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Skirt! Rules for the Workplace: An Irreverent Guide to Advancing Your Career
     

Skirt! Rules for the Workplace: An Irreverent Guide to Advancing Your Career

by Kelly Love Johnson
 

Humorous, practical, tell-it-like-it-is advice for women in the workplace.

Only seven of the Fortune 500 companies have a woman as CEO or President, and nearly 20 percent of them don’t have any women at all in upper management. In the bestselling tradition of Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office and Who Moved My Cheese, Kelly Love

Overview

Humorous, practical, tell-it-like-it-is advice for women in the workplace.

Only seven of the Fortune 500 companies have a woman as CEO or President, and nearly 20 percent of them don’t have any women at all in upper management. In the bestselling tradition of Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office and Who Moved My Cheese, Kelly Love Johnson lays out practical advice for career women who are starting out or who wonder why they’re not moving ahead. This is the book every graduating senior, receptionist, and entry-level assistant will steal from her best friend. Johnson shows how speaking out, embracing change, and changing others’ perceptions of working women can bring both personal and professional success. Chapters include: "The Alphas and the Betas: Personality Types," "A Feminist Says What?" and "Work Like a Girl." Using personal anecdotes, tried and true tactics, and a directory of resources and Web sites, Johnson shows readers how women can move ahead in the workplace just as well as men, as Ginger Rogers once said, "but backwards and in high heels."

 

 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781599212234
Publisher:
Skirt!
Publication date:
01/01/2008
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.80(d)

Read an Excerpt

Rung by Rung: Eight Tips for Getting Ahead at Work

Control your temper. Assertiveness and tantrums do not go hand in hand. In fact, having a tantrum at the office is the fastest way to ensure your boss and co-workers won't take you seriously. We all have tricks to keep our anger in check—figure out what works for you and use it.

Love change. Don't just expect it; greet it with hearty applause. Change is good. It's a lot easier to get ahead if you move forward on a wave of growth—and companies that resist change don't grow. You'll also stand out from the crowd, because most people react to change with fear and resistance.

Listen, don't talk. This doesn't mean you have to be the creepy, quiet one in the office. But take note of how often your superiors engage in personal chit-chat. If it happens often, rest assured that it will just be a matter of time before Chatty Cathy is on her way out and inscrutable you gets her job.

Shoot for perfection. Even if you're having a bad day, don't turn in half-finished or half-assed work. There are so many substandard chair-warmers out there; you don't even have to exert that much effort to be perfect. Spell-check everything, even casual emails. Double-check facts and figures. Know your deadlines. Ask for help or advice (from the outside—see "Friends and Enemies"). Don’t rush through something just to get out the door by five.

Don't watch the clock. Even if this is "just a job" and you're going to write the next great American novel next year, treat every job like it's a career. As someone who has fired, I mean worked with, several employees who ran off like a shot as soon as the second hand lined up with the twelve at five o'clock, I can tell you that your boss will notice that you'd rather be anywhere else.

Be your own measure. Don't use your co-workers as a gauge for your success. Even if everyone else in the office spends afternoons surfing the 'net for pleasure or phoning contractors for their new kitchen, don't do it. You'd be surprised who's watching and listening, and you'll stand out if you're the productive one.

Dress the part. You don't have to spend a million to look like you did if you're a smart shopper. Even if the workplace is creative-casual and your boss dresses down, you can still get a lot of mileage out of looking professional.

Lead before you are asked. Don't wait for a promotion to start taking on new challenges. Do your job, but keep one eye peeled for learning opportunities. Just because you've never used a software program or written a press release doesn't mean you can't figure it out. (Every software program has a help file, and you can find examples of press releases by Googling "press release").

Meet the Author

Kelly Love Johnson got her first job at age fifteen, worked full-time through two college degrees, and earned her management skills badge by swimming with sharks and being thrown to the wolves. She hasn’t worn pantyhose or fetched coffee in ten years. She lives in Charleston, S.C.

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