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The Songs of Distant Earth
     

The Songs of Distant Earth

3.9 12
by Arthur C. Clarke
 

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Thalassa was a paradise above the earth. Its beauty and vast resources seduce its inhabitants into a feeling of perfection. But then the Magellan arrives, carrying with it one million refugees from the last mad days of earth. Paradise looks indeed lost....

Overview

Thalassa was a paradise above the earth. Its beauty and vast resources seduce its inhabitants into a feeling of perfection. But then the Magellan arrives, carrying with it one million refugees from the last mad days of earth. Paradise looks indeed lost....

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345322401
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/28/1987
Edition description:
REISSUE
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
599,497
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Arthur C. Clarke has long been considered the greatest science fiction writer of all time and was an international treasure in many other ways, including the fact that an article by him in 1945 led to the invention of satellite technology. Books by Clarke—both fiction and nonfiction—have sold more than one hundred million copies worldwide. He died in 2008.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 16, 1917
Date of Death:
March 19, 2008
Place of Birth:
Minehead, Somerset, England
Place of Death:
Sri Lanka
Education:
1948, King's College, London, first-class honors in Physics and Mathematics

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Songs of Distant Earth 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be not so much science fiction, but, rather a story about how we relate to each other. I don't know about everyone else, but I found it also to be a bittersweet story. It begins with the last spaceship from Earth (before our Sun goes supernova) with the last humans aboard arriving at a 'seed' planet where humans were planted seven hundred years earlier. The story goes on to explore the differences between the Thalassans and these 'strangers from the sky,' before they continue on to their destination planet. Principally, it is the relationship between Loren Lorensen, Lt. Commander of the spaceship Marissa, a beautiful Thalassan who thirsts for knowledge (and Loren) and Brant, her Thalassan 'significant other.' While Clarke writes that the Thalassans say they have done away with Jealousy, Lust and Fidelity in order to better mankind, don't you believe it. I read this book several years ago and I never stop thinking about. It is thoroughly enjoyable and I highly recommend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Quite moving, entirely plausible, thus very readable. Inspiring, unlike the Rama series, which, though very gripping and imaginative, became increasingly depressing and dystopian.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The ideas are awe-inspiring, as Clarke goes to great lengths to ascertain the fate of humanity following the destruction of the solar system, but the buck stops there. There's not much of a story except for kayak trips and love triangles (or should I say, love pentagons). Do yourself a favor and skip this one.