ISBN-10:
1118702204
ISBN-13:
9781118702208
Pub. Date:
05/19/2014
Publisher:
Wiley
Soft-Switching PWM Full-Bridge Converters: Topologies, Control, and Design / Edition 1

Soft-Switching PWM Full-Bridge Converters: Topologies, Control, and Design / Edition 1

by Xinbo Ruan

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781118702208
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 05/19/2014
Pages: 248
Product dimensions: 6.90(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Xinbo Ruan Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China

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Table of Contents

About the Author xi

Preface xiii

Acknowledgment xvii

List of Abbreviations xix

1 Topologies and Operating Principles of BasicFull-Bridge Converters 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.1.1 Development Trends in Power Electronics Technology 1

1.1.2 Classification and Requirements of Power ElectronicsConverters 2

1.1.3 Classification and Characterization of dc–dcConverters 3

1.2 Isolated Buck-Derived Converters 4

1.2.1 Forward Converter 4

1.2.2 Push–Pull Converter 7

1.2.3 Half-Bridge Converter 10

1.2.4 Full-Bridge Converter 11

1.2.5 Comparison of Isolated Buck-Derived Converters 12

1.3 Output Rectifier Circuits 14

1.3.1 Half-Wave Rectifier Circuit 14

1.3.2 Full-Wave Rectifier Circuit 15

1.3.3 Full-Bridge Rectifier Circuit 17

1.3.4 Current-Doubler Rectifier Circuit 18

1.4 Basic Operating Principle of Full-Bridge Converters 21

1.4.1 Topologies of Full-Bridge Converters 21

1.4.2 Pulse-Width Modulation Strategies for Full-BridgeConverters 21

1.4.3 Basic Operating Principle of a Full-Bridge Converter witha Full-Wave Rectifier Circuit and a Full-Bridge Rectifier Circuit21

1.4.4 Basic Operating Principle of a Full-Bridge Converter witha Current-Doubler Rectifier Circuit 24

1.5 Summary 32

References 32

2 Theoretical Basis of Soft Switching for PWM Full-BridgeConverters 33

2.1 PWM Strategies for Full-Bridge Converters 33

2.1.1 Basic PWM Strategy 33

2.1.2 Definition of On-Time of Power Switches 36

2.1.3 A Family of PWM Strategies 36

2.2 Two Types of PWM Strategy 38

2.2.1 The Two Diagonal Power Switches Turn Off Simultaneously39

2.2.2 The Two Diagonal Power Switches Turn Off in a StaggeredManner 41

2.3 Classification of Soft-Switching PWM Full-Bridge Converters43

2.4 Summary 44

Reference 44

3 Zero-Voltage-Switching PWM Full-Bridge Converters45

3.1 Topologies and Modulation Strategies of ZVS PWM Full-BridgeConverters 45

3.1.1 Modulation of the Lagging Leg 45

3.1.2 Modulation of the Leading Leg 47

3.1.3 Modulation Strategies of the ZVS PWM Full-BridgeConverters 47

3.2 Operating Principle of ZVS PWM Full-Bridge Converter 49

3.3 ZVS Achievement of Leading and Lagging Legs 54

3.3.1 Condition for Achieving ZVS 54

3.3.2 Condition for Achieving ZVS for the Leading Leg 54

3.3.3 Condition for Achieving ZVS for the Lagging Leg 54

3.4 Secondary Duty Cycle Loss 55

3.5 Commutation of the Rectifier Diodes 55

3.5.1 Full-Bridge Rectifier 56

3.5.2 Full-Wave Rectifier 57

3.6 Simplified Design Procedure and Example 59

3.6.1 Turn Ratio of Transformer 59

3.6.2 Resonant Inductor 59

3.6.3 Output Filter Inductor and Capacitor 60

3.6.4 Power Devices 60

3.6.5 Load Range of ZVS 61

3.7 Experimental Verification 62

3.8 Summary 66

References 66

4 Zero-Voltage-Switching PWM Full-Bridge Converters withAuxiliary-Current-Source Networks 67

4.1 Current-Enhancement Principle 68

4.2 Auxiliary Current-Source Network 69

4.3 Operating Principle of a ZVS PWM Full-Bridge Converter withAuxiliary-Current-Source Network 72

4.4 Conditions for Achieving ZVS in the Lagging Leg 78

4.5 Parameter Design 78

4.5.1 Parameter Selection for the Auxiliary-Current-SourceNetwork 79

4.5.2 Determination of Lr, Cr, and Ic 79

4.5.3 Design Example 80

4.6 Secondary Duty Cycle Loss and Selection of Dead Time for theDrive Signals of the Lagging Leg 81

4.6.1 Secondary Duty Cycle Loss 81

4.6.2 Selection of Dead Time between Drive Signals of theLagging Leg 82

4.6.3 Comparison with Full-Bridge Converter with SaturableInductor 82

4.7 Experimental Verification 85

4.8 Other Auxiliary Current-Source Networks for ZVS PWMFull-Bridge Converters 87

4.8.1 Auxiliary Current-Source Networks with UncontrolledAuxiliary Current Magnitude 87

4.8.2 Auxiliary Current-Source Networks with ControlledAuxiliary Current Magnitude 89

4.8.3 Auxiliary Current-Source Network with Auxiliary CurrentMagnitude Proportional to Primary Duty Cycle 89

4.8.4 Auxiliary Current-Source Network with Auxiliary CurrentMagnitude Adaptive to Load Current 91

4.8.5 Auxiliary Current-Source Networks with Adaptive ResonantInductor Current 97

4.9 Summary 98

References 98

5 Zero-Voltage-and-Zero-Current-Switching PWM Full-BridgeConverters 101

5.1 Modulation Strategies and Topologies of a ZVZCS PWMFull-Bridge Converter 101

5.1.1 Modulation of the Leading Leg 101

5.1.2 Modulation of the Lagging Leg 103

5.1.3 Modulation Strategies of ZVZCS PWM Full-Bridge Converters103

5.1.4 Method for Resetting the Primary Current at Zero State103

5.2 Operating Principle of a ZVZCS PWM Full-Bridge Converter110

5.3 Theoretical Analysis 113

5.3.1 Peak Voltage of the Block Capacitor 113

5.3.2 Achieving ZVS for the Leading Leg 113

5.3.3 Maximum Effective Duty Cycle Deff max 114

5.3.4 Achieving ZCS for the Lagging Leg 114

5.3.5 Voltage Stress of the Lagging Leg 114

5.3.6 Blocking Capacitor 115

5.4 Simplified Design Procedure and Example 115

5.4.1 Transformer Winding-Turns Ratio 115

5.4.2 Calculation of Blocking Capacitance 115

5.4.3 Verification of the Transformer Turns Ratio and BlockingCapacitance 116

5.4.4 Dead Time between the Gate Drive Signals of the LeadingLeg 117

5.5 Experimental Verification 117

5.6 Summary 119

References 120

6 Zero-Voltage-Switching PWM Full-Bridge Converters withClamping Diodes 121

6.1 Introduction 121

6.2 Causes of Voltage Oscillation in the Output Rectifier Diodein ZVS PWM Full-Bridge Converters 122

6.3 Voltage Oscillation Suppression Approach 125

6.3.1 RC Snubber 125

6.3.2 RCD Snubber 125

6.3.3 Active Clamp Circuit 126

6.3.4 Auxiliary Winding of Transformer and Clamping DiodeCircuit 126

6.3.5 Clamping Diode Circuit 127

6.4 Operating Principle of the Tr-Lead-Type ZVS PWM Full-BridgeConverter 128

6.5 Operating Principle of the Tr-Lag-Type ZVS PWM Full-BridgeConverter 133

6.6 Comparisons of Tr-Lead-Type and Tr-Lag-Type ZVS PWMFull-Bridge Converters 138

6.6.1 Clamping Diode Conduction Times 138

6.6.2 Achievement of ZVS 139

6.6.3 Conduction Loss in Zero State 140

6.6.4 Duty Cycle Loss 140

6.6.5 Effect of the Blocking Capacitor 140

6.7 Experimental Verification 143

6.8 Summary 146

References 147

7 Zero-Voltage-Switching PWM Full-Bridge Converters withCurrent Transformers to Reset the Clamping Diode Currents149

7.1 Introduction 149

7.2 Operating Principle of the ZVS PWM Full-Bridge Converterwith Clamping Diodes under Light Load Conditions 150

7.2.1 Case I: 0.5Vin¨MZr1 < ILf (t1)¨MK <Vin¨MZr1 (Referring to Figure 7.2a) 156

7.2.2 Case II: ILf (t1)¨MK < 0.5Vin¨MZr1 (Referringto Figure 7.2b) 156

7.3 Clamping Diode Current-Reset Scheme 158

7.3.1 Reset Voltage Source 158

7.3.2 Implementation of the Reset Voltage Source 160

7.4 Operating Principle of the ZVS PWM Full-Bridge Converterwith Current Transformer 162

7.4.1 Operating Principle under Heavy Load Conditions 162

7.4.2 Operating Principle under Light Load Conditions 167

7.5 Choice of Current Transformer Winding Turns Ratio 173

7.5.1 Clamping Diode Current-Reset Time 173

7.5.2 Output Rectifier Diode Voltage Stress 174

7.5.3 Current Transformer Winding Turns Ratio 174

7.6 Experimental Verification 175

7.7 Summary 179

References 180

8 Zero-Voltage-Switching PWM Full-Bridge Converters withCurrent-Doubler Rectifiers 181

8.1 Operating Principle 182

8.2 Realization of ZVS for the Switches 187

8.3 Design Considerations 188

8.3.1 Transformer Winding Turns Ratio 189

8.3.2 Output Filter Inductance 189

8.3.3 Blocking Capacitor 192

8.4 Experimental Results 193

8.5 Summary 197

References 198

Appendix 199

Bibliography 203

Index 207

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