Slave: My True Story

Slave: My True Story

by Mende Nazer, Damien Lewis

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780786738977
Publisher: PublicAffairs
Publication date: 04/28/2009
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 280
Sales rank: 532,873
File size: 721 KB

About the Author

Damien Lewis is a lifelong dog lover and award-winning writer who spent twenty years reporting from war, disaster, and conflict zones for the BBC and other global news organizations. He is the bestselling author of more than twenty books, many of which are being adapted into films or television series, including military history, thrillers, and several acclaimed memoirs about military working dogs. Lewis lives in Dorchester, England.

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Slave: My True Story 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 36 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in feeling lonley
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He looks at Ella
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is chained to a pole
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sitsin a a corner chained to the wall
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Waits naked, blindfoled and cuffed to a pole for her master
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a masterpiece. Once you start reading yu just can't put it down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IT IS A SAD STORY AND IT MADE ME SAY WHATDID IT FEEL LIKE TO HAVETO LIVE LIKE THAT
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You rellay now uour yoyr stuff
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
great book to read, saddened me with everything this woman went through at the hands of her capturers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I heard about this book on the Oprah show. I must confess it sat on a shelf in my library for a year before I finally picked it up to read. From the first page I could not put it down! I was shocked, sickened, saddened and shamed at what Mende went through ... and that it should be happening today, in a supposed enlightened world, right under our very noses. How appalling that is! Mende's life in her beloved Nuba Mountains shows what truly gentle and peaceful human lives are being snuffed out savagely through genocide ... or slowly through the tortures of slavery. I have been deeply affected by this book. My eyes have been opened wider than I would have wished, but I know I will refuse to keep them closed again!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished reading this book yesterday. I had never heard of the story or the author. I just saw the cover in the library and borrowed it. The story is astonishing, heartbreaking, and triumphant all at once. I was heartened that Mende Nazar still had enough spirit to push on and experience the kindness of good people in the world. May God Bless her and all who supported and continue to support her in her journey. I was blessed to read this book because I was once again reminded that my life and how it turns out will be a fantastic journey as long as I remain hopeful and undeterred. Shame on the previous reviewer for being so hateful towards this woman's story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This and other books that accuse Sudan of slavery are just an attack. This is a pathetic way of pointing fingers so that other countries look better than this one. The story is invalid and the writer is obviously prejudiced against Arabs. This proves that false statements, rumors, and lies have gone way too far in today's world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this is a really sad & depressing book.It's a really,really,really SAD book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had no idea when I started this book that I would not be able to put it down. I read it in almost one sitting. Mende Nazer's story of her young years with her family in the Nuba region of Sudan and later on her years as a young teenage slave was heartbreaking but at the same time it showed how strong her parents' early influence was. The fact that she did not become bitter toward her oppressors and still looks forward to so much is the lasting impression with which I came away. I did not think that this story of modern day slavery was depressing. Instead it showed the power of the human spirit and it also demonstrated for me how little I know of what is going on in the world and that there is so much room for improvement. First, however, we have to be made aware on a human level and then hopefully we can contribute.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book. It's amazing how Mende survived at all. It is real inspirational. I highly recommend this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read Ms. Nazer's book with the same degree of dread as when I read Francis Bok's book. Their tales of abduction are so similar. These people cause chaos and death and snatch the young ones away. Ms. Nazer was able, miraculously, to escape the bondage. These 'slave' owners keep the enslaved ignorant with no knowledge of the outside world. We, who have known only freedom, find it inconceivable that slavery still exists, but it indeed does, right under our noses. I remember someone saying that when people hold others down in bondage, they themselves are kept down with them. All of us ARE our brothers keeper and responsible for each other.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I could not put this boook down. I was completely shocked and sickened at the fact that there are people out there in the world that could treat a human being so badly. The courage that Mende has is amazing. To be taken from her family at such a young age, brutalized, humiliated and abused year after year, and having to keep wondering if your family is alive. Mende is an amazing person.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Journalist Damien Lewis, Slave's co-author, helped Nazer publicize her story in order to advance her asylum claim with the British government. Sensational memoirs have proliferated in the last several years, but few are as starkly powerful as this one: Nazer tells her story with lucid simplicity, deftly evoking her earlier self to convey that girl's innocence, violent loss, and compromise with survival. What comes across as almost more tragic than her physical and psychological exploitation is the toll it takes on her faith: Nazer and her abductors, captors, and masters are all Muslims, yet everyone is constantly reminded of where she stands. The slave trade still flourishes in some parts of the world, and Slave's real gut-punch arrives in its revelations about slavery in first-world urban settings, behind the doors of high-class immigrant communities. Nazer says she still hopes to return to her village as a doctor, when she can be sure the powerful slave network won't retaliate for her public stance. It's appropriate, then, that her book performs a kind of surgery, inflicting pain and healing in equal measure.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A mind-boggling true story of a child's suffering and survival. Mende Nazar should be commended for her courage to tell this heartbreaking story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An amazingly heartbreaking story of suffering and survival. Mende Nazar should be commended for her grace and courage in telling this mind-boggling true story to the world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿Slave¿ is a powerful tale that will enlighten the reader¿s awareness of the present day atrocity of slavery, which still haunts many in Africa today. Though some may argue that the author¿s experience pales in comparison to the experience of those slaves who spent an entire lifetime in bondage, the mere fact that such horrendous acts still occur today should be reason enough to shock and disgust you. This book will no doubt sadden and anger you. It will also motivate many into action to fight against the horrors of slavery in the 21st Century. Most importantly, it should cause one to celebrate the everyday freedom we take for granted.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Written in pure, simple and honest prose obviously from the heart, this memoir is very unique. First of all learning about Arab riders who burn down villages, murder men and women and capture young girls and boys was certainly eye opening. My mind had trouble grasping that this is occurring as I am writing this. Mende's description of life in her village before her capture, of all of the love and community she felt there and how the villagers coexisted in peace, was beautifully described. She obviously has great love for her famiy and relatives as well as the Nuba mountains. The horror of her rape and enslavement must have been wrenching for her to write but she is obviuosly a very strong woman and wants not only to be granted permanent asylum in London but to stop the continued slavery. Her treatment by her owner was gruesome and so malicious its hard to grasp. Her constant hope for the future is inspiring. This is a very intelligent, gifted writer who should have a brilliant future. I think this is a memoir that needs to be read by as many readers as possible, it is timely and important.