Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior

Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior

by Rom Brafman, Ori Brafman
3.7 51

Hardcover

$18.03 $21.95 Save 18% Current price is $18.03, Original price is $21.95. You Save 18%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior by Rom Brafman, Ori Brafman

A fascinating journey into the hidden psychological influences that derail our decision-making, Sway will change the way you think about the way you think.

Why is it so difficult to sell a plummeting stock or end a doomed relationship? Why do we listen to advice just because it came from someone “important”? Why are we more likely to fall in love when there’s danger involved? In Sway, renowned organizational thinker Ori Brafman and his brother, psychologist Rom Brafman, answer all these questions and more.

Drawing on cutting-edge research from the fields of social psychology, behavioral economics, and organizational behavior, Sway reveals dynamic forces that influence every aspect of our personal and business lives, including loss aversion (our tendency to go to great lengths to avoid perceived losses), the diagnosis bias (our inability to reevaluate our initial diagnosis of a person or situation), and the “chameleon effect” (our tendency to take on characteristics that have been arbitrarily assigned to us).

Sway introduces us to the Harvard Business School professor who got his students to pay $204 for a $20 bill, the head of airline safety whose disregard for his years of training led to the transformation of an entire industry, and the football coach who turned conventional strategy on its head to lead his team to victory. We also learn the curse of the NBA draft, discover why interviews are a terrible way to gauge future job performance, and go inside a session with the Supreme Court to see how the world’s most powerful justices avoid the dangers of group dynamics.

Every once in a while, a book comes along that not only challenges our views of the world but changes the way we think. In Sway, Ori and Rom Brafman not only uncover rational explanations for a wide variety of irrational behaviors but also point readers toward ways to avoid succumbing to their pull.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780385524384
Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
Publication date: 06/03/2008
Pages: 224
Product dimensions: 8.56(w) x 5.86(h) x 0.87(d)

About the Author

Coming soon...

Coming soon...

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 51 reviews.
sstinson More than 1 year ago
At the end of Chapter Two, the authors engage in precisely the sort of dead head logic they lampoon in Chapter Three, which is where I stopped reading. This is the sort of breezy faux scholarship that department heads are forever force feeding middle management. If you want to learn about human nature, you'll get more by sharing two drinks with a bartender -- about what this book costs.
Pete_Moss More than 1 year ago
I purchased this after reading the WSJ review, thinking it would have some insights as to irrational behavior. However, it's just a subjective view of decisions the author thinks are nonsensical and then a pseudo-scientific analysis to support that perspective. I should have gone to a book store and skimmed the book first.
M_L_Gooch_SPHR More than 1 year ago
We all make mistakes. Some minor, others, life-changing. Obtaining all the knowledge we can about this field will enhance our time on earth. Based on great stories and solid research, this fun book takes a meandering stroll down the beaches of behavioral and social science. Along the way, we find pearls of wisdom.

In light of the lessons I learned in this book, I will now have to go back and re-read Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinkingby Malcolm Gladwell whose lessons I have been applying at work and home. This book - in a way - is the opposite of Blink whereby our intuition does not rush in to save the day.

I applaud the lack of digressions and tangents. Too often, this type of book leaves the subject matter to discuss an area the reader has not interest in. My only negative critique is that this is really more of a subject for a magazine or journal article rather than a full-blown book length treatment. Still, I really enjoyed the book and hope you find this review helpful.

Michael L. Gooch, SPHR
NewsieQ More than 1 year ago
I’m always curious about why people (myself included) do the goofy things they do. Sway helps explain some of that, using storytelling and a generous amount of research into the topic. As it turns out, the main reasons we behave irrationally boil down to three: loss aversion, value affirmation and diagnosis bias. The author uses storytelling to define each, and then covers the research that gives them meaning. I thought this might be Gladwell-esque and it was. The stories aren’t as extensive, but the research component is stronger than in Maldolm Gladwell’s books. I thought the author gave short shrift to what we can do to help avoid the three traps in thinking. Some of the information he presented is counter-intuitive -- like the fact that money can be a DIS-incentive to rational behavior. I found it interesting that the altruism center and the pleasure center of the brain cannot be activated at the same time. Lots of food for thought in Sway, and for that reason alone, I can recommend it. I will be likely to go back to this book again and again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fast and entertaining read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very informative & easy to apply to real-life scenerios.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All in all, this was a book that starts of great and plummets down towards. There was some good insight on a part of our irrational behavior.But it seemed rather broad without a clear answer.This is all tolled from his perspective; unfortunately. And supported by some facts to prove his point.Not say that he is complete wrong, he did have intriguing descriptions regarding to how we make our judgment call's. This book is worthing read, I might have not found everything worth while because I couldn't apply it to my past experiences. But I did learn a little more about irrational behavior then, I would have not reading. There are a hand full of great description that I found beneficial to me. There were interesting ideas that if acknowledged can help us realize a little bit more about our decisions. I have learned that it's amazing that even thought we all think differently and processes information differently. There is a similarity in how our decision making can be mislead or "swayed" and that is where we all fail and make potential mistakes. I would say that if you get this book it's important to read till the end. Also, to have an open mind while reading not everything might apply to you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago