×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Steal This Double Album
     

Steal This Double Album

5.0 1
by The Coup
 

See All Formats & Editions

Steal This Double Album is the Coup's masterstroke, taking the advances of Genocide and Juice to the next level and coming up with one of the most underappreciated hip-hop albums of the '90s. Down to a duo, the Coup officially becomes a vehicle for Boots Riley's observations, which it mostly was already; still, there's a greater focus simply because of the fact

Overview

Steal This Double Album is the Coup's masterstroke, taking the advances of Genocide and Juice to the next level and coming up with one of the most underappreciated hip-hop albums of the '90s. Down to a duo, the Coup officially becomes a vehicle for Boots Riley's observations, which it mostly was already; still, there's a greater focus simply because of the fact that it's a product of one ambitious vision. Boots' impassioned political rhetoric is still in full-force, but the main strengths of Steal This Double Album are its fleshed-out characters and witty, detailed, image-rich storytelling that would do Slick Rick proud. Its intellectual and emotional depth come from Boots finding the humanity not only in his ideology, but in a much-maligned class of people articulating their frustrations and analyzing the world they live in from both the inside and the outside. His flair for the dramatic reaches its apex on the seven-minute saga "Me and Jesus the Pimp in a '79 Granada Last Night." It's a complex, cinematic story about a young man who loathes his father -- an abusive pimp who eventually beats his mother to death -- but can't help internalizing some of the same behavior. Equally touching is "Underdogs," a heartbreaking account of the everyday reality of poverty. Boots' ironic wit is all over the rest of the record. The dark-humored "Breathing Apparatus" finds a gunshot victim with no health insurance pleading with his friend not to let doctors pull the plug. Elsewhere, the Coup's "Repo Man," from their Genocide and Juice and Steal This Album LPs returns (in the person of Del Tha Funkee Homosapien) on "The Repo Man Sings for You"; and Boots acts out a gleefully provocative fantasy (on record, anyway) with "Piss on Your Grave," which concerns slave owner George Washington. The whole album is strikingly consistent, managing to be smart, funny, touching, and funky all at once; it's nothing short of brilliant. [Like the Coup's first two albums, Steal This Album went out of print rather quickly; it was later reissued as Steal This Double Album

Product Details

Release Date:
08/13/2002
Label:
Foad
UPC:
0804454460027
catalogNumber:
4600
Rank:
100594

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Coup   Primary Artist
Del the Funky Homosapien   Vocals
Carl Green   Saxophone
Elijah Baker   Bass
David Byrd   Guitar
Zack   Background Vocals
Keith McArthur   Bass,Guitar,Keyboards
Fletch   Background Vocals
Jason Moss   Guitar
Michael Aauberg   Synthesizer,Piano,Hammond Organ,Electric Piano,fender rhodes,Piano (Grand)
Jacob Margulis-Kessel   Guitar
Kamilah Bolling   Voices
Jay Bowman   Synthesizer,Guitar
Reginald Brown   Bass,Voices
Tara Montgomery   Background Vocals
Sarah Kaieolani Voynow   Harp
Emily Watson   Voices
Richard Tasby   Trombone
Valerie   Background Vocals
Boots Riley   Synthesizer,Piano
Mike Rinta   Trumpet
Bernard Williams   Guitar,Soloist

Technical Credits

Matt Kelley   Engineer
Michael Aauberg   Producer,Instrumentation
Lev   Producer,Engineer
Boots Riley   Producer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews