Sunset Rising (Sunset Rising Trilogy, #1)

Sunset Rising (Sunset Rising Trilogy, #1)

by S.M. McEachern

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940155442325
Publisher: Clownfish Publishing
Publication date: 11/06/2014
Series: Sunset Rising Trilogy , #1
Sold by: Draft2Digital
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 79,006
File size: 539 KB

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Sunset Rising 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
224perweek More than 1 year ago
This story reminds me of "The City Of Ember" combined with the "Tunnels" series. What a great adventure. It's exciting, scary, romantic.................keeps you on the edge of your seat. Can't wait to read book 2.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Welcome to a world where your inner strength means so much!
Sparrowhawk24 More than 1 year ago
Sunset Rising is one of those stories that will linger with you well after you’ve read it, and will continue to stir and grow internally. It is a story that brims with topical points and strong political tropes; it goes without saying that those who are willing to dig deeper will appreciate the unwelcomed realization on how it directly speaks into the dangerous of fascism. This was more than just a monotonous experience; it held the capacity to inspire! Simply stated, Sunset Rising is rock-solid. The story kept me riveted and unblinking for the entire 33 chapters! I highly recommend this narrative to all as it will leave you pondering on matters that we seldom take notice of because we are too distracted by things that do not matter ¿ it is hands-down a top 10 pick for 2015! WHAT I LIKED: + The plot as a whole! It was incredible, absolutely incredible. It is well-thought-out and everything within its context works on so many levels; needless to say, it is churned with a myriad of themes and symbolism, and it has a message that you become unwittingly involved in: People should never fear their governments. Governments should fear the people. Sounds dangerous right!? Well it totally is! + Having said that, Sunset Rising is plot-driven, and as aforementioned, it inspires by showing the reader that if enough people stand behind something they strongly believe in, victory is imminent. But at what cost? At any cost friends, because the fact of the matter is that, nothing in this world can substitute freedom. Absolutely nothing; freedom is incalculable! Especially, when one is under never-ending physical and emotional oppression, when one is forced to see their very own family killed and separated from them forever, when poverty and starvation steals the lives of your fellowmen, when narcissistic tyrants seek to control the mind and lives of others; thus, you have to fight lest you become immune against the fascist virus! You see what happened there? A full spark of insurgency is what arose, and that’s what this book does right here (points to heart) + As you can imagine, life in an underground pit is an impossible situation ¿ space is limited. Therefore, food is controlled, as well as the population; not to mention, work is strenuous and impractical too! Especially, when one is malnourished. You know, now that I mention it, Sunset Rising shares similar parallels to that of the holocaust, and in light of this, the bleakness of the book is perfectly captured ¿ you genuinely feel sympathy for each character. Take for example, this snippet: "The bourge reminded us daily that we were uninvited guests inside the Dome, and in order for us to remain welcome, we had to pull our weight. Ever since we first arrived in the Pit, we mined their coal, processed their sewage, cleaned the Dome, and did anything else they tasked us with. In exchange, they gave us credits, which we used to pay for our housing and basic needs. Without enough credits, we ended up homeless. And homeless people disappeared after the lights went out. The credit system was just another way the bourge ensured that every person in the Pit remained useful. Freeloaders were not tolerated." Most affecting for me, was the way the Urchin’s (the underground citizens) were willing to hold on to some sense of hope despite their weary tragic fate + The writing in Sunset Rising is impeccable and very straightforward, and you cannot help but notice the way in which every word has been carefully chosen and written; each sentence, each paragraph, each chapter flows to create a convincing and compelling story line that naturally draws you in + Which stands to reason that, the dialogue is skillfully carried out as well. It is relevant, authentic, and it stems with enough natural emotion to make you feel as though everything within this book was real! + Every character has a role to play in Sunset Rising and every small detail is taken into consideration: The cause and effects of population control, the revolution and uprising, the amount of strenuous labor and expectation that is required of the Urchin despite their shortcomings, the form of brutality that is inflicted upon the Urchin; the aromas, sounds and fighting sequences; all of it is absolutely remarkable. I’m totally not kidding when I say this, but I literally stood up and applauded when I finished reading this book, I never do that! + The motives and character arc of our antagonist in this prose is fleshed out and well-developed; so much so, that you shockingly find yourself empathizing with her! Granted, she’s a certified lunatic, but yet, you find yourself reasoning with her flaws, her motives and her relentless zeal to prevent Sunny and Jack from achieving their goals. To put it plainly, she is not overlooked + Sunny O’Donnell is arguably one of the most fascinating protagonists presently out there. She is appealing and stronger than most; yet, while this may be true, I admit that I didn’t fully esteem her character. I loved her, but then there were moments where I was utterly frustrated by her feeble reasoning! In spite of these sentiments however, I wasn’t able to fully disregard her character arc, because the fact of the matter is: Sunny O’Donell is broken and perfectly complex. What made Sunny O’Donnell outshine this slight quibble though, were her surroundings, which echoed loudly throughout the entire narrative, and the strength she found in her plights to fully surrender and embrace her pain and hardships. She isn’t a victim either, (though she is certainly vulnerable) rather, she lends some much-needed spark and stability to female protagonists, and the way she inspires and lifts her fellowmen into heights otherwise unattainable, is most admirable I suppose I do admire her after all! :D WHAT I DIDN’T LIKED: I wasn’t able to find any fault or criticism in this narrative. It is sheer perfection in my book <3
TheNotSoPublicLibrary More than 1 year ago
Very interesting plot line for sure, and is quite relevant to this time, with nuclear warheads being in the US being in the news recently. Sunset rising is about Sunset O’Donnell, an “urchin” in in a post-apocalyptic world. In her world, nuclear war has struck, forcing a city and some of the military to take residence in a created environment called “The Dome”. Early on, the leader of the military forces the civilians who took refuge there into a contract that makes them nothing more than slaves, and guarantees they will be killed or “culled” fifty years old. Three hundred some years later in comes Sunset. The labor and treatment of her people has gotten worse, and the age of culling has been lowered to thirty-five years old. Sunny gets sucked into a political scandal unwittingly, and everything in her hard by mundane life changes. The people like her, living in the “Pit”, want change, want freedom, and equality; and with Sunny’s scandal, they might just be ready to fight for it. I really enjoyed this book, it was increasingly interesting and action packed. Although, I do feel like it dragged on a bit. I feel like things didn't need to take as long to pick up as they did. The rising action didn't really start until I was around thirty-eight percent into the book. That was a long thirty-eight percent of reading time. But I believe that it was totally worth it, because once it picked up, I fell in love. I honestly do recommend this book and give it a sold rating of four stars
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was fantabulous, and I need the sequel, like 5 hours ago. While it wasn't the most original concept, the author did a great job by creating so many twists and relatable characters with a side of very engaging writing that it made it hard to pit down. Synopsis: The a-crats live in the Dome. The "urchins" live in the Pit. Te urchins do all the dirty work amd live as slaves while the Domers prosper. The main character, Sunny, gets caught up in the scam of the century when she meets the Presidents daughter, Liesel. Now on the run with Liesel's fiance, Sunny and Jack hide out in the Pit organizing a rebelllion that will create equal rights for those in the Pit with those in the Dome. Sunset Rising is infused with humor, tradegy, action, and yes, romance (though not a butt load that it over powers the book). Definitely recommend this book! Happy Reading!!!
KingPea More than 1 year ago
FABULOUS!!! I fricken loved this story! I have to agree with another reviewer who said this is 7 star book not a 5 star ~~seriously it is THAT good! First, the writing was flawless~ really, really well told. Think Hunger Games meets Under the Never Sky ~~ simply awesome! How is this not on every bestseller list yet? Listen to me now, please... if you love Dystopian YA novels ~~~ READ THIS BOOK! The adventure in this story is gripping from the very beginning. The world is described so well, it is all very real. The people of the Pit live with such sever oppression. While the Domers have such abundance. The characters are fleshed out perfectly- you really do suffer alongside them, and some are just so easy to hate. Sunny and Jack are both complex in their own ways, and make a fabulous team. Jack was a such a pleasant surprise. I can not believe the ending... I don't know what to do now... Ms. McEachern, I am begging you to please release the second book soon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book truly blew my mind. It is pure GENIUS. At first, I thought it would be another boring dystopian novel. But as I got into the book, it sucked me in and did not let go. I finished this book in under two days because I could not stop reading. Hunger Games fans will be thrilled to have a new book on their hands. I NEVER compare books to the Hunger Games, but this book is definetely worthy. This book is as good, if not BETTER, than the Hunger Games. (Sorry Suzanne) Yes, I went there. Dystopian lovers MUST read this book. ~zissa122
Lauryn_Kelly More than 1 year ago
I liked the idea of their world being underground. (Goodness, that place must be huge to accommodate all those people and things!) I thought the resulting hierarchy was believable. I liked how one unintentional, ultimately misunderstood, act affected the people - how it soon snowballed and inspired some to hope, to rise up. Jack was a likable character. It was nice to see a well-to-do not acting like a snob. My feelings were mixed concerning Sunny. Mostly my negative thoughts about her involved questioning the plausibility of her excelling at 'exercise' when she's malnourished. I enjoyed how she utilized her 'night vision' in later scenes though. The writing could have implemented more showing, less telling. There were a few spelling errors and its/it's mistakes. The prologue, in my opinion, could have been left out entirely. Sunny ends up explaining or discovering past events and how it led to her current situation, so the prologue wasn't really necessary.  The romance, even a somewhat idea of a love triangle for a time, felt forced, but at least the snogging didn't happen right away. Certain events were monotonous. For a while, there was an obvious, predictable pattern to their daily affairs. I understand there's not a lot they could do as subterranean 'slaves,' but a little more variety (and less focus on sorting laundry & loading a washer machine) would have be nice. Still, the idea was good, and despite its flaws, I enjoyed reading it. I plan to check out the satellite stories and the sequel. Note: I received a free copy from the author for a fair and honest review.
ClaireTaylor More than 1 year ago
S.M. McEachern Sunset Rising Book 1 As a YA dystopian novel, this has got to be one of the best I’ve read, and now I can’t wait to read more. The author has managed to create a remarkable future world, where the poor are used as slaves, and the rich live a life of luxury. The president is crazy and his daughter comes up with a plan that turns Summer’s and Jack’s lives upside down, changing everything. Incredibly well written and descriptive, this book had me completely gripped from start to finish and I had difficulty putting it down. The character development is flawless, and their strengths shine through as the book continues. This book will definitely be read time and time again. I received an e-copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Molly Burkemper for Readers Favorite It is 2307, nearly three hundred years since nuclear war destroyed the Earth. Now, the only civilization remaining is the people of the Dome, a sealed refuge from the toxic radiation that remains. The people of the Dome live in luxury, but it comes at a great cost. Their survival depends upon the subterranean Pit, where Sunny O'Donnell lives. The people of the Pit were not meant to be in the Dome 283 years ago when the bombs went off. They had to make a deal to get inside to safety: they signed themselves over as slaves to the Dome, and they would each be killed, or Culled, at age 35 to prevent overpopulation. This is the world in which Sunny now lives. Through a series of events, she finds herself involved in the upcoming marriage between Jack Kenner and the President's daughter. When the situation goes sour, Sunny and Jack must fight for their lives, and for the lives of all who live in the Pit. Revolution is the only solution. "Sunset Rising" is thrilling; there is no better word for it. It lures readers in with its fresh and tempting plot, and then hooks them with nonstop action that leaves them reading late into the night. The beginning doesn't do the rest of the book justice, but if readers allow themselves to be taken in, they will have a heart-stopping ride until the very end. Romance, intrigue, and action all come together beautifully here to create an experience that will leave anyone asking for more.