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Stones for Ibarra
     

Stones for Ibarra

3.5 6
by Harriet Doerr
 

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Richard and Sara Everton mortgage, sell and borrow, leave friends and country to settle in the Mexican village of Ibarra. They intend to spend the rest of their lives here, in a place neither of them has seen, to speak a language neither of them know. Their dream is to reopen Richard's grandfather's abandoned copper mine.

In a few short months work is advancing in

Overview

Richard and Sara Everton mortgage, sell and borrow, leave friends and country to settle in the Mexican village of Ibarra. They intend to spend the rest of their lives here, in a place neither of them has seen, to speak a language neither of them know. Their dream is to reopen Richard's grandfather's abandoned copper mine.

In a few short months work is advancing in the mine and their home is ready -- then Richard learns he has six years to live.

Richard's determination to make the mine and village prosper matches Sara's effort to deny the diagnosis. While Richard measures time, she rejects its passage.

This novel, Harriet Doerr's first, was written when she was in her seventies. It won the American Book Award.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A novel of genuine power and intelligence, written in an arresting style, amply imbued with atmosphere and meaning."--The Washington Post

"Doerr is a marvelous writer. Her observations are clear sighted, her writing spare but graceful, and she creates telling images. . . . A wonderful book."--Publishers Weekly

"Something of a miracle as novels go, a real act of creation."--Los Angeles Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670192038
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/1984
Pages:
215
Product dimensions:
1.00(w) x 1.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Harriet Doerr (1910-2002) was born in Pasadena, California, and attended Smith College in 1927, but received her B.A. from Stanford University in 1977, where she was accepted into the Creative Writing Program. She was a Stegner Fellow, received the Transatlantic Review Henfield Foundation Award and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Doerr’s first novel, Stones for Ibarra, won the 1984 National Book Award for First Work of Fiction, the Bay Area Book Reviewers Award, the Godal Medal of the Commonwealth Club of California, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Harold D. Vursell Award. Her second novel, Consider This, Señora, was a national bestseller. Doerr’s third and final book, The Tiger in the Grass, was a collection of stories and anecdotal pieces.

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Stones for Ibarra 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
DoranneLongPTMS More than 1 year ago
I was hooked from the first sentence, and intrigued to the very last word! This is an award-winning author opening doors and windows into the depths of American and Mexican lives and cultures.
cbiblioholic More than 1 year ago
This woman is truly an inspiration. Was she really 70 when she wrote her first novel? It makes you think that maybe no one should start writing until you have lived enough to have something profound to say. Anywho about the book. To quote a movie - "It is the perfect blend of sexy and cute". Who comes up with "They have not considered that memories are like corks left out of bottles. They swell. They no longer fit" Or "We have come to live among specters, Sara tells herself. They are not people, but silhouettes sketched on a backdrop to deceive us into thinking that the stage is crowded." Not that is that is wicked writing. Total literary orgy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was not as great as Doerr's other major work (Consider This, Senora) but it was very satisfying. The writing is exceptional and the characters are very vivid. Any comments that the book is a downer miss the point entirely, it's about taking on a new life and acts as a fable about the challenges we all meet. Doerr is a great storyteller and I only wish that she had written more novels.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A relentless succession of tragedies, grimly related.