ISBN-10:
0262181835
ISBN-13:
9780262181839
Pub. Date:
06/13/1997
Publisher:
MIT Press
Slaves of the Machine: The Quickening of Computer Technology

Slaves of the Machine: The Quickening of Computer Technology

by Gregory J. E. Rawlins

Hardcover

Current price is , Original price is $35.0. You

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Please check back later for updated availability.

Item is available through our marketplace sellers.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262181839
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 06/13/1997
Pages: 240
Product dimensions: 6.23(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.67(d)

Table of Contents

Preface ix
1 A Strange New Machine
1(20)
2 The Greed for Speed
21(20)
3 Precisely Speaking
41(22)
4 The Subjunctive Mood
63(20)
5 Limits to Growth
83(22)
6 Thinking About Thinking
105(24)
My Thanks 129(2)
Index 131

What People are Saying About This

Washington Post - John Schwartz

[H]ere's something completely different: a computer book for smart people—folks who may not know much about PC's but who don't enjoy being talked down to, either.... It's an elegant, thought-provoking little book, full of literary references and history.

Douglas Hofstadter

Slaves of the Machine is a scintillatingly written exploration of machines, of computers, of life, and of human nature. Filled with original analogies and metaphors, crammed with humor and cynicism, this book is both light and deep at the same time—no small achievement. Any thinking being who picks it up will find it engrossing, disorienting, disturbing, and deliciously provocative.

Michael L. Dertouzos

In this entertaining, thought provoking and rich-in-metaphors book, Rawlins explores and explains the computer, from its modest origins to its most immodest potential relationship with humans. A pleasant 'must' for anyone who cares about the broader 'what', 'how' and 'how far' of these machines.

From the Publisher

In this entertaining, thought provoking and rich-in-metaphors book, Rawlins explores and explains the computer, from its modest origins to its most immodest potential relationship with humans. A pleasant 'must' for anyone who cares about the broader 'what', 'how' and 'how far' of these machines.

Michael L. Dertouzos, Director, MIT Laboratory for Computer Science; author of What Will Be

Slaves of the Machine is a scintillatingly written exploration of machines, of computers, of life, and of human nature. Filled with original analogies and metaphors, crammed with humor and cynicism, this book is both light and deep at the same time—no small achievement. Any thinking being who picks it up will find it engrossing, disorienting, disturbing, and deliciously provocative.

Douglas Hofstadter, author of Gödel, Escher, Bach, Le Ton beau de Marot, and Metamagical Themas

[H]ere's something completely different: a computer book for smart people—folks who may not know much about PC's but who don't enjoy being talked down to, either.... It's an elegant, thought-provoking little book, full of literary references and history.

John Schwartz, Washington Post

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews