The Story of Little Black Sambo

The Story of Little Black Sambo

by Helen Bannerman

Paperback

$6.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Thursday, August 29

Overview

A remarkable celebration from the Caldecott Honor-winning artist!

A clever young boy outwits a band of voracious tigers and returns home in triumph to a splendid feast of a yard-high stack of pancakes. The story, penned by Helen Brodie Bannerman for her two daughters in 1889, has captured the imagination of readers around the world and across many generations. But the pictures which accompanied her text were crudely stereotypical and hurtful to many. Caldecott Honor-winning artist Christopher Bing has spent almost fifteen years rediscovering the joy and energy of the original story. He respects that Bannerman was writing in an Indian setting and with Indian animals—after all, there are no tigers in Africa—and faithfully adheres to the original text. However, recognizing that the image of Sambo has been used as a symbol of repression of Africans and African-Americans, Christopher Bing celebrates Sambo as proudly African, a child of beauty and joy, wit and resourcefulness.

In recreating the illusion of an antique, weathered, tiger-clawed storybook filled with exquisitely detailed paintings that draw upon a lush jungle-inspired palette, Christopher Bing's interpretation of Sambo's world seamlessly melds a grand sense of wonder with the minutiae of nature, and a story with history.

Author Biography: Christopher Bing first developed a passion for the story of Little Black Sambo when it was read to him as a child. While studying at the Rhode Island School of Design, he began what has been a twenty-year labor of love of illustrating the work in a manner which would appropriately celebrate and respect both its heritage and its readership. A widely published editiorialartist contributing to many national newspapers and magazines, he lives with his wife and three children in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Helen Bannerman (1862-1946) was born in Scotland. The daughter of a chaplain who was posted to foreign countries, she lived for over thirty years in India. She married a doctor in the Indian Medical Service, and they had two daughters. The Story Of Little Black Sambo was written by Mrs. Bannerman to amuse her young girls during a long train journey and first published in 1899.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781725048874
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 08/10/2018
Pages: 30
Product dimensions: 5.98(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.06(d)
Age Range: 5 - 8 Years

About the Author

Helen Bannerman (1862-1946) was a Scottish author of children's books. She lived much of her life in India, where her husband William Bannerman was an officer in the Indian Medical Service, including 32 years in Madras. This gave her the inspiration for the setting of Little Black Sambo.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Story of Little Black Sambo 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Some people look for anything negative or a reason to holler about racism. Even Huck Finn, a wonderful nonracist story, has received a bum rap. Books were written in the time they are set,and LITTLE BLACK SAMBO is a wonderful story that I've enjoyed since I was a child. I am African American, and I find nothing offensive about this story. READ THIS STORY, ALL PEOPLES, AND ENJOY!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This ebook is a scan of a collorfully illustrated, pre-1910, children's book that actually contains two short stories. The scan must have been edited since the one reviewer who complained OCR errors made the ebook unreadable. There are few such errors now. Except for the first sentence of each story, I did not notice any intrusive errors. Some of the illustrations are not as well located as they would be in the hardcopy, but this ebook still benefits from their inclusion. Unfortunately, illustrations that include a black person are based on stereotypes that, although based on a one-time reality, are now considered unflattering at best. The first tale is "Little Black Sambo," a delightful fantasy about a quick-witted black boy, his loving parents, and what happens to four tigers who originally wanted to eat the boy. The story is now considered politically incorrect if not downright racist, but there is nothing in the text itself that would result in such a judgement. The problem is that people ended up using the name Sambo in a deragotory manner. With more than 50 years of such name use/abuse, it is no wonder that the story is now thought of in the same manner as the name. The second tale in the book is a retelling, for children, of the story of Topsy's childhood from "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Enough said for those familiar with the original. This ebook is a great snapshot of children's literature in the USA circa 1910.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
JudithAR More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading the full history of this wonderful story of a young boy outwitting the tiger.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Little Black Sambo is a small, cute little book and I first read it when I was really young. I checked it out at the library every time that I went there. Then the library told me that their copy was lost or out of print. So I tried to find it at other libraries but I had no luck. It is my favorite book in the whole world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Was the very first book I borrowed from a public library in 1980.It was a story I have never forgotten and it will always be my favorite.
mjmorrison1971 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Probably very non-PC to admit to loving thsi book but I do. It was read to me as a child and I now have read it to mine - the tigers are great and I am still looking for the purple shoes with crimson soles and crimson lining
nexist on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I remember this book from when I was a child. A restaurant on the Oregon coast had named itself "Li' Black Sambo" after this book (not related to the chain Sambo's).This book was available as part of the children's menu (or some such). Driving along the coast with my own children, I spied the new "Lil' Black Sambo" restaurant (the original had burned down some years ago). The restaurant now emphasizes the Tiger aspect (it is a pancake house) in its decorations. I recall it nearly going down in the PC righteousness of the 80s (or so). The current restaurant sells this book, supposedly the only authorized American edition.The book itself is small, being 5.5x4.5 inches. Its artwork is by the author. The story itself is rather banal, having the vacuous trickster morality style of Uncle Remus, but with the lack of agency by the main character that redeems those stories. If I were to take offense to this tale, it is not in the rather silly accusations of racism, but in the fact that Sambo is an anti-hero. He doesn't win because of anything he does, but rather he just happens to be able to take advantage of the situation created by his antagonists. This kind of thing really came to the for in the 1960s & 70s, and I disliked it then also.I am happy to have the book because of the fond memories it evokes of me and my family enjoying a vacation on the coast, not from any intrinsic merit of the actual work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Practically impossible to read this eBook because the scan has never been reviewed and edited. Way too many uncorrected OCR errors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
While The Story of Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman has proven to be a much loved classic by many readers, you should exercise caution when preparing to read it to young children. The storyline is fairly basic ¿ Little Black Sambo is pursued by tigers in the jungle, and in order to appease them, he gives each of them an article of clothing. Then, the tigers end up fighting with each other, and Little Black Sambo goes home and eats pancakes. The plot seems harmless, but it is the negative undertones of the book that create its controversy. The term `sambo¿ carries the heavy weight of controversy itself; during slavery, it was an extremely negative and derogatory term used for African-American slaves, labeling them as shiftless, lazy, listless, and, quite frankly, dumb. This word has carried its controversy ever since the days of slavery, and it is still considered a very offensive term to use toward African-Americans. Because of this, allowing children to read a book where the main character¿s name is Sambo introduces them to this negative term that should not even be in their vocabulary. Doing so runs the risk of having children deem all African-Americans as `sambo¿ without understanding the term, thus creating racial controversy. In addition, the illustrations in the book do not portray African-Americans in a good light; rather, they portray quite barbaric and primitive characters that perpetuate many racial stereotypes. Overall, I suggest holding off on having children read this book until they are old enough to understand concepts such as slavery, racism, and stereotypes.