Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy

Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy

by Theodore Beale
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Overview

Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy by Theodore Beale

Do Elves Have Souls?

In a medieval fantasy world in which the realm of man is dominated by a rich and powerful Church, the Most Sanctified Charity IV decides the time is ripe to make a conclusive inquiry into the matter. If, in his infallible wisdom, he determines that elves do have immortal souls, then the Church will be obliged to bring the Holy Word of the Immaculate to them. But if he decides they do not, there will be holy war.

Powerful factions line up on both sides of the debate.

War-hungry magnates cast greedy eyes at the ancient wealth of the elven kingdoms and pray for a declaration that elves are little more than animals. And there are men who are willing to do more than merely pray.

The delegation sent to the High King of the Elves is led by two great theologians, brilliant philosophers who champion opposite sides of the great debate. And in the Sanctiff's own stead, he sends the young nobleman,

Marcus Valerius.

Marcus Valerius is a rising scholar in the Church,

talented, fearless, and devout. But he is inexperienced in the ways of the world. Nothing in his life has prepared him for the beauty of the elves—or the monumental betrayal into which he rides.

***

Theodore Beale has published decidedly Christian speculative fiction with the decidedly secular publisher,

Pocket Books. He is a game designer, a technologist, a one-time techno band member, and, under the name Vox Day,

an occasionally controversial political columnist.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780982104927
Publisher: Marcher Lord Press
Publication date: 10/01/2008
Pages: 328
Product dimensions: 5.62(w) x 8.48(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Theodore Beale has published decidedly Christian speculative fiction with the decidedly secular publisher, Pocket Books. He is a game designer, a technologist, a one-time techno band member, and, under the name Vox Day, an occasionally controversial political columnist.

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Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
harstan More than 1 year ago
Amorran Church noble scholar Marcus Valerius is part of a delegation traveling from the Republic to Elebrion to end the heated argument between church scholars whether elves have souls. The delegates know how complex the issue will prove without the threat of a holy war lingering depending on their decision, but each plans to do the right thing religiously regardless. On the trek to the kingdom of the elves, Marcus becomes friends with the scornful Bishop Claudo and Father Aestus, and especially his new dwarf bodyguard. He also enjoys his time spent with the elf accompanying the delegation. In Elebrion, the monarch King Caerwyn throws a welcoming gala, but Marcus soon uncovers a seditious betrayal as he thinks of his Uncle Magnus' warning before he set forth on the trek. This is a terrific fantasy that uses the premise of Anatole France's Penguin Island in a Tolkien like Holy Roman Empire. The story line is mostly told from the viewpoint of the young brilliant yet naive scholar as he learns so much about life and faith in the light of betrayal yet keeps his hope and belief high. Fans will enjoy Marcus' adventures in the kingdom of the elves. Harriet Klausner
Callalily More than 1 year ago
Theodore Beale¿s Summa Elevetica is a guy book. It¿s stuffed with manly men fighting gory battles, braving supernatural beasts, and recounting past glories. The women are lithe and lovely and mostly in the background. Even though it takes place in an alternate history, the overall tone is Ancient Rome meets the Age of Chivalry.

Or perhaps Tolkien meets the Inquisition. In Beale¿s world, the Roman Catholic Church still rules the world, and Rome never fell. At least that¿s how I saw the gladiators and slaves, politics, and Latin as the vernacular. For humans, that is. Elves, dwarves, orcs, trolls, and werewolves all have their own native speech.

The premise is intriguing: the Pope sends three Church scholars to decide if elves have souls. The stakes are high: If the committee decides in the negative, it¿s war against the elves. We see most of the adventure through the eyes of idealistic Marcus Valerius. His slave Marcipor¿brash, charming, and a lady-killer¿is a perfect foil to Marcus. His slave bodyguard, a dwarf gladiator, has seen it all and performed brave deeds¿and gives Marcipor a lesson in true loyalty.

If you like long journeys on horseback, swords, sorcery, political intrigue, battles, explosions, and breathtaking rescues, this compact book is for you. Like Tolkien, Beale gives us Appendices to add to the story. The first is the official Church document about the eternal condition of the elves. The second contains two short stories from Beale¿s world. The second of those stories reminded me of the `Little Flowers of St. Francis of Assisi¿¿simple and full of wonder.

So, gentlemen, in between NFL games and the race to the World Series, pick up Summa Elevetica: a Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy and read about some real battles - the kind that put your body and soul in peril. And watch out for those elves; they work some pretty deadly magic.
Novel_Teen_Book_Reviews More than 1 year ago
In Theodore Beale¿s Summa Elvetica, young nobleman Marcus Valerius is sent with a delegation to Elebrion to help settle the debate among church scholars as to whether or not elves have souls. The task is no simple matter since a holy was hinges on the outcome of his assessment.

On the long journey to the Elf kingdom, Marcus befriends those in the delegation including several warrior-priests, an elf, and his new dwarf bodyguard. He learns much from these men through historical war accounts. When the party arrives in Elebrion, the Elf king treats them to dinner where Marcus discovers a shocking betrayal.

I enjoyed reading Summa Elvetica. The storyworld was fascinating as were the characters. Marcus is honest, smart, and naïve toward the ways of the world, which made him very likeable despite his wealth and lofty status. His adventure entertained me until the last page. I wished there were more to the story. Recommended.