ISBN-10:
0335193595
ISBN-13:
9780335193592
Pub. Date:
10/28/1996
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Education
Social Policy for Nurses and the Caring Professions (Social Science for Nurses and the Caring Professions Series) / Edition 1

Social Policy for Nurses and the Caring Professions (Social Science for Nurses and the Caring Professions Series) / Edition 1

by Louise Ackers, Pamela Abbott

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780335193592
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
Publication date: 10/28/1996
Series: Social Science for Nurses and the Caring Professions Ser.
Pages: 264
Product dimensions: 6.70(w) x 9.40(h) x 0.71(d)

Table of Contents

Series editor's preface xiii
What is social policy?
1(16)
Introduction
1(5)
The discipline of social policy
1(1)
The changing nature of social policy
2(2)
The mixed economy of welfare
4(2)
Perspectives on welfare: The influence of ideology
6(4)
'Residual' and 'institutional' welfare states
7(1)
Welfare regimes
8(2)
The welfare state and individual freedom
10(1)
Feminist and black criticisms of state welfare
10(1)
The development of the welfare mix in Britain
11(3)
Social policy and social goods
14(1)
Conclusions
15(1)
Summary
15(1)
Further reading
16(1)
The development of a welfare state
17(23)
Introduction
17(1)
State welfare and state intervention
18(2)
Laissez-faire
18(1)
The challenge to individualistic explanation
19(1)
The public provision of medicine
20(6)
Poverty and health
21(1)
Sanitary conditions and health
22(2)
Public health and personal health
24(1)
Individual health
25(1)
The growth of social work in late nineteenth-century Britain
26(2)
The Charity Organisations Society
27(1)
Ladies' Sanitary Reform Societies
27(1)
The twentieth century
28(9)
The collectivist challenge
28(1)
National efficiency
29(2)
The Liberal reforms
31(2)
Personal health care between the wars
33(1)
The National Health Service
34(1)
The classic welfare state
35(2)
Conclusions
37(1)
Summary
38(1)
Further reading
39(1)
Health inequalities and state health policies
40(29)
Introduction
40(1)
The structure of the NHS
41(2)
The NHS and equity
43(4)
Health inequalities in Britain
47(8)
Poverty and health inequalities
47(1)
Class, deprivation and health inequalities
48(2)
Unemployment and health inequalities
50(1)
Women and health inequalities
51(2)
Age and health inequalities
53(1)
Ethnicity and health inequality
53(1)
Regional variation in health status
54(1)
Explanations for health inequalities
55(5)
Health services: Equal access for equal need?
55(1)
The 'artefact' explanation
55(1)
Theories of natural and social selection
56(1)
Cultural/behavioural explanations
57(1)
Structural explanations
57(2)
Health and healthy policies
59(1)
Healthy policies: The way forward
60(7)
The Health of the Nation
62(2)
The New Public Health
64(3)
Conclusions
67(1)
Summary
67(1)
Further reading
67(2)
Poverty, inequality and social policy
69(27)
Introduction
69(3)
What is poverty? Issues of definition
72(9)
Problems of measurement: The poverty line
76(2)
What is poverty?
78(3)
Who are the poor? The incidence of poverty in Britain
81(7)
Poverty and the elderly population
82(1)
Poverty and disabled people
83(1)
Lone parents and poverty
84(1)
Low pay and poverty
84(1)
Unemployment and poverty
85(1)
Women and poverty
86(2)
Race and poverty
88(1)
Explaining the persistence of poverty and inequality
88(6)
A problem of people: Social pathology and cultural explanations
89(1)
A problem of management and planning: Reforming society
90(1)
A structural problem: Poverty as an inherent factor in capitalist society
91(1)
'Underclass' theories
92(1)
Implications for policy
93(1)
Conclusions
94(1)
Summary
95(1)
Further reading
95(1)
State income maintenance and welfare benefits
96(16)
Introduction
96(2)
Social security
97(1)
The British social security system
98(8)
Contributory benefits
100(3)
Non-contributory benefits which are not means-tested
103(2)
Means-tested benefits
105(1)
Universalism, selectivity and social security
106(2)
Conclusions
108(2)
Summary
110(1)
Further reading
111(1)
Privatization and social welfare
112(31)
Introduction
112(2)
The political context of recent privatization
114(2)
Privatization and the public
116(3)
Public attitudes to privatization
117(2)
Privatization and health care
119(11)
Public expenditure on health care
120(1)
The development of private and commercial health care
121(4)
The introduction of commercial sector management styles and methods
125(2)
NHS managed markets
127(3)
The impact of private provision on income in old age
130(9)
Sources of income in old age
131(1)
The implications of demographic pressures on pensions spending
132(1)
The future of the state pension
133(2)
Privatization and inequality in old age
135(3)
Privatization: Reducing the role of the state?
138(1)
The costs of private housing
139(2)
Conclusions: Privatization or changing state role?
141(1)
Summary
141(1)
Further reading
142(1)
The changing role of the voluntary sector in the provision of social welfare
143(22)
Introduction
143(1)
The Victorian legacy
144(2)
The voluntary sector in the welfare state
146(3)
What is the voluntary sector? Problems of definition
149(2)
The voluntary sector and housing: A case study
151(8)
The housing association movement
151(2)
The policy context
153(2)
Housing associations as voluntary organizations
155(2)
Voluntarism and community self-help: The Black voluntary housing movement
157(2)
The future of voluntarism
159(3)
Safeguarding volunteers and paid workers
160(1)
Voluntarism, altruism and 'paid volunteering'
161(1)
Voluntary activity, obligation and informal care
162(1)
Conclusions
163(1)
Summary
163(1)
Further reading
164(1)
The role of informal care
165(23)
Introduction
165(2)
Formal and informal care
166(1)
What is 'informal care?
167(2)
Caring for and caring about
168(1)
The costs of informal care
169(3)
The burden on women
170(2)
Informal care and state policy
172(2)
Gender and informal care
174(2)
Informal care and the 'carer': Who provides care?
176(5)
Women as informal carers
177(1)
Men as informal carers
177(1)
Gender and responsibility for informal care
178(1)
Children as informal carers
179(1)
Black carers
180(1)
Friends and neighbours
180(1)
Service support for carers
181(2)
Paying for informal care
183(2)
Invalid care allowance
183(1)
Paying informal carers
183(2)
Conclusions
185(1)
Summary
186(1)
Further reading
187(1)
The mixed economy of care: Welfare services for dependent people
188(23)
Introduction
188(2)
Community care services
190(1)
Development of community care
190(4)
Before the welfare state
190(1)
Community care in the welfare state
191(1)
Normalization
192(1)
Community care in the 1990s
193(1)
Older people and community care needs
194(7)
Old age and dependency
195(2)
Caring for older people
197(2)
Statutory services
199(1)
Preventing the move into residential care
200(1)
Providing care in the community
201(1)
The skills mix in community care
202(5)
The skills mix: A case study
203(4)
The mixed economy of care
207(2)
Conclusions
209(1)
Summary
209(1)
Further reading
210(1)
Welfare pluralism in the 1990s: The changing role of the state
211(16)
Introduction
211(1)
Liberalism and the welfare state
212(3)
Supply, demand and the price mechanism
213(1)
Taxation as coercion
214(1)
Consumer choice and the market
215(1)
The imperfect market
216(1)
Charitable capitalism?
216(2)
Voluntarism and philanthropy
217(1)
The free market and the authoritarian state
218(3)
Education: local autonomy and central control
218(1)
Housing policy
219(2)
Universal versus selective benefits
221(3)
Conclusions
224(1)
Summary
225(1)
Further reading
226(1)
Glossary 227(9)
References 236(19)
Index 255

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