Strega Nona

Strega Nona

Hardcover(Reissue)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780671662837
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date: 08/01/1975
Series: A Strega Nona Book Series
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 45,105
Product dimensions: 8.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile: AD880L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Tomie dePaola is one of the most popular children’s book authors and illustrators of our time and the winner of the 2011 Children’s Literature Legacy Award for “significant and lasting contribution to children’s literature,” among other lifetime achievement awards. A Newbery Honor winner, he has written and illustrated a number of books, including Caldecott Honor book Strega Nona and its companions, as well as Oliver Button Is a Sissy; The Legend of Old Befana; The Clown of God; Michael Bird-Boy; Andy, That’s My Name; and Quiet. A native of Connecticut, Mr. dePaola studied at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and now lives in New London, New Hampshire. Visit him online at Tomie.com and TomiesBlog.Blogspot.com.

Tomie dePaola is one of the most popular children’s book authors and illustrators of our time and the winner of the 2011 Children’s Literature Legacy Award for “significant and lasting contribution to children’s literature,” among other lifetime achievement awards. A Newbery Honor winner, he has written and illustrated a number of books, including Caldecott Honor book Strega Nona and its companions, as well as Oliver Button Is a Sissy; The Legend of Old Befana; The Clown of God; Michael Bird-Boy; Andy, That’s My Name; and Quiet. A native of Connecticut, Mr. dePaola studied at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and now lives in New London, New Hampshire. Visit him online at Tomie.com and TomiesBlog.Blogspot.com.

Hometown:

Connecticut and New Hampshire

Date of Birth:

September 15, 1935

Place of Birth:

Meriden, CT

Customer Reviews

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Strega Nona 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 65 reviews.
Firestar51 More than 1 year ago
A good story for young children - entertaining and an easy opener for discussing one needing to take responsibility for the actions one takes. Set in easy to understand terms so even very young readers [4 or 5 yrs old]are able to see what happens when you do something you are told NOT to do... A favorite in our family with my 5 yr.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like strega n. Mees her match but this is good
Olivia-the-Great More than 1 year ago
Strega Nona By Tomie de Paola The people whisper about Strega Nona because she has a magic pot. Anthony made pasta for the people in the town. Anthony had to eat all the pasta all night long because he made a big mess. I will give it five stars. I love this book because Anthony had to eat all the pasta he made with the magic pot. It is good, awesome and great. I think moms, dads, kids, friends and family will like this book. I would recommend this book to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book! My 4 year old enjoyed it as much as I did. Love the music with the narration and the illustrations are beautiful. This is a book all ages can enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My teacher read it i love it!!! I love tomie de polo check out the art lessan by tomie de polo.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My st udent, love this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My favorite Tomie dePaola--great story, very appealing illustrations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Strega Nona is a wonderul book that allows children to peek into the costumes of the Italian culture. The books are engaging and children enjoy the fun illustrations. The strega non books also allow children to learn a few Italian words. I really enjoy the Strega Nona series and I highly recommend Strega Nona books to parents, students and fellow teachers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. I've read it to many of my students when they came to the school library. The pictures are wonderful. BUT, why does it cost more as an ebook than the hardcover???
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have loved strega nona ever since i was little and now im twelve and i am sick in bed with a fever and i cant wait to read it one again
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a family classic for us, and we give it to all newborns in board book format. It's a perfect read-aloud book with a good moral, but also with a compassionate message.
michie8702 More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite childrens books. I had it when I was little and I'm planning on reading it to my children. I still remember that magic pasta pot! :)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Stega Nona or the old witch who everyone talked about in the town, went to see her for anything from an headache, to finding a husband, and getting off warts. She was the witch of the town that solved everyones problems. But Stega Nona was getting old and needed some help. So Big Anthony came to work for Strega Nona. He had to 'sweep the house and wash the dishes. You must weed the garden and pick the vegetables. You must feed the goat and milk her. Amd you must fetch the water. For this i will give you three coins and a place to sleep and food to eat.' So it was a deal, Big Anthony went to work for Strega Nona. Then one day while doing his chores he hears Strega Nona sing to her pasta pot. Then all of a sudden the pot began to make pasta like magic. Will Big Anthony use the pasta pot for himself? Will he do the spell right? Will he ever get it to stop? Read and you will find out. This book is a delight to read. I think that it is good for students because it helps them learn about what is not theirs to use. this book is good for second grade Tomie DePaola lived in Connecticu and studied at Pratt Instutue in Brooklyn, NY. He now lives in New Hampshire. dePaola, Tomie. SRTEGA NONA. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1975.
Stephanyk on LibraryThing 23 days ago
This book is a Caldecott Honor Book that is appropriate for the grades pre-k through third. The book is filled with pictures and is not too long. The story is about Strega Nona, a witch who takes care of her town with magic. Strega Nona is getting old and so she decides to hire Big Anthony to take care of her house work. Her only rule is that he must not touch the pasta pot. One day Big Anthony sees Strega Nona use the pasta pot to make dinner. He brags to the town and shows off the pasta pot when she is out of town but he does not know how to stop the pot from making pasta. At the end, as a punishment Strega Nona makes him eat all the pasta out of the town. Uses in the classroom:-Discuss the moral of the story which is that we shouldn't touch things that we are told not to.- Have children make a text to world connection. Have them discuss a time when they touched something they were not supposed to and got in trouble.-As a fun activity I would give children a picture of a pot and have them draw a food that the pot will make. Something that they would never get sick of.
shillson on LibraryThing 23 days ago
In this retelling of an old tale, Strega Nona has magical powers and a magical pot. Strega Nona, which means Grandma Witch, can cure headaches, help girls get husbands, and even get rid of warts. Now that Stega Nona is getting older she requires some help around her house and hires a young boy named Big Anthony. One evening while doing his chores, Big Anthongy overhears Strega Nona singing to a pot and sees it magically make pasta. Big Anthony, having thought that he saw and heard the magical spell, tries to give it a shot for himself. However, he had missed the part where Strega Nona blew the pot a kiss and now the pot won't stop making pasta. At first the townspeople are thrilled to see all of the pasta but when it takes over, the entire village begins to worry. Fortunately, Strega Nona is able to save the day by blowing the pot a kiss and stopping it from making any more pasta. The townspeople call to have Big Anthony strung up, but Strega Nona suggests that the punishment fit the crime and tells Big Anthony to eat up all the pasta. A picture of a very full Big Anthony is pictured at the end of the story. There is no mention or citation of the original source for the folktale. The plot is simple and direct and is sure to be enjoyed by students in grades K-3. The illustrations are warm and there is plenty of humor to attract children and adults alike.
Jennifer_Brown on LibraryThing 23 days ago
I loved the magic pot of pasta!!!! The kids also love this book
ababe92 on LibraryThing 23 days ago
This book has great descriptive pictures, and it was written very well. It is about a boy and how he does not listen to Strega nona. By not listening something really bad happens and he has to deal with the consequences by himself. I recommend this book to any teacher, it is just a funny book to read to children.
KaleyHarper on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Summary:Strega Nona, is an old witch that can cure all the people in her village. Strega Nona needs help around the house, so she advertises for a helper. Big Anthony gets the job and finds her magic pot. He runs to tell the townspeople that he has found a pot that will make sure no one goes hungry, but they turn him away. To prove his point, he says the magic words and the pot start producing pasta. Unfortunately, he forgets to blow the 3 kisses afterwards and the pot continues to make the pasta. After it makes it into town, Strega Nona commands the pot to stop making pasta, and tells Big Anthony, his punishment is to eat all the pasta.Personal:I liked this book because of the meaning behind the story. If you do something wrong, you must face the consequences and learn from your mistakes.Classroom:I would have the students write about a time when they didn't listen to their parents and paid the consequence for it.I would also make it a pasta day. We would have pasta for lunch and talk about pasta, while on an Italian themed lesson plan.
rmbowers on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Strega Nona is a wonderful folk-tale about a magic pasta pot. Big Anthony thinks he has discovered Strega Nona's secret when he sees the pasta pot making pasta on its own, but as he soon finds out, there is more to the magical pasta pot than he realizes! This is a darling book filled with Italian words and culture and of course PASTA!
mrcmyoung on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Big Anthony almost covers his village with pasta when he uses a spell on Strega Nona's magic pasta pot that he doesn't understand. Good, witchy Italian fun.
sjordet on LibraryThing 23 days ago
"Strega Nona" is a classic story by Tomie dePaola. Strega Nona (which means "Grandma Witch") has a magical touch that can cure things and make things happen. When Strega Nona puts up an advertisement for help with maintaining her house and garden, Big Anthony responds to the job offer. While working one afternoon, Big Anthony witnesses something magical - Strega Nona made an empty pot fill with pasta. Big Anthony goes to town to brag to people about the pasta pot and tells them that he is going to show them it one day. Big Anthony has the perfect opportunity to live up to his words when Strega Nona goes to visit her friend. He makes the pot fill with pasta and he feeds everyone in the town. His newfound hero status does not last as the pasta pot boils over and pasta begins to take over the city. Strega Nona returns home just in time to stop the pasta by giving the pot three kisses (something Big Anthony had not witnessed her do before). While the town called for Big Anthony to be strung up, Strega Nona proposed a different punishment - he had to eat all the pasta himself."Strega Nona" is a great story for teaching children about the importance of trust and responsibility. It shows that there are consequences to betraying someone's trust and not doing what you are supposed to do. The illustrations are wonderful and the story is unique.
stgayde on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Tomie dePaola's Strega Nona is soon to be a family favorite. An original folk-tale inspired by classical Italian folk-tales, Strega Nona follows a Big Anthony as he comes to work for the beloved town witch, Strega Nona. Strega Nona is renowned in her town for being able to cure headache, help single women find husbands and ridding people of warts but no one knows of her secret pasta pot. It is Big Anthony's job to keep house for the aging Strega Nona. One day while going about his chores, Big Anthony finds the old witch singing to a large pot. When finished with her song, the most delicious smelling pasta begins to flow from it. Big Anthony was so excited to share the news. Soon the opportunity came and when Strega Nona left the town to visit her friend, Strega Amelia, Big Anthony invited everyone to witness the magic of the pot and enjoy the wonderful pasta. Pasta flowed and the people of the town enjoyed a wonderful feast. Big Anthony was sure he knew how to stop the pasta from flowing but unfortunately had not stuck around to see the final step: blowing three Italian kisses. Thus, the pasta continued to flow and soon took over the city. Just then Strega Nona returned, turned the magic pasta pot off but refused to take care of the mess of pasta herself. Instead, she left it to Big Anthony who had so wanted to enjoy the pasta himself. You can only imagine the stomach ache he must have by the end of this comical tale!
aflanig1 on LibraryThing 26 days ago
Great story about how your actions have consequences.
lpeal on LibraryThing 26 days ago
This is about a lady named Stega Nona who has a magic pot. A boy name Anothony comes to live with her. He helps her to do the house work ans in return he gets a house to stay in. But, she said he must never touch the pot. One day he saw her say a few words over the pot and pasta started coming out of it. He thought he could do it but did not see all she did to the pot. So he took it into town and said the words and it worked but it did not stop. It was covering the town. Finally Stega Nona came and got it to stop. This was a very funy book that you could use when you are talking about doing that right thing even when no one is looking.
amandawebster on LibraryThing 26 days ago
A delightful story about an elderly woman who likes to help out her fellow villagers. When Strega Nona leaves, Big Anthony mischievously uses her magic pasta pot, but does not know how to turn it off. He ends up flooding the town with pasta, and must eat it all as a punishment.