The Steel Remains

The Steel Remains

Audiobook(CD - Unabridged CD)

$37.99 $39.99 Save 5% Current price is $37.99, Original price is $39.99. You Save 5%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Friday, September 29 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Overview

The Steel Remains by Richard K. Morgan, Simon Vance

A dark lord will rise. Such is the prophecy that dogs Ringil Eskiath—Gil, for short—a washed-up mercenary and onetime war hero whose cynicism is surpassed only by the speed of his sword. Gil is estranged from his aristocratic family, but when his mother enlists his help in freeing a cousin sold into slavery, Gil sets out to track her down. But it soon becomes apparent that more is at stake than the fate of one young woman. Grim sorceries are awakening in the land. Some speak in whispers of the return of the Aldrain, a race of widely feared, cruel yet beautiful demons. Now Gil and two old comrades are all that stand in the way of a prophecy whose fulfillment will drown an entire world in blood. But with heroes like these, the cure is likely to be worse than the disease.
 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400109630
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 01/01/2009
Series: A Land Fit For Heroes Series , #1
Edition description: Unabridged CD
Product dimensions: 6.50(w) x 5.50(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Richard K. Morgan is the acclaimed author of Thirteen, which won the Arthur C. Clarke Award, Woken Furies, Market Forces, Broken Angels, and Altered Carbon, a New York Times Notable Book that also won the Philip K. Dick Award. Morgan sold the movie rights for Altered Carbon to Joel Silver and Warner Bros. His third book, Market Forces, has also been sold to Warner Bros. and was winner of the John W. Campbell Award. He lives in Scotland.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Steel Remains 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 64 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a terrific read. If you're looking for a noir, tough hero detective story like Altered Carbon (with a complex mystery, steamy sex, etc.), this is your book. If you're looking for a tale of an epic swordsman, dark magic, and ancient rivalries between gods, this is also your book. Morgan has taken the best of his Takeshi Kovacs series and mixed it into a fascinating world that will satisfy fantasy lovers (like me). Highly recommended if you're looking for a book to draw you in and race you to the finish.
2pala More than 1 year ago
Simply the best fantasy I've ever read. If you like dark, human stories that are also "sword and sorcery" and are tired of "heroes and happy endings", this book is for you. And a hint of "magic is simply science beyond our understanding".
harstan More than 1 year ago
Ringil Eskiath, the hero of Gallows Gap, found fame brought notoriety due to his sexual preference, which led to exile from his ashamed aristocratic family as his saving humans from the Scaled Folk is superseded by his being gay. Legally as a degenerate the state should execute him. He remains alive due to his family connections; his heroism; and his speed with the sword that matches the speed of his temper. Angry by the prejudice he faces and the lack of gratitude for risking his life, he has become an out of shape has-been residing in the squalid boondocks Gallows Water where he earns room and board at a dive talking about his glory days and pocket change using his Kiriath sword to battle the mighty mite populace.

His mother Ishil arrives to demand Ringil search for his cousin Sherin, whose husband Bilgest legally sold her into slavery. Reluctantly he returns to Trelayne where he acts like a bull in a pottery shop flaunting his sexual proclivity. He angers Poltar, shaman of the nomadic Skaanak, who wants to dispose of the clan master Egar the Dragonbane for his blasphemous ideas learned in the Kiriath city Yhelteth. The Emperor sends the last Kiriath, Archeth Indamaninarmal, to investigate the destruction of Khangset. She, Ringil and Egar meet as they did once before when they defeated the Scaled Folk, but that seems like a picnic compared to their foe, the Dwenda magical race that ignores the laws of physics when it comes to the time-space continuum.

This character driven sword and sorcery science fiction fantasy focuses on the three heroes, flaws and all, as they prepare for a second adventure of a lifetime. The world is detailed so it seems genuine as a wonderful hyperbole of our country (even with Richard K, Morgan being a Scottish author). Although much of the story line is inner musings and angry diatribes over unfairness, the military battles are exhilarating. From the opening gay encounter, Mr. Morgan provides a deep look at what happens to heroes when they choose to behave differently than the societal expectations of what a champion must be.

Harriet Klausner
brokenarrowjbe More than 1 year ago
Morgan continues to write new and exciting fiction. Great twist on the fantasy theme. Highly recommend this one if you like the thrill of a good read.
CCSchiebel More than 1 year ago
I am a pretty big fan of Morgan's Kovac novels, but unlike some of the others who gave this an unfavorable review because they were used to Morgan doing Sci-Fi (and well I might add), I appreciated what RKM was doing with this fantasy novel. This is a hardboiled style detective novel set in a fantasy world. A few people complain about Ringel's "modern sensibilities" but frankly I think it helps combined these two genre's beautifully. Also, I am not sure, but I also think that "modern sensibilities" may be code speak for, "I hate that the main character was gay". What I have to say to those people is to get over it. The fact that the main protagonist was gay was NOT hidden in the description. If you read it without reading the description, then don't blame the author for your own ignorant stupidity. As far as story goes, Morgan takes a lot of time to set up the atmosphere and I can honestly say there was one twist that I was not expecting. The end however was a little bit of a let down as it does not quite live up to the build up through the story line. In the end, it was pretty apparent that RKM left the ending open on purpose to make a sequel. I don't blame him for that. I just wish the ending to Steel was more satisfying. In the end however, it did leave me greatly anticipating the next novel due to be released in October, "The Cold Commands", and for ONCE I can say that a gay character in a fantasy novel has finally become the main protagonist in a genre that usually delegates them to side kicks and comedy relief. Hurrah!!
Anonymous 4 months ago
The 1st chapter does a nice job of pulling interest. By page 80 something the main character (Ringal) is whining like an immature teen at his close minded father. The story does not weave together well in the end....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So good! Grabs you from the start and keeps you guessing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Readers should be told IN ADVANCE of the gay theme of this novel
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Overall a good sci fi read but I felt that I was dropped in the middle of something at the start and had to founder around for a bit before the story started to come together. I think the paper book would be easier to read than the nook book I was reading having said that I just bought the 2nd book on my nook and cant wait to start it. Mr Morgans reliance on place settings would have worked better if a map of his world would have been included.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fascinating read with incredibly well developed characters, non-stop action, blood, gore, and a terrific otherworld setting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The feel of The Steel Remains did a lot to remind me of Takeshi Kovacs novels. And to some extent this was seen in terms of the plotting being much more precise and well implemented than many other low-fantasy novels. Depicting a gritty and dirty world is the most distinctive characteristic of the setting, and at times the level of self-loathing seen in the characters can seem a bit overtly dramatic. But in this case (and getting to the controversial part) the gay character in a world where any such thought is heretical earns this level of pathos. It is also remarkable in that the character's own personal suffering changes, but is never happily over come or easily assuaged. But, the caveat is that there is a fair (maybe 10 pages?) worth of very explicit sexual encounters. There is no fade to black, and what is depicted is not always of the kindest sort of action. If such things are acceptable than it is definitely worth enjoying this well written book. That said, I would not fault anyone for saying that this is not within their taste.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago