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The Story of the New England Whalers
     

The Story of the New England Whalers

by John Randolph Spears
 

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The Story of the New England Whalers by John R. Spears was published in New York in 1908 and contains 418 pages. It is a history of the whaling industry from the first settlements in Massachusetts (1651) up to the start of the 20th century (1908).

The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it

Overview

The Story of the New England Whalers by John R. Spears was published in New York in 1908 and contains 418 pages. It is a history of the whaling industry from the first settlements in Massachusetts (1651) up to the start of the 20th century (1908).

The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable. This did not involve changing the substance of the text.

Contents:

Samuel Mulford, Alongshore Whaler ---- Told of the Red Indian Whalers ---- Early Days on Nantucket ---- The Minor Colonial Ports ---- Nantucket in the War of the Revolution ---- A Long Period of Depression ---- Adventures of the Explorers ---- Whales as the Whalers Knew Them ---- Harpoons, Lances, Guns, and Boats ---- Sketches Afloat with the Whalers ---- Work of the Fighting Whales ---- Whaling as a Business Enterprise ---- The Mutineers and Slavers ---- Tales of Whalers in the Civil War ---- In the Later Days.

Excerpts:

......It is said that the Right whale received its name through the custom of the early European whalers in speaking of it as the right kind to capture. The Sperm whales were not pursued in the early days, apparently. Whales that produce plently of oil and bone were the "right" whales to capture. In time. however. it was observed that there were several kinds of oil and bone whales. The early whaler explorers who went hunting along the polar ice found one that they named the bow-head, from the shape of the head as seen above water. Another whale was named the Humpback because of the shape of its back. It was noted that the humpback had folds of skin under its chin, and that its fins were of extraordinary length.......

...."Like all inhabitants of the sea, whales are affected by the tides, being most numerous at the full and change of the moon, beginning to appear three days before and disappearing entirely three days after the change. Often this will go on for months with the utmost regularity, unless some great change in the ice takes place. No doubt whales are seen and often taken during anytime of the tides; but if a herd is hunted systematically, and they are attached to a particular feeding bank, this is their usual habit. Neither can this peculiarity in their habits be easily accounted for; their food is as abundant during the neap as it is in the spring tides."

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012648679
Publisher:
Digital Text Publishing Company
Publication date:
04/07/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
418
File size:
181 KB

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