Summer at Forsaken Lake

Summer at Forsaken Lake

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780375864964
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Publication date: 06/11/2013
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 336
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.90(d)
Lexile: 770L (what's this?)
Age Range: 10 - 12 Years

About the Author

MICHAEL D. BEIL teaches English at a Catholic high school in New York City. He is the author of three installments of his Edgar Award-nominated Red Blazer Girls mysteries, with a fourth in the works.

Read an Excerpt

chapter one

Goblin tugged at her mooring, darting back and forth, her bow pitching high in the air and then dropping violently with every frothy, white-­tipped wave. Her rope halyards—­used to hoist the sails—­slapped against the varnished wooden mast, and a corner of sail that had worked loose flapped noisily in the steadily building breeze. The leaves of the sugar maple tree in the front yard, so brilliantly green a few minutes earlier, turned their dull undersides upward, a million mirrors reflecting the angry gray sky above. Farther out on the lake, the whitecaps were already beaten down by a curtain of rain being pulled across the lake and toward the house and porch where Nicholas Mettleson sat.

His uncle—­great-­uncle, actually—­had promised to take him and his twin sisters sailing today, but now that would have to wait. The worst of the squall—­the heavy wind and the thunder and lightning—­would pass by quickly, but the forecast called for the rain to continue most of the day. Nicholas was only a little bit disappointed, though. After all, it was just the third day of summer vacation; there would be plenty of time to learn to sail in the next two and a half months.

A few minutes later, Nicholas’s great-­uncle Nick, a steaming mug of coffee in hand, came out onto the porch through the screen door, followed by his gray-­muzzled dog, Pistol. “Mind if we join you? Looks like a doozy. No better place for watching a good thunderstorm.”

Nicholas smiled at him and scooted to the end of the wooden porch swing, where he felt the mist on his face as the rain blew through the screening. “Do you think Goblin will be all right?” he asked. “It’s really bouncing around out there.”

“Oh, don’t worry about her. She’ll be fine—­ridden out worse lots of times. Much worse.” The chains supporting the swing squeaked as Nick and his young namesake settled in to watch the storm with Pistol curled up on the seat between them.

“Did you really build it, er, her?” Nicholas asked. He had been sailing only once before—­in a much smaller boat at summer camp upstate two years earlier—­and was still getting used to the idea that the twenty-­eight-­foot Goblin was a she, not an it. He was also trying to figure out how Nick, who, as a young man, had lost most of his left arm in a farming accident, could possibly have hand-built a boat as beautiful as Goblin.

“From keel to masthead,” Nick said proudly. “I’ll show you some pictures later if you like. Built her in the barn out back.”

Just then, a jagged blue flash of lightning lit up the darkened sky, and they both braced for the loud crack that followed.

“That was close,” Nicholas said, a touch of worry in his voice.

“Mrs. Phillips’s television antenna,” said Nick. “Gets it most every time. Sticks up about a hundred and ten feet. All so she can watch those soap operas. Never had much use for television myself. There’s a little one around here somewhere, if you kids get desperate. Course, reception isn’t much out here. Last time I checked, I think I picked up two stations in Erie.”

“Aren’t you afraid the lightning will hit Goblin?” Nicholas asked.

“Oh, I’m sure it has—­more than once. No harm—­she’s properly grounded. The current goes from the mast right down through the keel and out.”

“What if you were holding on to the mast when it hit?”

“Can’t say as I’d recommend that, Nicholas. You’d probably look a lot like one of those neon signs in Times Square.”

Nicholas laughed. Maybe this won’t be such a boring summer after all. Before Nick picked them up at the train station in Erie, Nicholas had met his uncle a grand total of three times: twice at weddings, and once for the funeral of Nick’s wife, Lillie, who had died two years earlier. When his dad first suggested sending him and his twin sisters to Nick’s house on Forsaken Lake for the whole summer, Nicholas was skeptical—­especially after looking up the word “forsaken” in the dictionary and discovering that it meant “abandoned or desolate.” On the inside, he was quite certain that he would hate it, but his dad seemed so excited about it that he hid his true feelings—­or tried to. Even though he had never spent any time “in the country” himself, all his friends back in New York City assured him that it would be the most boring summer of his life.

“There’s nothing to do in the country,” said one.

“There’s nowhere fun to go,” said another.

“And everybody knows everything you do,” said yet another. “So you can’t do anything fun anyway.”

Nicholas’s father, Dr. Will Mettleson, painted a very different picture of life at the old Victorian house, just steps from the lake. Growing up, he spent several summers with Uncle Nick and Aunt Lillie, and loved every second. He learned to fish and sail and camp and how to build things with his own two hands, and he swore to Nicholas that he never once missed the city while he was there. And he promised Nicholas that if he hated it, he wouldn’t have to go back the next summer.

But something else his father said really got Nicholas’s curiosity moving at warp speed.

“That old house of Uncle Nick’s, and the lake—­they’re both full of secrets. You just have to know where to look. You never know what you might find.”

“Like what?” a wide-­eyed Nicholas asked, forgetting his skepticism for a moment.

“Start in the tower room,” his father said. “That’s where I always slept. It has the best view; heck, it’s the best room in the house. Maybe the nicest room on the whole lake. I’ve already checked with Uncle Nick—­it’s yours if you want it.”

The tower room, he explained, jutted up through the middle of the house as if somebody had set a greenhouse on the roof, and could be reached only by climbing a tightly wound, vertigo-­inducing spiral staircase. The windows gave it a spectacular view of the lake, and on summer nights when the air was perfectly still and it was too hot to sleep in the other bedrooms, a breeze blew through the gauzy, sun-­bleached curtains, keeping the room comfortable. Inside, it was the ultimate in simplicity. A bed. A small dresser. A brass telescope on a tripod. In other words, the perfect room for the twelve-­year-­old Nicholas Mettleson.

Nick and Nicholas sat together, swinging slowly back and forth as they watched and listened to the storm barreling past them. The lake was calm again, its surface ruffled only by the rain that continued to fall, though not nearly as hard. With a sailing lesson out of the question for the time being, Nicholas decided it was a good time to start his exploration of the house—­beginning with the tower room.

“I’m going upstairs for a while, to watch from my room,” he said. “I’ll bet it’s like being right in the storm cloud.”

Nick sent him off with a little wave. “Go. Enjoy. We’ll go into town in a while. I need to pick up a few things. You can do a bit of exploring if you’d rather not go to the A&P.”

Nicholas climbed the staircase, past the small, simply framed oil paintings that lined the walls, not noticing until he reached the last one that they were all signed Lillie. He didn’t even know that his great-­aunt had been a painter—­and a pretty good one, he thought as he backed down the stairs to get a closer look at each. The paintings were a scrapbook of her life: the house and barn built by her great-­grandfather in 1895; the lake in all four seasons; the yard, with its towering maples and poplars; and finally, Nick’s pride and joy, Goblin—­resting peacefully at her mooring in one painting, heeled over with spray flying over her bow in another. That one made Nicholas want to go sailing even more.

“Whatcha lookin’ at?” asked Hayley from the bottom of the stairs.

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Kids' Indie Next List, Summer 2012

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Summer at Forsaken Lake 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
This_Kid_Reviews_Books More than 1 year ago
Nicholas is not looking forward to spending the summer with his twin sisters, Haley and Hetty at his Uncle Nick's house at Forsaken Lake. Nick's Dad is a doctor and he is going to Africa to help out people who need it in the Doctors Without Borders program. Things start to get interesting when Nick finds a secret compartment in his Uncle's house. The compartment is filled with stuff from Nick's dad. One of the things in the compartment is a movie made by Nick's father. The movie is about the legendary Seaweed Strangler at Forsaken lake, but it was never finished. Nick and his new friend, Charlie (a kind of tomboyish girl) set out to discovery the mystery behind the movie, the Seaweed Strangler and some old family secrets that they never knew about! This book had it all - mystery, adventure, excitement, friendship, a great setting, a Seaweed Strangler, great characters, alien robots... OK it didn't have alien robots, but it did have all the other stuff. The story was written well. It kept me turning the pages. I think I should tell you that even though it has the Seaweed Strangler movie in the book, it is not a horror book, there is no violence (except during a kid-made movie, but that's not over-the-top violence) and no cursing at all. Mr. Beil wrote a great mystery that kids of all ages can read! The sketchy illustrations throughout the book really went nicely with the story. I highly recommend this book! **Note - I bought a copy of this book at a festival.
InTheBookcase More than 1 year ago
This book is a super-fun read either in the summer... or in the dead of winter, when you dream of the warmth summer, like myself. It added sunshine to the cold days of January for me. "Summer at Forsaken Lake" holds a big adventure type of story in a small little town. When Nicholas Mettleson visits his Uncle Nick on Forsaken Lake, he and his two little sisters make some big discoveries about their dad and his boyhood. From hidden compartments with secrets inside, the story of a boat wrecked decades ago, the mystery of 2:43am, plus a bit of hard work and oodles of fun.... there's a lot of intrigue going on to keep the Mettleson kids (and their new friend, Charlie) entertained for weeks (as well as the reader). Definitely a lively middle-grade novel. The one thing I didn't care for was that Nicholas and his friend often talk about "if only" their parents would have stayed together, even though the adults now have their own families. Some people may not care one way or the other on this aspect though. I did really like how the author made the kids really work for their rewards... our generation of kids need to be exposed to that kind of commitment. The audio version of this book (narrated by Thomas Vincent Kelly) was recorded and produced very well. I greatly enjoyed listening to it! Oh, and thanks to the author, I now have just got to find myself a copy of "We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea" and read it! (You probably will too, once you read "Summer at Forsaken Lake".
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Preetygood dood go read thuis book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has mystery and humor for kids 10+
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is an amazing experience for readers everywhere. It teaches you about family and what emotions can do to you. You can also learn about friendship, and sailing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Just a god bok
Read_A_Book More than 1 year ago
This is a great MG novel that I highly recommend to parents and teachers alike. Filled with adventure, mystery, and intrigue, Beil takes his young readers on a ride that they won’t soon forget. Originally, I thought that this novel was going to be a type of horror/suspense novel, with a seaweed monster and the like, but it actually turned out to be more focused on family values and coming of age, which I enjoyed. While I was a little disappointed that there wasn’t more dealing with a real live seaweed monster, I liked the digging the kids do to uncover the truth about their dad and why he never visits Forsaken Lake anymore. Overall, this is a very well written story with some great morals that I think are great for the MG and younger YA readers. I personally tend to like books for a little bit older crowd, but still think this is a great read!