Something in the Water (Peter Shandy Series #9)

Something in the Water (Peter Shandy Series #9)

by Charlotte MacLeod
4.0 2

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Overview

Something in the Water (Peter Shandy Series #9) by Charlotte MacLeod

While vacationing in Maine, Professor Peter Shandy confronts a poisonous potpie
Massachusetts horticulturalist Peter Shandy is famous for his rutabagas, but he comes to Maine with a loftier plant in mind. Specifically, he wants to size up the world-renowned lupines of Frances Rondel, a nonagenarian whose legendary flowers are even more beautiful in life than they are in myth. Shandy is bitterly jealous, but finds a major distraction in the dining room of the country inn where he’s staying. He may grow wretched lupines, but no gardener can solve a murder like Peter Shandy. The corpse belongs to the late Jasper Flodge, a local loudmouth with a toupee and a sizeable gut. Shoveling down the last bites of a chicken potpie, Flodge clutches his chest and falls dead. Suddenly with more to do than stopping to smell the lupines, Shandy must ask himself: Which Maine cook has the bad taste to flavor chicken with cyanide?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781453277478
Publisher: MysteriousPress.com/Open Road
Publication date: 11/06/2012
Series: Peter Shandy Series , #9
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 226
Sales rank: 154,224
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Charlotte MacLeod (1922–2005) was an internationally bestselling author of cozy mysteries. Born in Canada, she moved to Boston as a child, and lived in New England most of her life. After graduating from college, she made a career in advertising, writing copy for the Stop & Shop Supermarket Company before moving on to Boston firm N. H. Miller & Co., where she rose to the rank of vice president. In her spare time, MacLeod wrote short stories, and in 1964 published her first novel, a children’s book called Mystery of the White Knight.  In Rest You Merry (1978), MacLeod introduced Professor Peter Shandy, a horticulturist and amateur sleuth whose adventures she would chronicle for two decades. The Family Vault (1979) marked the first appearance of her other best-known characters: the husband and wife sleuthing team Sarah Kelling and Max Bittersohn, whom she followed until her last novel, The Balloon Man, in 1998. 

Charlotte MacLeod (1922–2005) was an internationally bestselling author of cozy mysteries. Born in Canada, she moved to Boston as a child, and lived in New England most of her life. After graduating from college, she made a career in advertising, writing copy for the Stop & Shop Supermarket Company before moving on to Boston firm N. H. Miller & Co., where she rose to the rank of vice president. In her spare time, MacLeod wrote short stories, and in 1964 published her first novel, a children’s book called Mystery of the White Knight. In Rest You Merry (1978), MacLeod introduced Professor Peter Shandy, a horticulturist and amateur sleuth whose adventures she would chronicle for two decades. The Family Vault (1979) marked the first appearance of her other best-known characters: the husband and wife sleuthing team Sarah Kelling and Max Bittersohn, whom she followed until her last novel, The Balloon Man, in 1998.

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Something in the Water 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
kamas716 More than 1 year ago
Probably the slowest paced of the Shandy novels. It was still well written and the evil mastermind was a bit of a surprise. I did think the last couple of pages seemed a little rushed. Though explained well enough to be clear, it probably could have benefited from another couple of pages of set up for the arrest. My biggest complaint: No Thorkjeld Svenson, my favorite character. The hardcover was well formatted with only a couple of noticeable spelling/grammar mistakes.
SJMusk More than 1 year ago
I can’t express how much I enjoy Charlotte MacLeod’s stories.  She creates characters that invite you into their quiet life while they hunt for who did it.  Her style makes me think of Georgette Heyer’s mysteries and Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple mysteries.