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Step by Step
     

Step by Step

by Diane Wolkstein, Joseph A. Smith (Illustrator)
 

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The world is a very big when you are very small. But that doesn't stop a little ant from leaving home to visit her friend. Step by step she goes:
over a stone,
across a leaf,
under a branch...
until she arrives.

Tiny children, who also travel through a very big world, will share the wonder of this little ant's big adventure, as well as the feeling

Overview

The world is a very big when you are very small. But that doesn't stop a little ant from leaving home to visit her friend. Step by step she goes:
over a stone,
across a leaf,
under a branch...
until she arrives.

Tiny children, who also travel through a very big world, will share the wonder of this little ant's big adventure, as well as the feeling of accomplishment at journey's end.

Diane Wolkstein's engaging story of a delight-filled visit and Jos. A. Smith's richly textured pictures from an ant's point of view create a world that will amaze you — all young adventurers.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Over a stone, across a leaf, under a branch--step by step, a red-sneakered ant wends her way to meet her friend the grasshopper. Together, the two enjoy an outing, then the ant travels home again, step by step, arriving just before dark. Although the story line is slight and the pair's adventures practically nonexistent, Wolkstein's pacing is expert. Here, repetition of the phrase ``step by step'' propels the tale and sets the stage for a rhythmic, reassuring read-aloud. Smith's larger-than-life illustrations provide an ant's-eye view of the world; solid attention to detail and gentle anthropomorphization of the ant and her friend make this, if not a show-stopper, decidedly reader-friendly. Ages 3-up. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
PreS-K-A pointless, circular story that gives an insect's-eye view of the world. A long-legged ant wearing bright red sneakers leaves her dirt hole and walks ``step by step'' over a stone, across a leaf, and over another stone until she meets her friend, a grasshopper. Together they sip some nectar and float around a puddle on a leaf until they capsize. After shaking dry, the ant realizes it's getting late and reverses her route home. Bold, colorful watercolor, pen, and ink paintings lend texture and perspective to the woodland scenes, but fail to breathe life into the characters.-Nancy A. Gifford, Schenectady County Public Library, NY
Mary Harris Veeder
An ant leaves her home and, step-by-step, goes to meet her friend, a grasshopper. They dine and play, and then, step-by-step, the ant returns home. The pictures show the difference the setting sun makes on the landscape as the ant travels homeward. The ant wears sneakers and the grasshopper a baseball cap. Otherwise, they are realistically represented insects--small creatures making their way in a large world. Whether children emphathize with that idea or not, they will remember the sneakers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688103156
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/01/1994
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.31(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.43(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Diane Wolkstein has been teaching, performing, and writing for over thirty-five years. She is the author of numerous award-winning books of folklore, including The Magic Orange Tree, and Other Haitian Folktales and Inanna, Queen of Heaven and Earth: Her Stories and Hymns from Sumer. Known for her meticulous research as well as her great range as a performer, Ms. Wolkstein traveled to Australia three times while preparing this story. She gives workshops on storytelling worldwide and lives in New York City.

In Her Own Words...

"I love stories. They give me strength, Inspiration, courage, and great delight. For thirty years I've told stories at the statue of Hans Christian Andersen in Central Park. I love watching the eyes of my audience light up as they enter stories. Stories let us explore the farthest places in the universe and the deepest recesses of the human heart. They present possibilities. They let us try out different emotions and characters. Stories are treasures which last forever.

"I also enjoy gardening, dancing, swimming, painting, and creating stories with music. My daughter, Rachel Zucker, is a poet, photographer, and the mother of a little boy named Moses."

Jos. A. Smith, illustrator of Hurry! by Jessie Haas, Ogres! Ogres! Ogres!: A Feasting Frenzy from A to Z by Nicholas Heller, and A Creepy Countdown by Charlotte Huck, lives in New York City.

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