Soldiers, Statecraft, and History: Coercive Diplomacy and International Order

Soldiers, Statecraft, and History: Coercive Diplomacy and International Order

by James A. Nathan

Paperback(New Edition)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780275976415
Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date: 04/08/2010
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 220
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

JAMES A. NATHAN is Khaled bin Sultan Eminent Scholar and Professor of International Relations at Auburn University. His most recent book is Anatomy of the Cuban Missile Crisis (Greenwood, 2000).

Table of Contents

Preface

Westphalia and the Rise of Modern Diplomacy

Force, Order, and Diplomacy in the Age of Louis XIV

The HeyDay of the Balance of Power: Frederick the Great and the Decline of the Old Regime

The French Revolution: "A Virus of a New and Unknown Kind"

War and Order: The "Juggernaut of War" Meets a "Legitimate" Peace

On Appeasement and Parvenus: Managing the Challenge of New Power

On Coercive Diplomacy: The American Foreign Affairs Experience

Conclusion

What People are Saying About This

Robert L. Gallucci^LDean


…An exceptionally well written and insightful treatment of perhaps the central issue in current American foreign policy debates: the…relationship between national interest, military force, and political influence….The book makes an important and unique contribution to our understanding of the history of the use of military force which can only help us better assess its proper use in the future.

Lawrence J. Korb Vice President Maurice R. Greenberg Chair Director of Studies Counci

In the scholarly, but readable and jargon-free book, James Nathan demonstrates through gripping historical nomenclature that a successful foreign policy requires the deliberate and conscious integration of military force and diplomacy. It is a must-read for students, scholars and practitioners of foreign policy.

Willie Curtis United States Naval Academy

[This book]…offers a uniquely comprehensive study of statecraft and is excellent for civilian universities, the military academies and national war colleges. This book will be essential reading for scholars and all serious students of international affairs.

Philip Brenner^LAmerican University


Professor Nathan's extraordinary ^Itour d'horizon^R of how the debate about force and diplomacy has evolved gives us the necessary starting point for what should be a global debate about the use of coercion….[His] intellectual scope is breathtaking, and he uses it to develop a stunning and clearly written rebuttal to conventional apologies for the use--or threat to use--unrestrained military power.

Richard A. Melanson Professor National Defense University

James Nathan has written a magisterial account of force, order, and diplomacy from the Peace of Westphalia to the war against terrorism. His deft use of Clausewitzian insights show how states that fail to place political limits on their use of violence have repeatedly suffered disaster…. This engaging and sophisticated book will appeal to a wide audience wishing to learn about the necessity of subordinating military force to political purpose.

Robert L. Gallucci Dean

…An exceptionally well written and insightful treatment of perhaps the central issue in current American foreign policy debates: the…relationship between national interest, military force, and political influence….The book makes an important and unique contribution to our understanding of the history of the use of military force which can only help us better assess its proper use in the future.

Charles Tien Associate Professor Hunter College

Nathan has gracefully written a book on coercive power from a historical perspective. Readers will come away with a better understanding of historical events and leading figures that are often referenced but not well understood….A must-read for students and scholars of diplomacy.

Charles Tien^LAssociate Professor^LHunter College


Nathan has gracefully written a book on coercive power from a historical perspective. Readers will come away with a better understanding of historical events and leading figures that are often referenced but not well understood….A must-read for students and scholars of diplomacy.

Bill Maynes^LPresident


The use of force in international relations has sharply divided the American body politic. The Left has argued or hoped that the role of force would sharply decline or even disappear in the age of globalization and post-Cold War politics. The Right, for its part, at times seems to suggest that force alone will secure America's international role as it pushes the United States to downgrade international institutions and eschew international obligations. James A. Nathan offers a balanced, scholarly corrective to either excess and perhaps points the way to a more balanced and constructive U.S. foreign policy in the future.

Lawrence J. Korb^LVice President^LMaurice R. Greenberg Chair^LDirector of Studies Counci


In the scholarly, but readable and jargon-free book, James Nathan demonstrates through gripping historical nomenclature that a successful foreign policy requires the deliberate and conscious integration of military force and diplomacy. It is a must-read for students, scholars and practitioners of foreign policy.

Bill Maynes President

The use of force in international relations has sharply divided the American body politic. The Left has argued or hoped that the role of force would sharply decline or even disappear in the age of globalization and post-Cold War politics. The Right, for its part, at times seems to suggest that force alone will secure America's international role as it pushes the United States to downgrade international institutions and eschew international obligations. James A. Nathan offers a balanced, scholarly corrective to either excess and perhaps points the way to a more balanced and constructive U.S. foreign policy in the future.

Richard A. Melanson^LProfessor^LNational Defense University


James Nathan has written a magisterial account of force, order, and diplomacy from the Peace of Westphalia to the war against terrorism. His deft use of Clausewitzian insights show how states that fail to place political limits on their use of violence have repeatedly suffered disaster…. This engaging and sophisticated book will appeal to a wide audience wishing to learn about the necessity of subordinating military force to political purpose.

Willie Curtis^LUnited States Naval Academy


[This book]…offers a uniquely comprehensive study of statecraft and is excellent for civilian universities, the military academies and national war colleges. This book will be essential reading for scholars and all serious students of international affairs.

Philip Brenner American University

Professor Nathan's extraordinary tour d'horizon of how the debate about force and diplomacy has evolved gives us the necessary starting point for what should be a global debate about the use of coercion….[His] intellectual scope is breathtaking, and he uses it to develop a stunning and clearly written rebuttal to conventional apologies for the use—or threat to use—unrestrained military power.

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