The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories

The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories

by Ernest Hemingway
3.8 17

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Overview

The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories by Ernest Hemingway

The ideal introduction to the genius of Ernest Hemingway, The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories contains ten of Hemingway's most acclaimed and popular works of short fiction. Selected from Winner Take Nothing, Men Without Women, and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories, this collection includes "The Killers," the first of Hemingway's mature stories to be accepted by an American periodical; the autobiographical "Fathers and Sons," which alludes, for the first time in Hemingway's career, to his father's suicide; "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," a "brilliant fusion of personal observation, hearsay and invention," wrote Hemingway's biographer, Carlos Baker; and the title story itself, of which Hemingway said: "I put all the true stuff in," with enough material, he boasted, to fill four novels. Beautiful in their simplicity, startling in their originality, and unsurpassed in their craftsmanship, the stories in this volume highlight one of America's master storytellers at the top of his form.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780743237321
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 07/25/2002
Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 144
Sales rank: 139,184
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Ernest Hemingway did more to influence the style of English prose than any other writer of his time. Publication of The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms immediately established him as one of the greatest literary lights of the 20th century. His classic novella The Old Man and the Sea won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953. Hemingway was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954. He died in 1961.

Date of Birth:

July 21, 1899

Date of Death:

July 2, 1961

Place of Birth:

Oak Park, Illinois

Place of Death:

Ketchum, Idaho

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The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had never read anything by Hemingway until a friend loaned me this collection of ten short stories. Although I can't comment on Hemingway's entire body of work, in these stories he seems to find disappointment in his major characters. His characters are all interesting, flawed human beings, with the exception of the women, whom he seems to revere and loathe at the same time. The men are all consumed with manly pursuits like gambling, hunting, boxing and warfare. Hemingway created vivid scenes with short bursts of dialogue and long run-on sentences jam-packed with prepositional phrases. Like medicine, I knew these stories were 'good for me' in a way the next best-seller never will be, yet the acidic tang and sticky-sweet syrup taste lingered long after.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hemingway does a great job in the story of showing the regrets of a dying man. It shows how his choices have lead him down the path he is currently on. It creats in one the desire to act now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm still reading the first story. It's a tough read, but it is worth it. The character is very interesting, talking about his unfilled wish to write stories based on the experiences he's had.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I am probably one of the few people who find Hemingway's writing a disappointment. I felt this way the first time I read Faulkner, too. I asked myself 'What is he trying to say?' or 'Why am I reading this if it's not meaningful or enjoyable to me?' I persist through books I am not liking because I felt like this during the first hundred pages of 'A Tale of Two Cities' and that ended up being one of my favorite books. Not this book, however. These stories felt to me like Hemingway was purging himself of something and not trying to tell me a story. Some literature I guess can be like that but not the kind I like to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this in my Honors English class, and not many people liked it. Though I don't exactly like the subjects he writes about, I can see why Hemingway is considered a literary genius. His writing is straight and to the point. I must say, though, it takes a while to get used to his writing. When I read aloud, I stumbled for a while until I got the swing of things.