Spies of Mississippi: The True Story of the Spy Network that Tried to Destroy the Civil Rights Movement

Spies of Mississippi: The True Story of the Spy Network that Tried to Destroy the Civil Rights Movement

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Overview

Spies of Mississippi: The True Story of the Spy Network that Tried to Destroy the Civil Rights Movement by Rick Bowers

It was 1956, and the Civil Rights Movement was in Full Swing. Across The Nation, African Americans were Demanding their rights, and the U.S. Supreme Court was ruling in their favor. But a system of segregation rooted in white supremacy had been a way of life for two hundred years in the Deep South, and Mississippi was not changing its ways without a fight. Thus was born a new arm of the state: a secret propaganda, espionage, and dirty tricks agency. It was called the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission, and its mission was simple: to stop racial integration-at all costs.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781426305955
Publisher: National Geographic Society
Publication date: 01/12/2010
Pages: 120
Sales rank: 289,372
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.80(d)
Lexile: NC1290L (what's this?)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Rick Bowers is a journalist, songwriter, and head of creative projects for the AARP. He lives in Washington D.C.

Wade Henderson is the executive director of the Leadership Commission on Civil Rights.

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Spies of Mississippi: The True Story of the Spy Network that Tried to Destroy the Civil Rights Movement 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
real-reader More than 1 year ago
I thought I knew the broad outlines of the civil rights movement - but I never knew the extent the state of MS used spies to vilify, diminish and ruin the lives of private citizens. This book highlights a number of cases where Mississippi tossed aside the bill of rights and used a highly efficient spy network to keep tabs on its own black citizens and others. Why? These 'suspicious' folks had the nerve to try to vote, to go to a public school, to use the bathroom at a gas/bus station, to travel freely, to replace a white man in a factory job. The book introduces the Sovereignty Commission files - now on line at MDAH.org - that copiously details every movement of members of the NAACP and CORE during those fateful summers in the early 60's. The story of Clyde Kennard is extremely painful. Read this book, learn from the past. Morn the loss of potential denied to so many. Do better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The link to the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission files should read http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/sovcom/.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love myself and civil rights, but mostly MYSELF /:-)