The Snapper: A Novel

The Snapper: A Novel

by Roddy Doyle
4.5 2

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Overview

The Snapper: A Novel by Roddy Doyle

Twenty-year-old Sharon Rabbitte is pregnant. She's also unmarried, living at home, working in a grocery store, and keeping the father's identity a secret. Her own father, Jimmy Sr., is shocked by the news. Her mother says very little. Her friends and neighbors all want to know whose "snapper" Sharon is carrying.

In his sparkling second novel, Roddy Doyle observes the progression of Sharon's pregnancy and its impact on the Rabbitte family—especially on Jimmy Sr.—with wit, candor, and surprising authenticity.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781440625282
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/01/1992
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 224
Sales rank: 301,102
File size: 178 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

RODDY DOYLE was born in Dublin in 1958. He is the author of nine acclaimed novels including The Commitments, The Snapper, and The Van, two collections of short stories, Rory & Ita, a memoir about his parents, and most recently, Two Pints, a collection of dialogues. He won the Booker Prize in 1993 for Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. The Commitments was adapted into a hit film in the 1990s and is now a West End show.

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The Snapper 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
A-READER24 More than 1 year ago
Everything about this story is interesting. The characters and plot are all wonderful. I loved Sharon's family, especially her father, he was hilarious! The way Barrytown reacts to Sharon's pregnancy and the paternity of the baby ia so fun. Even though the circumstances aren't so great for Sharon, Mr. Doyle makes it still OK to laugh.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Roddy Doyle paints an entertaining and hilarious tale of a young woman's pregnancy. It is interesting that Doyle can write so poignantly about pregnancy from a woman's perspective. I have enjoyed reading the Irish dialect and the more you repeat the words aloud the funnier it sounds.