny. The book is quite a new and fascinating approach to teaching about enlightenment. I think the companion journal/workbook would be wonderful for readers to use to seek out their own inner strength and self-validation.
Dave_Hoing More than 1 year ago
In Six Weeks to Yehidah, author Melissa Studdard gives her readers a rollicking account of a young girl¿s adventures in a magical ¿other-where.¿ After 10-year-old Annalise and her two pet sheep, Mabel and Mimi, are caught in an unexpected flash flood, they awaken to find themselves transported to a place above the clouds. Here they meet a number of strange and wondrous beings, from Bob, a man made of light, to Hagski, a nasty bag lady who likes to make rules, to a shaman named Tony and his wise mother Kàna. Here, too, they find that animals talk and musical instruments sprout from the ground like corn. Annalise visits islands and special gardens and a tunnel through the ocean, all the while learning lessons about herself and the nature of the universe. In the end Annalise must decide whether to remain in her wonderland of serenity and adventure, or to return to her life on earth bearing an important message. Combining the clever word play of Lewis Carroll, the delightfulness of the Oz books, and the philosophical underpinnings of C.S. Lewis and the Buddist Bodhisattva, Six Weeks to Yehidah is a tour-de-force of excellent writing and startling imagination, and a gentle exploration of the interconnectedness of all things.
WhinzaKNdoro More than 1 year ago
What debut novelist, Melissa Studdard, has cryptically crafted, in the lively and fantastically entertaining Six Weeks To Yehidah (SWTY), at the very least might be a Möbius strip in this rather fast-paced, mostly plot and idea driven narrative that unfolds in myriad and unexpected ways, and which begs this final inquiry - what really happens to our precocious, ten-year old protagonist, after she follows that initial flashing light into the hills? Light that might, or might not be, Bob's first anonymous appearance, one of its more luminous than colorful characters, and who at one point confesses "Only where it was necessary to lead you, Annalise. Mostly to the hills." There's more with this assessment of light leading a certain person to the hills which I'll build on in my closing. There's, of course, alluded to in the word hills and postfixed likewise to her name with the -of the Verdant Hills, that sense of the hero or heroine's precarious quest into the faraway. SWTY borrows somewhat from classic fairytales where children, usually orphaned (so they encounter no hindrance in leaving home) subsequently venture off into the unknown, literally as well as figuratively. It comes then as no surprise that Annalise's mom is a single parent, and this not only modernizes this story but also Americanizes it, although its appeal - as are its new ageish ideas universal. Accompanying her, as obligatory in such undertakings, are her opinionated wondersheep who, now as a trio, encounter a kaleidoscope of numerous characters with names like Ima Angel (I-am-a-angel?), Cosmo Skyler: Observer of Clouds, Hagski, but most clearly or cleverly delineated by their actions. Now while some may find fault with Annalise not being more fleshed-out - I didn't, since for starters, she's clearly an archetype and two, as Heraclitus claimed that 'Character is destiny' her insights and evolution comes about by her perceptiveness, as this passage illuminates, showcasing too Studdard's writerly merits: Annalise noticed that when Ima looked at someone, she honored them with her eyes. It wasn't that she looked for a long time; her eyes just held a person closely, as if that person were receiving the attention of her entire being for the duration of the look. Ima didn't need to use her mouth to smile, either, because something inside her was always smiling. Of the myriad themes interspersed in SWTY (some beyond this brief review's scope), one of the most central is the conscious and deliberate act of looking/observing not only to find (new) understanding and meaning, in situations, people, or worldviews but also as a surrogate for and into meditation. In short, sight is insight and religion without the dogma, and thus by extension SWTY is, as its author, perhaps a new age-like teacher-in-training, an illumination. Implied too is how not only are dreams perhaps a form of involuntary unconscious meditation, but have serving in them as a kind of holy grail of the imagination, our often neglected but effective means to lucid problem solving. This is why light in SWTY is as much a protagonist as Annalise (phonetically sounds like Analyze?) herself, and it'd be argued Studdard, in a nutshell, is appealing to us across all age-groups to see and embrace how light manifests itself in our lives, through love, wisdom gained, or better options practiced, as always, 'in light of.' Get and read this book for yourself and unravel that light in your yehidah.
ProfSC More than 1 year ago
What should we expect from a classic children's tale? Imaginary gardens with real toads in them? An enchanting story told with wisdom and great charm? One you can read aloud to your own precocious, nearly-perfect child, then read again yourself for the adult insights and delights it reveals and the places of enchantment that it takes you to? Choose all of the above and enter into the plausible and implausible wise and whimsical, alluring world Professor Studdard has created for you in Six Weeks to Yehidah. It's a story destined to be an adolescent-adult classic. Enter this wonderful world of the almost perfectly mannered Miss. Annalise of the Verdant Hills in this tale of wonder and delight. Take a child with you or be one yourself as you travel through the real imaginary places of clouds and seascapes and great truths. Your only regret will be that the story ends, though, of course, in it's ending is it's beginning, and the promise that one can begin again. Learning universal truths has never so much fun.
NarrativeNonfiction More than 1 year ago
Six Weeks to Yehidah is the story of Annalise, a young girl who enters a wondrous dreamscape. With the company of two very special friends, she takes a journey and meets a variety of intriguing and highly entertaining characters. Ultimately, it is up to Annalise to solve the greatest riddle of all: why she's here, and what it all means. Her each step towards this answer is both delightful and thought-provoking. Six Weeks to Yehidah is a must read for any young person who knows there is more to life than what is right in front of our eyes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was magic from beginning to end..filled with wisdom and enchanting surprises. A land of OZ style story which reinforces that Oz never did give the tin man anything he did not already possess. A humanitarian love story filled with oodles of brilliant charms! A book filled with a soul enriching celebration of humanitarian love that gives light to the wounded soul via reality and fantasy. "The greatest thing a human does in this world is to see something"...quoted John Ruskin. My sediments exactly regarding this delightful story...it will make you see things you never thought of before.