Sula

Sula

by Toni Morrison
3.9 110

Hardcover

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Sula 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 110 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The novel Sula was very interesting and a pleasure to read. I was given the novel to read by my English teacher in the start of november. My teacher explained the concept of the novel and my first thought was that the novel would be another boring and drawn out book that the teachers love to give us. My teacher went on and on about how it would be a great read, little did I know how she was so wrong; the book was not a great read it was a new experience. Toni Morrison, the author of Sula, grabbed my attention with the first sentence in which she explained the reason behind ¿the bottom¿. Morrison unique style and characters kept me glued to the book. Morrison¿s ability to create a world of both beauty and corruption was amazing. She accomplishes what most authors, I believe, can not. She makes everything real; she shows that the world isn¿t as black and white as people portray it to be. Her characters have realistic qualities; they show that a person is never truly evil or good. Morrison¿s language is another great factor to this masterpiece of a novel. Morrison has a way of making a horrible event or action into beautiful poetic writing. This novel is not only interesting to read but a great tool for teaching. The novel introduces students to different styles of writing. It is also a great story to analyze; almost everything Morrison writes can be dissected and pulled apart to find a true meaning or idea. The novel maybe a little raunchy and surreal but it is a great book for high school students. This Novel deserves nothing less than five star rating on my scale.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you're going to criticize someone's work. Do it without spelling errors. It's THEN not THAN. This book is a bit confusing since each chapter changes from the story of one person, to someone else's story. But all the characters resided in one town Bottom. Nobody in the Bottom understood Sula. She was neither shown nor given any love, nor was she taught how to express love. She was a very realistic character whom you could relate to. Confused, her inner innocence was pitying as well as sympathizing. Toni Morrison's Sula is a very realistic and powerful novel, with plenty of imagery and details for readers with a vivid imagination and true understanding of literature. I definately recomend it. :}
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I began reading Sula, Morrison's seemingly overuse of color adjectives caught my eye. At first I thought she was merely a 'colorful' and descriptive writer by nature, but as the novel progressed, I realized it was done by intention. The following are examples of Morrison¿s ¿overuse¿ of color adjectives. - '...the purity and the whiteness of his own birth' (3) - '¿the lumpy whiteness of rice, the quivering blood tomatoes, the grayish-brown meat' (8) - '...that the white, the red and the brown would stay' (8) -'he was frightened of the voice in the apple-green suit¿' (9) -'he was standing by a low red building¿' (11) -'he saw a grave black face¿' (13) -'¿his eyes travel over the pale yellow woman' (20) -'...in the city where the red shutters glowed' (20) -'...soldiers still in their ****-colored uniforms' (21) -'...and turned for compassion to the gray eyes' (21) -'...at the salmon-colored face of the conductor' (21) -'¿her eyes fastened on the thick velvet collar' (23) -¿¿on the door hung a black crepe wreath with a purple ribbon' (24) -'¿a woman in a yellow dress...' (25) -'...and a canary-yellow dress¿' (25) All of these examples occur within the first twenty-five pages of the novel. Clearly, Morrison is making a point. She¿s emphasizing how significant color is in a minority's life. For me, a middle-class white male, color is not a day-to-day issue and therefore, I don't give much attention to it. When I look at objects, rarely do I concern myself with its color. This is why I enjoyed Morrison¿s novel. It exposes her readers to a sampling of what life is like in a minority's world where color is always an issue. Overall, Morrison¿s racial awareness is prevalent throughout Sula, making it a very solid and wholesome novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was without a doubt her best peice of work. I have read beloved, tar baby, jazz, and pardise but Sula captured my eye like the others could not. It is the type of book that maybe hard to understand in the start but the way she writes by the end of the story she has you thinking 'it all makes sense now' two thumbs way up to Miss.Toni Morrison
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book talks about friendship,love,betrayal,and family. There is a place called the Bottom. African American lives there. It is a place where Two completely different girls called Sula and Nel become friends. Nel came from stable house where her mother Helen is strict on everything. She teach her daughter Nel always to be smart and have manners and to be neat which Mel finds it as a lot of pressure on her to be perfect. On the other hand, Sula comes from dysfunctional family. Her mom Hannah is know as a whore in the town Medallion. Her grandmother Eva is a determined woman who will do anything to survive. Sula grows up looking at her mom bring different men in to the house to have intimate with them. Sula and Nel are two little girls who try to run away from their family. They are two opposite maginats that attracts each other. They become best friends and start talking about boys and sexual desires . The incident that happens a little boy called Chicken Little shows their personalities. When they reach their teen years, Nel marries Jude. Sula attends the weeding and leaves the town after the wedding. She comes back after couple of years from what she calls it college. She is now an educated and classy woman. She thinks that she does not need to get marry or have children. It is emotional when SUla and Nel reunites. These two women feel incomplete without each other. The bottom people are not happy about sula's return because she is different than them. One thing SUla learns from her mother is sex is for pleasure and it should be done more frequently. therefore, Sula starts to sleep with anyone she desires(including married men) for pleasure. She later sleeps with Nel husband Jude which was the boiling point for their friendship. Sula does not do that in order to hurt her friend but to pleasure herself. These two friends use to share boyfriends when they were young so SUla thinks that it is ok to share Mel's husband too. When SUla tells Nel that she never even loves jude when Nel goes to Sula house after healing sula is sick, NEl becomes very angry and leave the house promising she will never see her again. After couple of weeks, Sula dies regretting what she does to her best friend from all the things she did. Toni Morrison challenge our imagination by telling us how Sula feels after death. Sula says dying does not hurt at all. She cannot wait to tell Nel how dying feels like.In the bottom, there is a holiday called national suicide day invented by SHadrack,town's mad man. I just reviewed the booking using the theme friendship. The book contains important theme such as love,hate,death, and friendship. I hope I did not tell you everything about the book :) enjoy!
TSC More than 1 year ago
I am astonished by these negative reviews. This is the book that introduced me to Toni Morrison, decades ago, and I will be eternally grateful. Maybe these reviews are written by Oprah fans who are not use to thoughtful, challenging (although really, it's an easy read) great literature. This book is close to perfect - the characters are three dimensional, the story is original yet oddly familiar, and the ending is a revelation. I could not possibly pick a "favorite book," but if I were forced to, Sula would absolutely be a contender.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Chancie More than 1 year ago
Interesting story and well-written. Worth a read.
TulaneGirl More than 1 year ago
This is the story of Nel and Sula two girls from the same place but from different worlds. Nel's family is pretty conservative and observes social norms to a T. Sula's family is more hedonistic. Still these two girls bond together until fateful day when the girls are playing with "Chicken Little," a small boy in the neighborhood and he accidentally drowns. Sula and Nel freak and decide not to tell anyone about their involvement in the boys death. This pact bonds them in a way, but it also drives a wedge between them. They drift apart and Sula eventually leaves town. Ten years later, Sula returns with disastrous results. It wasn't my favorite Toni Morrison novel, but the story was engaging. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Toni Morrison is one of the world's best living writers. Reading her works is a learning experience every time.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sad story, yet the norm in areas of poverty. The need for love , no matter the cost, no matter one's race, or in what time or place.
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Lyn Dukes More than 1 year ago
Story-telling flow feels like Fried Green Tomatoes. Although told as an early African American tale, Sula is truly a story of friendship during early American culture.
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