ISBN-10:
3540382194
ISBN-13:
9783540382195
Pub. Date:
05/19/2008
Publisher:
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Springer Handbook of Robotics / Edition 1

Springer Handbook of Robotics / Edition 1

by Bruno Siciliano, Oussama Khatib

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Overview

Springer Handbook of Robotics / Edition 1

A new, authoritative and utterly comprehensive reference work on robotics that incorporates new developments, surpassing the narrow scope of other robotics handbooks that focus on industrial applications. Edited by internationally renowned experts.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783540382195
Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Publication date: 05/19/2008
Edition description: 2008
Pages: 1611
Product dimensions: 7.60(w) x 9.53(h) x (d)

About the Author

Bruno Siciliano received his Doctorate degree in Electronic Engineering from the University of Naples, Italy, in 1987. He is Professor of Control and Robotics at University of Naples Federico II. His research focuses on methodologies and technologies in industrial and service robotics including force and visual control, cooperative robots, human-robot interaction, and aerial manipulation. He has co-authored 6 books and over 300 journal papers, conference papers and book chapters. He has delivered over 20 keynote presentations and over 100 colloquia and seminars at institutions around the world. He is a Fellow of IEEE, ASME and IFAC. He is Co-Editor of the Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics (STAR) series and the Springer Handbook of Robotics, which received the PROSE Award for Excellence in Physical Sciences & Mathematics and was also the winner in the category Engineering & Technology. He has served on the Editorial Boards of prestigious journals, as well as Chair or Co-Chair for numerous international conferences. Professor Siciliano is the Past-President of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (RAS). He has been the recipient of several awards, including the IEEE RAS George Saridis Leadership Award in Robotics and Automation and the IEEE RAS Distinguished Service Award.

Oussama Khatib received his Doctorate degree in Electrical Engineering from Sup’Aero, Toulouse, France, in 1980. He is Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. His research focuses on methodologies and technologies in human-centered robotics including humanoid control architectures, human motion synthesis, interactive dynamic simulation, haptics, and human-friendly robot design. He has co-authored over 300 journal papers, conference papers and book chapters. He has delivered over 100 keynote presentations and several hundreds of colloquia and seminars at institutions around the world. He is a Fellow of IEEE. He is Co-Editor of the Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics (STAR) series and the Springer Handbook of Robotics, which received the PROSE Award for Excellence in Physical Sciences & Mathematics and was also the winner in the category Engineering & Technology. He has served on the Editorial Boards of prestigious journals, as well as Chair or Co-Chair for numerous international conferences. Professor Khatib is the President of the International Foundation of Robotics Research. He has been the recipient of several awards, including the IEEE RAS Pioneer Award in Robotics and Automation, the IEEE RAS George Saridis Leadership Award in Robotics and Automation, the IEEE RAS Distinguished Service Award, and the Japan Robot Association (JARA) Award in Research and Development.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Part A ― Robotics Foundations

Kinematics.- Dynamics.- Mechanisms and Actuation.- Sensing and Estimation.- Model Identification.- Motion Planning.- Motion Control.- Force Control.- Redundant Manipulators.- Robots with Flexible Elements.- Robotic Systems Architectures and Programming.- Behavior-Based Systems.- AI Reasoning Methods for Robotics.- Machine Learning

Part B ― Design

Design and Performance Evaluation.- Limbed Structures.- Parallel Mechanisms.- Robot Hands.- Snake-Like and Continuum Robots.- Soft Robots.- Modular Robots.- Biomimetic Robots.- Wheeled Robots.- Underwater Robots.- Flying Robots.- Micro/Nanorobots

Part C ― Sensing and Perception

Force and Tactile Sensing.- Inertial Sensing.- GPS and Odometry.- Sonar Sensing.- Range Sensing.- 3-D Vision.- Object Recognition.- Visual Servoing.- Multisensor Data Fusion

Part D ― Manipulation and Interfaces

Motion for Manipulation Tasks.- Contact Modeling and Manipulation.- Grasping.- Cooperative Manipulation.- Mobility and Manipulation.- Haptics.- Active Manipulation for Perception.- Telerobotics.- Networked Robots

Part E ― Moving in the Environment

World Modeling.- Simultaneous Localization and Mapping.- Motion Planning and Obstacle Avoidance.- Modeling and Control of Legged Robots.- Modeling and Control of Wheeled Mobile Robots.- Modeling and Control of Robots on Rough Terrain.- Modeling and Control of Underwater Robots.- Modeling and Control of Aerial Robots.- Multiple Mobile Robot Systems

Part F ― Robots at Work

Industrial Robotics.- Space Robotics.- Robotics in Agriculture and Forestry.- Robotics in Construction.- Robotics in Hazardous Applications.- Robotics in Mining.- Search and Rescue Robotics.- Robot Surveillance and Security.- Intelligent Vehicles.- Medical Robotics and Computer-Integrated Surgery.- Rehabilitation and Health Care Robotics.- Domestic Robotics.- Robotics Competitions and Challenges

Part G ― Robots and Humans

Humanoids.- Human Motion Reconstruction.- Physical Human-Robot Interaction.- Human-Robot Augmentation.- Cognitive Human-Robot Interaction.- Social Robotics.- Socially Assistive Robotics.- Learning from Humans.- Biologically-Inspired Robotics.- Evolutionary Robotics.- Neurorobotics: From Vision to Action.- Perceptual Robotics.- Robotics for Education.- Roboethics: Social and Ethical Implications

Acknowledgements.- About the Authors.- Subject Index

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Springer Handbook of Robotics 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Siciliano and Khatib have assembled a massive and comprehensive tome on robotics, circa 2008. Sections of the book can be read by a diverse audience of undergraduate and graduate students, researchers and even the general public. Spanning any field associated with the subject. There is considerable maths in the modelling of robots. Often to understand and control an arm. The multiple degrees of freedom of joints are wonderful for dexterity. But these often give an excursion into advanced linear algebra and control systems theory. Several chapters go into the necessary maths. You probably need at least 2 years of undergraduate engineering maths as preparation. The myriad applications in which robots have been deployed is amply surveyed in Part F, Field and Service Robotics. In the household, there is of course the floor cleaning Roomba. A cute little gizmo, but it is not a toy a genuine robot in its own right. The chapter mentioning it also describes an entire genre of competitors mostly lesser known to the public. Another chapter on agriculture and forestry talks about using robots for tasks like harvesting. Usually more successful when the terrain is flat and well defined ie. having only one crop present. While the general case of a robot in hilly, wooded terrain with multiple obstacles and different species of trees is much harder to program. I also ran into something in this chapter from my past. At the University of Western Australia, there was a long running program to devise a robot sheep shearer. It started in the 70s and I met several of its researchers. I lost track of it after 1983, but I'd wondered whatever became of it. The book takes up the thread, explaining that the program took on the name Shear Magic, and was ultimately discontinued because it was never fast enough. But even in failure, this robotic application had a side effect. The demonstration of the technology was used by farmers to browbeat human shearers into moderating their wage claims, by playing off longstanding fears of workers about being replaced by machines. To me, the most interesting section of the entire book concerned mirror neurons. This was a fundamental recent discovery in biology. The relevance to robotics is still perhaps speculative. Several robotics researchers have attempted to use it as inspiration for teaching a robot via its visual input and processing system. This contrasts greatly with the traditional teaching use of rule based formal logic, often involving the predicate calculus. The results described in the text are early but promising. One slight curiosity is the relative deprecating of military applications. These are numerous and scattered throughout various chapters. Covering uses like landmine detectors, or the aerial Predator and its relatives that have seen much recent use in Iraq and Afghanistan for surveillance and attack. But at the top level of the Contents, there is no section on the military. And if you go to the Index, 'military' is absent, while, for example, 'mind reading' gets 2 entries. The downplaying of the military is especially puzzling given the historically prominent role of the US military in funding advanced robotics research.