Summa Contra Gentiles, 3:I: Book 3: Providence, Part I / Edition 1

Summa Contra Gentiles, 3:I: Book 3: Providence, Part I / Edition 1

ISBN-10:
0268016860
ISBN-13:
9780268016869
Pub. Date:
01/01/1975
Publisher:
University of Notre Dame Press
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Overview

Summa Contra Gentiles, 3:I: Book 3: Providence, Part I / Edition 1

The Summa Contra Gentiles is not merely the only complete summary of Christian doctrine that St. Thomas has written, but also a creative and even revolutionary work of Christian apologetics composed at the precise moment when Christian thought needed to be intellectually creative in order to master and assimilate the intelligence and wisdom of the Greeks and the Arabs. In the Summa Aquinas works to save and purify the thought of the Greeks and the Arabs in the higher light of Christian Revelation, confident that all that had been rational in the ancient philosophers and their followers would become more rational within Christianity. This exposition and defense of divine truth has two main parts: the consideration of that truth that faith professes and reason investigates, and the consideration of the truth that faith professes and reason is not competent to investigate. The exposition of truths accessible to natural reason occupies Aquinas in the first three books of the Summa. His method is to bring forward demonstrative and probable arguments, some of which are drawn from the philosophers, to convince the skeptic. In the fourth book of the Summa St. Thomas appeals to the authority of the Sacred Scripture for those divine truths that surpass the capacity of reason. The present volume is the first part of a treatise on the hierarchy of creation, the divine providence over all things, and man's relation to God. Book 1 of the Summa deals with God; Book 2, Creation; and Book 4, Salvation.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780268016869
Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press
Publication date: 01/01/1975
Series: Summa Contra Gentiles Ser.
Edition description: 1
Pages: 280
Sales rank: 1,134,526
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

PART I Chapters 1-83
Introduction 15(8)
Bibliography 23(8)
I St. Thomas Aquinas 23(1)
II The sources 23(2)
III Secondary studies 25(2)
IV Studies on the end of man and the vision of God 27(4)
1. Prologue
31(3)
2. How every agent acts for an end
34(4)
3. That every agent acts for a good
38(3)
4. That evil in things is not intended
41(2)
5. Arguments which seem to prove that evil is not apart from intention
43(1)
6. Answers to these arguments
44(4)
7. That evil is not an essence
48(2)
8. Arguments which seem to prove that evil is a nature or some real thing
50(1)
9. Answers to these arguments
51(4)
10. That good is the cause of evil
55(6)
11. That evil is based on the good
61(2)
12. That evil does not wholly destroy good
63(3)
13. That evil has a cause of some sort
66(1)
14. That evil is an accidental cause
67(1)
15. That there is no highest evil
68(2)
16. That the end of everything is a good
70(1)
17. That all things are ordered to one end Who is God
71(3)
18. How God is the end of all things
74(1)
19. That all things tend to become like God
75(2)
20. How things imitate divine goodness
77(4)
21. That things naturally tend to become like God inasmuch as He is a cause
81(2)
22. How things are ordered to their ends in various ways
83(5)
23. That the motion of the heavens comes from an intellectual principle
88(5)
24. How even beings devoid of knowledge seek the good
93(4)
25. That to understand God is the end of every intellectual substance
97(6)
26. Whether felicity consists in a will act
103(7)
27. That human felicity does not consist in pleasures of the flesh
110(3)
28. That felicity does not consist in honors
113(2)
29. That man's felicity does not consist in glory
115(1)
30. That man's felicity does not consist in riches
116(1)
31. That felicity does not consist in worldly power
117(2)
32. That felicity does not consist in goods of the body
119(1)
33. That human felicity does not lie in the senses
119(1)
34. That man's ultimate felicity does not lie in acts of the moral virtues
120(2)
35. That ultimate felicity does not lie in the act of prudence
122(1)
36. That felicity does not consist in the operation of art
123(1)
37. That the ultimate felicity of man consists in the contemplation of God
123(2)
38. That human felicity does not consist in the knowledge of God which is generally possessed by most men
125(2)
39. That human felicity does not consist in the knowledge of God gained through demonstration
127(3)
40. Human felicity does not consist in the knowledge of God which is through faith
130(2)
41. Whether in this life man is able to understand separate substances through the study and investigation of the speculative sciences
132(6)
42. That we cannot in this life understand separate substances in the way that Alexander claimed
138(5)
43. That we cannot in this life understand separate substances in the way that Averroes claimed
143(5)
44. That man's ultimate felicity does not consist in the kind of knowledge of separate substances that the foregoing opinions assume
148(3)
45. That in this life we cannot understand separate substances
151(3)
46. That the soul does not understand itself through itself in this life
154(4)
47. That in this life we cannot see God through His essence
158(4)
48. That man's ultimate felicity does not come in this life
162(5)
49. That separate substances do not see God in His essence by knowing Him through their essence
167(5)
50. That the natural desire of separate substances does not come to rest in the natural knowledge which they have of God
172(3)
51. How God may be seen in His essence
175(2)
52. That no created substance can, by its own natural power, attain the vision of God in His essence
177(2)
53. That the created intellect needs an influx of divine light in order to see God through His essence
179(4)
54. Arguments by which it seems to be proved that God cannot be seen in His essence, and the answers to them
183(3)
55. That the created intellect does not comprehend the divine substance
186(2)
56. That no created intellect while seeing God sees all that can be seen in Him
188(3)
57. That every intellect, whatever its level, can be a participant in the divine vision
191(2)
58. That one being is able to see God more perfectly than another
193(2)
59. How those who see the divine substance may see all things
195(4)
60. That those who see God see all things in Him at once
199(1)
61. That through the vision of God one becomes a partaker of eternal life
200(2)
62. That those who see God will see Him perpetually
202(4)
63. How man's every desire is fulfilled in that ultimate felicity
206(3)
64. That God governs things by His providence
209(5)
65. That God preserves things in being
214(4)
66. That nothing gives being except in so far as it acts by divine power
218(2)
67. That God is the cause of operation for all things that operate
220(3)
68. That God is everywhere
223(3)
69. On the opinion of those who take away proper actions from natural things
226(9)
70. How the same effect is from God and from a natural agent
235(2)
71. That divine providence does not entirely exclude evil from things
237(5)
72. That divine providence does not exclude contingency from things
242(2)
73. That divine providence does not exclude freedom of choice
244(2)
74. That divine providence does not exclude fortune and chance
246(2)
75. That God's providence applies to contingent singulars
248(5)
76. That God's providence applies immediately to all singulars
253(5)
77. That the execution of divine providence is accomplished by means of secondary causes
258(2)
78. That other creatures are ruled by God by means of intellectual creatures
260(3)
79. That lower intellectual substances are ruled by higher ones
263(1)
80. On the ordering of the angels among themselves
264(8)
81. On the ordering of men among themselves and to other things
272(2)
82. That lower bodies are ruled by God through celestial bodies
274(3)
83. Epilogue to the preceding chapters
277

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