Slayer of Gods (Lord Meren Series #6)

Slayer of Gods (Lord Meren Series #6)

by Lynda S. Robinson

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Overview

Armed with the certainty that Queen Nefertiti did not die of the plague but was murdered with poison, Lord Meren is hot on the trail of her killer.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780446690386
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
Publication date: 05/01/2003
Series: Lord Meren Series , #6
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.62(d)

Customer Reviews

Slayer of Gods (Lord Meren Series #6) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Another case, another hussy. From time to time, Robinson will introduce an appealing female character into this series, but by gosh, they always turn out to be either stupid, evil or dead, unless of course they are all three. I was wondering if Meren¿s middle daughter, who was looking pretty good in the last book, would turn out to be a spymistress for Egypt¿s enemies, but maybe Robinson is saving that for the oldest sister. Until the last couple of books, this series had been excellent in terms of creating a vivid setting, interesting stories, and appealing main characters. The one serious flaw was the maddening streak of misogyny. Well, that remains constant, but unfortunately the plotting is going down hill. Meren and Kysen need a long vacation, because they don¿t seem to be thinking too clearly in this book. Among their least intelligent decisions: Meren, recuperating from an assassination attempt and knowing that someone who is extremely clever and ruthless is out to get him, goes for an early- morning walk by himself, and is, of course, attacked again. Discipline seems to be breaking down within his crack team of charioteers, too. One of the few surviving potential witnesses has been taken into protective custody in his home, and his guards let her wander off with equally predictable results. I don¿t want to say too much about the ending, but it creates as many questions as it answers. Maybe Robinson should take a break from this series; I certainly intend to.
juglicerr on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another case, another hussy. From time to time, Robinson will introduce an appealing female character into this series, but by gosh, they always turn out to be either stupid, evil or dead, unless of course they are all three. I was wondering if Meren's middle daughter, who was looking pretty good in the last book, would turn out to be a spymistress for Egypt's enemies, but maybe Robinson is saving that for the oldest sister. Until the last couple of books, this series had been excellent in terms of creating a vivid setting, interesting stories, and appealing main characters. The one serious flaw was the maddening streak of misogyny. Well, that remains constant, but unfortunately the plotting is going down hill. Meren and Kysen need a long vacation, because they don't seem to be thinking too clearly in this book. Among their least intelligent decisions: Meren, recuperating from an assassination attempt and knowing that someone who is extremely clever and ruthless is out to get him, goes for an early- morning walk by himself, and is, of course, attacked again. Discipline seems to be breaking down within his crack team of charioteers, too. One of the few surviving potential witnesses has been taken into protective custody in his home, and his guards let her wander off with equally predictable results. I don't want to say too much about the ending, but it creates as many questions as it answers. Maybe Robinson should take a break from this series; I certainly intend to.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Slayer of gods is a terific murder mystery, set in anicient Egption time period. The book is bound to keep the reader's attention right til the end.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Lynda Robinson's fans always look forward to another in her Lord Meren series, and they will not be disappointed in her latest addition to the adventures of 'The Eyes and Ears of Pharaoh'. I must confess I was beginning to wonder about Lord Meren's detecting abilities, since by this time he had STILL not solved the mystery of Nefertiti's death, but the resolution finally appears in this book! Before that, we are re-introduced to his family members as well as to many colorful characters from earlier in the series. I am sorry that we did not see the reappearance of Naram-sin, an intriguing and slightly sinister character from her previous book, whose interest in Lord Meren was, shall we say, somewhat less than wholesome. Perhaps in her next novel, which I am sure will be as eagerly awaited and gladly received as the others.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Who did it? Readers of this suspenseful, colorful, and mesmerizing series have wondered for quite a while! Who poisoned Queen Nefertiti, the beautiful queen of the heretic pharoh Akhenhaten! In ¿Slayer of Gods,¿ author Lynda S. Robinson feels enough is enough and brings the longest ¿narrative hook¿ in mystery fiction to a close. Thank goodness! This is not to say that this series, now numbering six, isn¿t worth the time it takes (years, if you read them as they were published!). Dr. Robinson expertly weaves the historic with the histrionic and has, truly, legions of followers. Her narrative description seems unquestionable, her knowledge of history keen, and her grasp of the basics of mystery writing far exceeds the minimal! This series, her ¿Lord Meren¿ adventures, is set in the 14th century B.C. and young Tutankhamun is on the throne (and we know it¿s only a brief sit!), but his ¿eyes and ears¿ (Lord Meren) is directed to solve the queen¿s death, questionable under any circumstances. Of course, delving into this investigation is far more complicated than it would seem. Conspiracies abound--some real and some imaginary. Lord Meren discovers that numerous plots continue to run rampant--from the priests in the temples to outside instigators who stood to gain, not only with Nefertiti¿s death, but that of her husband.These enemies of the state do not hesitate to kill the opposition, often quite cruelly (as we¿ve seen in the previous five episodes, too). In ¿Slayer of the Gods,¿ Meren finally has his suspects narrowed to one. It is up to him to catch him, never a more dangerouso fiend to be found, a killer who will stop at nothing, as he represents issues far greater than the death of any single invidivudal. Along with Anath, ( She¿s the ¿Eyes of Babylon¿), a sexy spy herself, Lord Meren is determined to find the truth, even at the cost of his own life. Again Meren¿s household (daughters and adopted son) aid in this quest. Author Robinson does not disappoint us. Episode Number Six, now, has been worth the wait!
harstan More than 1 year ago
Now in his fifth year as the Pharaoh, Tutankhamun continues his efforts to restore the ancient ways that his predecessor Akhenaten disdained. Tutankhamun somewhat finds success in returning to the old capital of Memphis and worshipping the ancient gods instead of just Aten. However, Tutankhamun has never fully recovered from the sudden disappearance of Akhenaten¿s Queen Nefertiti, who acted like a mother towards him.

Detective Lord Meren learns who poisoned Nefertiti, but not the identity of the high-ranking instigator of the dastardly act. To provide some closure for his Pharaoh, Meren begins a dangerous journey to uncover a truth cloaked in a deadly conspiracy that could prove quite deadly to him, his enlisted partner the Babylonian spy Anath, and even his family.

The sixth Lord Meren Ancient Egypt mystery is the best of a powerful series as Lynda S. Robinson combines fact with conjecture and turns it into a wonderful historical fiction novel. The story line is clever and fourteenth century BC Egypt appears thriving today. The cast, including real persona, adds to the feel of authenticity and plausibility. Historical fiction and mystery aficionados will derive joy from SLAYER OF GODS.

Harriet Klausner