ISBN-10:
0739174126
ISBN-13:
9780739174128
Pub. Date:
12/22/2012
Publisher:
Lexington Books
Social Media and the Value of Truth

Social Media and the Value of Truth

by Berrin Beasley, Mitchell Haney

Hardcover

View All Available Formats & Editions
Current price is , Original price is $82.0. You
Select a Purchase Option
  • purchase options
    $55.28 $82.00 Save 33% Current price is $55.28, Original price is $82. You Save 33%.
  • purchase options

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780739174128
Publisher: Lexington Books
Publication date: 12/22/2012
Pages: 112
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Berrin Beasley is associate professor of communication at the University of North Florida. Dr. Beasley works in the areas of media ethics, the media's portrayal of women, and journalism history. Her research has been published in numerous journals and books.

Mitchell Haney is associate professor of philosophy and a director of the Florida Blue Center for Ethics at the University of North Florida. Dr. Haney works in the areas of Business Ethics, Ethics of Leisure, and Ethical Theory. His research has been published nationally and internationally. His is the co-editor (with A. David Kline) of The Value of Time and Leisure in a World of Work (Lexington, 2010).

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction
Chapter 1: Social Media, Speed, and Authentic Living
Chapter 2: I don’t do the news: If something important happens, my friends will tell me on Facebook
Chapter 3: The Real Name Requirement and Ethics of Online Identity
Chapter 4: Social Media, Self-Deception, and Self-Respect
Chapter 5: “It’s About Trust”: Should Government Intervene to Compel Disclosure in Social Media?
Chapter 6: Front-Stage and Back-Stage Kantian Ethics: Promoting Truth and Trust in Social Media Communities
Chapter 7: Gossip in the Digital Age
About the Contributors

What People are Saying About This

Clifford G. Christians

In the blizzard of work on the new social media, this learned book is indispensable. Luminary contributors from philosophy and commmunications know how to make an arugment and clarify ideas. They judge virtual reality by the truth principle, and their smart thinking on it makes this provocative book distinctive. While lucid on social network technologies, the authors teach us that authentic living is central.

Joseph W. Ulatowski

Whereas Socrates and Aristotle desired firsthand peripatetic conversations with the Athenian hoi polloi, members of the contemporary world seemingly prefer to wander the virtual meta-verse as a clandestine avatar unbound by moral or social norms. In Social Media and the Value of Truth, Beasley and Haney have gathered together an outstandingly erudite collection of essays by some of the most cerebral scholars among us. Whether it’s resistance to shedding our mortally bound coils, a celebration or denunciation of frictionless sharing, or inconspicuous consumption among members of the virtual village, contributing authors have tackled the most captivating questions of our socially mediated time. Ethicists, journalists, sociologists, psychologists, Tweeters, Pinteresters, Tumblrers, Facebook users, Google+ enthusiasts, and even those harboring disdain for all things associated with social media undoubtedly will find the content of this anthology accessible and full of provocative nuggets worthy of serious and extended reflection.

Annette M. Holba

Berrin Beasely and Mitch Haney’s edited book, Social Media and the Value of Truth, involves existential reflection for the 21st century. This collection of essays opens our minds and bodies to think about the nature of truth, experience, the self, and the other in a fast-paced, unreflective, instantaneous, and inescapably deceptive environment of the socially mediated virtual metaverse in which we make our home. This edited volume is a must read for students and scholars interested in understanding our environment philosophically; it aims at cultivating phronesis and praxis for living in a complex world driven by social media and where we find ourselves embedded with others.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews