Space Junk: The Dangers of Polluting Earth's Orbit

Space Junk: The Dangers of Polluting Earth's Orbit

by Karen Romano Young

Hardcover

$33.32
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Overview

Scientists have identified at least 100 million pieces of space debris—from paint chips to nonoperational zombie satellites—floating in Earth's orbit. And over 100 tons of those pieces enter Earth's atmosphere each year!



Journey into outer space and learn about the dangers of space junk collisions, how scientists track them, and how space agencies are working to develop new technologies to clean up the space junk. Along the way, you'll hear from the scientists who are working to ensure that outer space remains a safe place to travel and explore. If we don't tackle the space junk problem, it might be impossible to travel into space; it could even trap us on Earth.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781467756006
Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/01/2016
Pages: 64
Sales rank: 1,109,012
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile: 1220L (what's this?)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Karen Romano Young has dived to the bottom of the Pacific Ocean in a tiny submarine, crunched through Arctic ice in an icebreaker, and visited labs, museum workshops, and research institutions across the U.S. to write and draw about science. She was a lead science communications fellow aboard Dr. Robert Ballard's research ship E/V Nautilus.



Karen has written and/or illustrated more than 30 books for children and is the creator of Humanimal Doodles, a science comic. Her nonfiction books include Try This! and Try This Extreme! (National Geographic). Her fiction work includes The Beetle and Me: A Love Story; the graphic novel Doodlebug: a Novel in Doodles; and Hundred Percent. Her next book for Twenty-First Century Books is Whale Quest.



Karen lives with her family in the woods of Bethel, Connecticut. Her next adventure is a stint at Palmer Station, Antarctica, as the recipient of the National Science Foundation's Antarctic Artists and Writers Grant. She has not yet traveled to space.



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